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PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 57. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



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January 1, 1903 




BOSTON : 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 
1903. 



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Approved by 

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The State Boarjo.'o'^ j^ublicatton. 



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CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

I Organization and Administration, 

(1) Board, Officers and Employes, * 

(2) Offices and Buildings, 

(3) Conveyancing ° 

II. Water Works, Construction, 

(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir, 

(a) Wachusett Dam, 

(b) Wachusett Reservoir, 

(c) Location, Construction and Discontinuance of Roads, 

(rf) Relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad 10 

(e) Clinton Catholic Cemetery, 12 

(/) Sanitary Inspection of Watershed, " 

(2) Improvement of Lake Cochituate, 13 

(«) Snake Brook Meadow, 13 

(b) Pegan Brook Meadow, ** 

(c) Improvement of Pegan Brook Filtration System 1* 

(3) Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir *"> 

(4) Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe at Quincy, I 6 

(5) Bear Hill Reservoir, 1? 

(6) Pipe Laying, 1" 

(7) Improvement of Spot Pond Brook, 18 

(8) Police Protection, 21 

(9) Purchases and Takings of Land, , .... 21 

(10) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Business, 25 

(11) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Employment, 25 

(12) Claims and Settlements for Depreciation of Real Estate 25 

III. Water Works, Maintenance, 26 

(1) Operation of Works, 26 

(2) Storage Reservoirs 27 

(3) Distributing Reservoirs, 28 

(4) Aqueducts, 29 

(5) Pumping Stations . 29 

(6) Pipe Lines and Pipe Yards 30 

(7) Clinton Sewerage and Filtration Works, 31 

(8) Sanitary Inspection and Regulations, 31 

IV. Water Works, Financial Statement, 33 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loan, Receipts and Assessments, 33 

(2) Expenditures for the Different Works, 36 

(3) Detailed Financial Statement 39 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 39 

(b) Receipts, 47 

(c) Assets, 48 

(d) Liabilities 48 

V. Sewerage Works, Construction, 50 

(1) North Metropolitan System, 50 

(2) South Metropolitan System, 51 

(3) Purchases and Takings^of Land 53 

VI. Sewerage Works, Maintenance, 54 

(1) North Metropolitan System 54 

(2) South Metropolitan System 55 



iv CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

VII. Sewerage Works, Financial Statement, 55 

(1) Construction Loans and Receipts, 55 

(a) North Metropolitan System, 55 

(ft) South Metropolitan System, 56 

(o) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund 56 

(2) Annual Appropriations and Receipts, 57 

(3) Annual Assessments, 57 

(4) Expenditures for the Different Works, - ... 59 

(5) Detailed Financial Statement, 60 

(«) Expenditures and Disbursements, 60 

(ft) Receipts 64 

(c) Assets 64 

(il) Liabilities, 65 

VIII. Admission of Other Municipalities into the Metropolitan Water District 66 

IX. Consumption and Waste of Water 66 

X. Measurement of Water supplied to the Various Municipalities, and the Prevention of 

Unnecessary or Improper Use or Waste 69 

XI. Electrolysis affecting Iron Pipes, 71 

XII. Recommendations for Additional Appropriations for Sewerage Works, .... 71 

XIII. Necessity of Separate Sewer Systems for Sewage exclusively 74 

XIV. Industrial Conditions, f 76 

XV. Future Work 77 



Report of Chief Engineer, 79 

Organization, 79 

Force employed on Works 81 

Arrangement of Report, 81 

Construction, 82 

Contracts, 82 

Reservoir Department 84 

North Dike, 84 

Relocation and Construction of Roads, 87 

Removal of Soil 89 

Relocation of Railroads, 91 

Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir, 94 

Improving the Wachusett Watershed 102 

Land Surveys, 102 

Real Estate, Care and Disposal, 102 

Sanitary Inspection, 103 

Removal of Bodies from St. John's Catholic Cemetery, 104 

Engineering, 104 

Dam and Aqueduct Department, 105 

Wachusett Dam, 105 

Relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad 114 

Contracts, Central Massachusetts Railroad 115 

Mortar Experiments 120 

Improvement of Channel of Nashua River below the Lancaster Mills in Clinton, . . 122 

Real Estate, Care and Disposal, 123 

Cement Tests, 123 

Sudbury Department, 123 

Improvement of Lake Cochituate, 124 

Snake Brook Meadow, 124 

Pegan Brook Meadow, 125 

Weston Aqueduct Department, 127 

Weston Aqueduct, 128 

Contracts, Weston Aqueduct, 130 

Sanitary Inspection, 154 

Engineering,' 154 






CONTENTS. v 

PAGE 

Report of Chief Engineer — Concluded. 
Construction — Concluded. 

Distribution Department, 155 

Pipes, Special Castings and Valves, 156 

Pipe Laying 157 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 163 

Forbes Hill Water Tower, 165 

Installation of Venturi Meters, 165 

Miscellaneous, 167 

Engineering, 167 

Office Force, 168 

Accidents 170 

Maintenance, 171 

Organization of Maintenance Force 171 

Rainfall and Yield, 171 

Storage Reservoirs, 171 

Sources from which Water has been taken, 176 

Aqueducts, 177 

Wachusett 177 

Sudbury, 177 

Cochituate, 179 

Pumping Stations, 180 

Chestnut Hill High Service 182 

Chestnut Hill Low Service, 183 

Spot Pond 184 

West Roxbury, 184 

Arlington, 185 

Consumption of Water 186 

Quality of Water, 187 

Biological Laboratory, 189 

Sanitary Inspection, 189 

Drainage of Swamps, 193 

Distributing Reservoirs, 194 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 194 

Waban Hill Reservoir 194 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe 194 

Spot Pond, 195 

Mystic Reservoir, 196 

Fells Reservoir, 196 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 196 

Mystic Lake, 196 

Pipe Yards 196 

Pipe Lines, 196 

Electrolysis 199 

Prevention of Waste, e 200 

Clinton Sewerage, 202 



Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works, 205 

Organization, 205 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, 206 

Areas and Populations, 206 

Metropolitan Sewers, . 206 

Sewers purchased and constructed, and their Connections 206 

Cost of Construction, 208 

Construction and Additions during the Year, 208 

Tables of Areas, Populations, Sewer Mileage, etc., 209 

Pumping Stations and Pumpage, 209 

Construction on North Metropolitan System, 210 

Additions to Pumping Plant, Alewife Brook Station 210 



vi CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works — Continued. 

Construction on South Metropolitan System, 211 

Neponset Valley Sewer, West Roxbury and Newton , . 211 

Section 30 211 

High-level Sewer 211 

Details of Contract Sections (Table), 213 

Summary of Table, 217 

Rock Excavation and Explosives, 218 

Type of High-level Sewer 218 

Section 43, Quincy and Hull 219 

Section 44, Quincy 221 

Section 45, Quincy, 222 

Section 46, Quincy 223 

Section 47, Quincy, 223 

Sections 48 and 49, Quincy, Culverts and Embankments, 224 

Section 48, Quincy, Sewer Construction, 225 

Section 49, Quincy, Sewer Construction 225 

Section 50, Quincy, 226 

Section 51, Quincy, 227 

Section 52, Quincy 227 

Section 53, Quincy, 228 

Section 54, Quincy, 229 

Section 55, Quincy and Milton 229 

Section 56, Milton, 231 

Section 57, Milton, 231 

Section 58, Milton, 232 

Section 59, Milton, 232 

Section 60, Milton 233 

Section 61, Milton, ' 234 

Section 62, Milton, 234 

Section 63, Milton 235 

Section 64, Milton and Hyde Park (Day Work), 235 

Section 65, Hyde Park, 236 

Section 66, Hyde Park, 236 

Section 67, Hyde Park (Day Work) 237 

Section 68, Hyde Park and West Roxbury 238 

Section 69, West Roxbury, 238 

Section 70, West Roxbury, 238 

Section 71, West Roxbury 238 

Section 72, West Roxbury, 238 

Section 73, West Roxbury, 239 

Section 74, West Roxbury and Roxbury, 241 

Section 75, Roxbury 242 

Section 76, Roxbury, 243 

Section 77, Roxbury, ^ 243 

Section 78, Roxbury 244 

Cement Testing, ... . * 244 

Maintenance 247 

lie of Work and Force employed, 247 

Xorth Metropolitan System (Table), 248 

South Metropolitan System (Table), 249 

Whole Metropolitan System (Table), 250 

Capacity and Results 251 

Deer Island Pumping Station „ 251 

East Boston Pumping Station, 252 

Charlestown Pumping Station, 253 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station, 254 

Quincy Pumping Station 255 

Cost of Pumping, 256 

Deer Island Pumping Station 256 

Bast Boston Pumping Station, 256 

Charlestown Pumping Station, 256 

Alewife Brook'Pumping'Station, 257 

Quincy Pumping Station 257 



CONTENTS. vii 

PAGE 

Report of Engineer of Sewerage Works — Concluded. 
Maintenance — Concluded. 

Material intercepted at the Screens, 257 

Care of Special Structures 257 

Additional Salt-water Suction Pipe, Deer Island Pumping Station, 257 

Riprap Protection, Shirley Gut Siphon 258 

House over Shaft, Charlestown Shore, Mystic River Crossing, 258 

Studies of Sewage Flow, 258 



Appendix No. 1. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending during 

the Year 1902 260 

Appendix No. 2. — Cement Tests made on Metropolitan Water Works 275 

Appendix No. 3. — Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, . . 280 
Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water Works in 1902, 280 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall at Jefferson, Mass., in 1902, . . .281 

Table No. 3. —Rainfall at Framingham, Mass., in 1902 282 

Table No. 4. — Rainfall at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1902, 283 

Table No. 5. — Rainfall on the Nashua Watershed, 1897 to 1902, 285 

Table No. 6. — Rainfall on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1902, 286 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Nashua River in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 1897 to 

1902 287 

Table No. 8. — Yield of Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 1875 

to 1902 288 

Table No. 9. — Nashua River, — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1902, . 290 
Table No. 10. — Sudbury River, — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1902, . 291 
Table No. 11. — Lake Cochituate, — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 1902, 292 
Table No. 12. — Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at the 

Beginning of Each Month 293 

Table No. 13. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1902, by 

Months, 294 

Table No. 14. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 1 at Chestnut Hill High-service Pump- 
ing Station for the Year 1902, 295 

Table No. 15. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill High-service Pump- 
ing Station for the Year 1902, 296 

Table No. 16. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill High-service Pump- 
ing Station for the Year 1902, 297 

Table No. 17. — Statement of Operations of Engines Nos. 5, 6 and 7 at Chestnut Hill Low- 
service Pumping Station for the Year 1902, 298 

Table No. 18. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station for 

the Year 1902, 299 

Table No 19. — Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns supplied wholly 

or in Part by the Metropolitan Water Works 300 

Table No. 20. — Average Daily Consumption of Water from the Low Service 300 

Table No. 21. — Average Daily Consumption of Water from the Southern High Service and 

the Southern Extra High Service, 301 

Table No. 22. —Average Daily Consumption of Water from the Northern High Service and 

the Northern Extra High Service 301 

Table No. 23. — Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District as constituted De- 
cember 31, 1902, and the Towns of Milton and Swampscott and a Small Por- 
tion of Saugus, from 1893 to 1902, 302 

Table No. 24. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Nashua River above the Tempo- 
rary Dam at Clinton 303 

Table No. 25 — Chemical Examinations of Water from Framingham Reservoir No. 3, . . 304 

Table No. 26. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, 305 

Table No. 27. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, .... 306 
Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet at the State House, Boston, 307 
Table No. 29. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, 1902 308 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, from 1888 to 1902, 309 
Table No. 31. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 1902, 309 
Table No. 32. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, 

1902 311 



viii CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Appendix No. 3 — Cuncliul< </. 

Table No. 33. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works} 

1902, 313 

Tabic Xo. 34. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water I'ipes and Connections owned 

and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and Number of 

Valves in Same 314 

Table Xo. 35. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes laid to January 1, 

1903, owned and operated by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, 315 
Table Xo. 36. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 

Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . . 316 
Table No. 37. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities and 

Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works 317 

Appendix Xo. 4. — Summary of Statistics for the Year 1902, 318 

Appendix Xo. 5. — Legislation of the Year 1902 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board, 321 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Water Tower in Quincy Frontispiece. 

W'aehusett Dam — Up-stream Side, View of Dam with Gap for Passage of Floods ; in Background, 

Granite Abutment and Piers for Railroad Viaduct, 6 

Weston Aqueduct — 7^-foot Steel Pipe at Happy Hollow Siphon in Wayland, .... 16 
High-level Sewer — Xut Island and Bar, before Beginning of Work and after Construction of Em- 
bankment and Grading of Island, 52 

Wachusett Reservoir — Heavy Riprap and Gravel Facing on the Xorth Dike, 86 

Map showing Relocation of Central Massachusetts Railroad, 92 

Wachusett Dam — Down-stream Side, View of Dam and Substructure of Gate Chamber, . . 106 

Wachusett Dam — Substructure of Lower Gate Chamber and Power House, 108 

Lake Cochituate — Improvement of Pegan Brook Meadow when nearly completed, . . . 124 
Weston Aqueduct — Siphon Chamber Castings at Connection of Masonry Aqueduct and 7 '^ -foot 

Steel Pipes in Way land, 138 

Weston Aqueduct — Crushing, Screening and Concrete Mixing Plant, 144 

60-inch Pipe Line through Rock Trench in Medford 158 

60-inch Pipe Lines under Charles River in Weston and Newton, 160 

High-level Sewer — Bringing Outfall Pipe off Nut Island into Position for Lowering, . . . 218 
Blgb. level Sewer — Lowering of Outlet for Outfall Pipe off Nut Island into Bed in Harbor, . . 220 
High-level Sewer — Rock Tunnel in Hyde Park — Steel Ribs and Concrete Lining, .... 236 
High-level Sewer — Tunnel in Jamaica Plain built with Compressed Air. Metallic Roof sup- 
ported on Needle Beam 240 



Metropolitan Watee and Seweeage Boaed. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Bepresenlalives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has 
already presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account 
of its doings, receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and lia- 
bilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1902, and now 
presents a detailed statement of its operations for the year, being its 

SECOND ANNUAL EEPORT. 

The Metropolitan Water Board and the Board of Metropolitan 
Sewerage Commissioners were consolidated on March 20, 1901, and 
statements of the previous operations upon the Metropolitan Water 
Works and upon the Metropolitan Sewerage Works are embraced 
in the six annual reports of the Metropolitan Water Board and in 
the twelve annual reports of the Metropolitan Sewerage Commis- 
sioners, made prior to the date of consolidation. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

(1) Board, Officers and Employes. 

The membership of the Board has continued as last year ; namely, 
Henry H. Sprague, chairman, Henry P. Walcott, M.D., and James 
A. Bailey, Jr. William N. Davenport has continued as secretary 
and executive officer of the Board, and Alfred F. Bridgman as 
auditor and purchasing agent. 

The administrative office force has comprised a book-keeper, two 
assistant book-keepers, an assistant in auditing, a paymaster, a 
supply clerk, three general clerks, four stenographers, a telephone 
operator, two messengers, a janitor and a watchman. 

Alfred C. Vinton, conveyancer, and George D. Bigelow, assistant 
conveyancer, have continued in charge of the work of conveyancing 



l> METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

of the Board. They have been assisted by Miss Alline E. Marty, 
title examiner, by one stenographer, and by Miss Celia M. Tibbetts, 
who is employed a part of the time for service at the Worcester 
Registry of Deeds. 

Frederic P. Stearns has continued as chief engineer of the Board, 
with special charge of the Water Works, and Joseph P. Davis, 
Alphonse Fteley and Hiram F. Mills are still retained to act as con- 
sulting engineers when their services are required. 

For the Water Works the following have also been in charge of the 
various departments: Dexter Brackett, engineer of the Distribution 
Department ; Thomas F. Richardson, engineer of the Dam and 
Aqueduct Department ; Hiram A. Miller, engineer of the Reservoir 
Department ; Horace Ropes, engineer of the Weston Aqueduct 
Department. Alfred D. Flinn occupied the position of principal 
office assistant until his resignation on October 6, 1902, when the 
position was taken by Frank T. Daniels. 

Desmond FitzGerald was in charge of the Sudbury Department 
until November 15, when, on account of ill health, his resignation 
as engineer of the department was accepted. Mr. FitzGerald, who 
had for a long period of years been closely identified with the con- 
struction and maintenance of the Boston Water Works, was, upon 
the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, placed in charge 
of construction and maintenance in the Sudbury Department, aud he 
has given a valuable and distinguished service, both to the city of 
Boston and the whole Metropolitan District. 

The engineering force employed on the Water Works, in construc- 
tion and maintenance, has, upon the average during the year, com- 
prised, in addition, 12 division engineers, 26 assistant engineers, 
and others in various engineering capacities and as sanitary inspect- 
ors, clerks, stenographers and messengers, to the number of 154, — 
in all, 192. The maximum engineering force employed at any one 
time during the year on construction and maintenance was 236. 

There have also been employed inspectors, other than engineering 
inspectors, to the maximum number of 27. Day -labor forces under 
the general supervision of the engineers and the immediate direction 
of foremen, varying in numbers from time to time, have been em- 
ployed in pipe laying, in general improvements and repairs and in 
the performance of minor operations. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

In addition, a regular maintenance force has been required at the 
pumping stations and upon the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and 
other works, numbering upon the average during the year 179. This 
force at the end of the year numbered 202, and was distributed among 
the various departments as follows : Distribution Department, 97 ; 
Dam and Aqueduct Department, 10 ; Sudbury Department, 94 ; 
Reservoir Department, 1. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts by the 
various contractors upon the Water Works during the year was for 
the week ending August 2, when the number amounted to 3,894. 

William M. Brown, engineer of the Sewerage Works, has been in 
charge of both construction and maintenance upon these works. 

He has been assisted by 6 division engineers, who have been in 
charge of the various sections of sewer construction, 14 assistant 
engineers, and 90 others, who are employed in various engineering 
capacities, and as clerk, stenographer and messenger in the depart- 
ment. The maximum engineering force employed at any one time 
during the year on construction and maintenance of the Sewerage 
Works was 110. 

There have also been employed inspectors, other than engineering 
inspectors, to the maximum number of 24. Day-labor forces, under 
the general supervision of the engineers and the immediate direction 
of foremen, have been employed in the construction of the tunnel 
forming a part of Section 73 in Jamaica Plain, on Section 67 in the 
pipe crossing of Stony Brook in Hyde Park, and on Section 64 in 
the crossing of the Neponset River in Hyde Park and Milton, all for 
the High-level sewer, and in other minor work. 

The regular maintenance force required for the pumping stations, 
sewers and other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of engineers 
and day-labor construction forces before enumerated, has upon the 
average numbered 87. This force at the end of the year numbered 
86, and was distributed between the two departments as follows : 
North Metropolitan System, 72 ; South Metropolitan System, 14. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts by the 
various contractors upon the Sewerage Works during the year was 
for the week ending August 9, 1902, when the number amounted to 
1,577. 



4 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(2) Offices and Buildings. 

The office of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board is in 
the buildings numbered 1 and 3 Ashburton Place, at the corner of 
Somerset Street. In these buildings are also located the offices of 
the secretary, the auditor and the conveyancers, and the maip engi- 
neering office of the Metropolitan Water Works. The engineering 
department of the Sewerage Works occupies rooms in the Pernber- 
ton Building in Pemberton Square. 

The headquarters of the Wachusett Reservoir and Wachusett Dam 
and Aqueduct departments of the Water Works have been main- 
tained in the office building in Clinton. Branch offices of the 
Wachusett Reservoir Department have been maintained, one at the 
Xorth Dike in Clinton, one at Sawyer's Mills in Boylston, and two 
in West Boylston, and a fifth was established in April in Oakdale. 
For the work of the Wachusett Dam and Aqueduct Department a 
branch office has been maintained at the dam. The main office of 
the Western Aqueduct Department has remained in Saxon ville, and 
branch offices have been located in Framingham Centre, Wayland 
and Weston. Headquarters of the Distribution and Sudbury de- 
partments have been maintained in Boston. For the Sudbury 
Department a branch office has been maintained at South Framing- 
ham. The headquarters for distribution of the maintenance depart- 
ment of the Water Works in the northern part of the District have 
been in buildings in the Glenwood Pipe Yard in Medford, where 
there are offices, shops, store rooms and stables. The maintenance 
force for the southern portion of the District has its headquarters 
in buildings at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

There are also maintained, in connection with the Water Works, 
the Chestnut Hill high-service and low-service pumping stations ; 
the Spot Pond, Arlington and West Roxbury pumping stations ; the 
Clinton sewerage pumping station at Clinton ; the Mystic pumping 
station at Medford, not now operated ; as well as the gate-houses at 
the several reservoirs, dwellings for attendants, and various other 
buildings for operating purposes. 

There have been maintained, in connection with the construction 
of the Sewerage Works, branch engineering offices at East Milton, 
Hyde Park and Hough's Neck, and, for a portion of the year, at 
Forest Hills. In addition to the above, twenty-two portable booths 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

have been in use along the line of the work. For the operation of 
the works there have been maintained the Deer Island, Charlestown, 
East Boston, Alewife Brook and Quincy pumping stations. 

(3) Conveyancing. 

The larger part of the work of the conveyancers of the Board has 
been devoted to the settlements of claims for damages, of which a 
larger number has been made than in any previous year. The titles 
to the estates on account of which settlements have been effected 
have been brought up to date, and the various papers have been 
drafted. The larger part of these settlements referred to lands in 
Sterling and West Boylston, for which depreciation was claimed ; 
to lands taken for, or affected by building, the Weston Aqueduct ; 
and to the relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad. 

Settlement has been effected in 158 cases, for which titles were 
completed and the necessary papers drafted. Of these settlements, 
147 were made on account of the Water Works, and 11 on account 
of the Sewerage Works. The 147 cases on account of the Water 
Works affected 3,147.929 acres, and the 11 cases on account of the 
Sewerage Works affected 5.365 acres. Of the cases which were 
considered, 18 were pending settlement on January. 1, 1903. 

A great deal of work has also been required to be done in con- 
nection with the Attorney-General's office, in the preparation of 
reports upon titles prior to the trial of cases in court. Reports 
were made to the Attorne}^-General in 75 cases. 

There have been drafted 17 instruments of takings of lands and 
rights in lands, — 15 for the Water Works and 2 for the Sewerage 
Works. Of these takings, 8 were of easements for the construction 
of pipe lines, 3 of lands for the Weston Aqueduct, 2 of lands for 
the Wachasett Reservoir, 1 each for the relocation of the Central 
Massachusetts Railroad and for the Spot Pond Improvement, and 2 
for the High-level sewer. 

There have also been drafted 3 locations of roads and 3 discon- 
tinuances of roads. 

A detailed statement of the various takings and settlements is 
given hereafter. 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



II. WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 
(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir. 

(a) Wachusett Dam. 

During the }^ear 1901 excavation for the bed of the structure had 
been completed, and masonry had been laid to the extent of more 
than 28,000 cubic yards and had reached the height of about 40 feet 
above the bed rock. During the past year more than 65,000 cubic 
yards of rubble-stone masonry have been laid, and the dam has 
reached in general a height above the bed rock of 96 feet. 

There has been considerable excavation made for extending the 
masonry into the banks in cut-offs on both sides of the valley. 

The cast-iron pipes, which pass through the dam from the upper 
to the lower gate-chambers, have been put in place. The founda- 
tions of the lower gate-chamber and power house have been com- 
pleted, and the pipes which are to extend through the lower chamber 
to the circular pool below the dam, as well as the pool itself, have 
been largely constructed. 

The dam has been carried to such a height that it has been neces- 
sary to remove the large flume and waste-way, which had been 
originally constructed, and also to remove a part of the smaller 
flume which carried the water, from the temporary dam into the 
head of the Wachusett Aqueduct. The water is now introduced 
into the aqueduct by way of the pipes carried through the dam and 
the lower gate chamber ; and the overflow or waste from the river 
must now pass over a portion of the dam which has been carried to 
a less height than the remainder of the structure. It is still possible 
to regulate the height of the water in the river at the temporary dam. 

(b) Wachusett Reservoir. 

The stripping and removal of the soil from the bottom of the 
Wachusett Reservoir has been carried on during the year principally 
within the limits of the town of Boylston. The stripping has, how- 
ever, extended somewhat into the easterly part of the town of West 
Boylston ; and small areas in the westerly part of the reservoir in 
West Boylston, and also in the town of Clinton, have been stripped 
during the year. 

The work of building the North Dike has been continued, and the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 7 

main cut-off trench as well as the secondary cut-off trench have been 
substantially completed. The larger part of the material required 
for the extended embankment upon the land side has been deposited, 
and considerable progress has been made in depositing gravel upon 
the water slopes of the dike, as well as riprap for their immediate 
protection against the wave action of the water. 

It is estimated that more than 90 per cent, of the total amount of 
soil filling which is required for the North Dike has been already 
deposited. 

In stripping the land which is to be submerged in the reservoir, 
it is expected to remove the soil from 4,200 acres, requiring the re- 
moval, as is estimated, of G, 900,000 cubic yards of earth. During 
the year 1902, 715 acres were stripped, from which were removed 
1,246,931 cubic yards. The soil has now been removed from nearly 
68 per cent, of the entire area to be stripped, and about 70 per cent, 
of the whole amount of soil has been removed. 

The contracts which have been made in the past and preceding 
years have provided for the removal of substantially all the soil, 
there being excepted only a small quantity about the margins of the 
Oakdale mill pond at the extreme upper end, and in the easterly 
portion of the reservoir where soil is to be used for the construction 
of the South Dike. 

The contracts provide that the stripping of the most remote and 
highest portions of the bed of the reservoir shall be completed on or 
before November 1, 1905. 

A small portion of the soil has been removed in carts, but the 
larger portion has been loaded directly into cars, or first loaded into 
carts and dumped into cars at dumping platforms. The larger part 
of the soil, constituting 93 per cent, of the amount removed, has been 
carried by locomotives to the North Dike. The remainder has been 
used for highway and railroad embankments, and for filling small 
shallow flowage areas. In the few places where muck has been 
found at a depth so great that it was not feasible or necessary to re- 
move it, it has been covered with gravel or sand. 

The houses which have remained standing in the reservoir site 
have, in general, been rented during the year to employes of the 
Board or to contractors engaged upon the work, and a considerable 
income has been gained from this source. The progress of the 
work, however, requires the gradual removal of the buildings. Dur- 
ing the past year 35 dwelling houses, 11 barns, 5 shops, 4 stores, 1 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

mill and 3 halls — a total of 59 buildings in West Boylston — have 
been torn down or removed, making a total of 209 destroyed or re- 
moved since the beginning of the work in that town. During the 
year, also, the dams formerly belonging to the West Boylston Man- 
ufacturing Company, the two dams of the L. M. Harris Manufacturing 
Company, and the dam of the Rice and Cowee mills, have been re- 
moved. 

Trees and bushes have been cut in many places along the margin 
of the land purchased by the Board, so as to establish a fire guard 40 
feet wide as a protection against the spread of fire. The trees and 
brush were removed during the past year for a distance of 1.49 
miles, which is in addition to the 13.49 miles from which they had 
been removed for a fire guard in previous years. 

A large number of seedlings, principally white pine, maple, oak 
and chestnut, have been raised in the two nurseries which have been 
established upon the lands of the Commonwealth, and a beginning 
has been made in transplanting these to open tracts about the margin 
of the reservoir. 

(c) Location, Construction and Discontinuance of Roads. 

Changes in grade have been made in South Main Street, where it 
is to cross the relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad, and 
slight changes in both location and grade have been made in the 
South Meadow Road, in order to avoid a crossing of this railroad. 
Provision has been made for an overhead railroad crossing of Boyl- 
ston Street near the dam. Changes have also been effected in the 
road running from West Berlin to Boylston, in order to avoid a 
grade crossing on the line of the relocation of the railroad in West 
Berlin. 

Plans have been completed for the continuation of the road which 
runs from Clinton to West Boylston, from the point in the village 
of West Boylston to which the location had been fixed, to and 
through the village of Oakdale, and it is expected that the location 
will be definitely determined and agreed upon at an early date. 

Considerable progress has been effected in the building of the road 
in West Boylston which is to extend from Worcester Street, on the 
southerly side of the reservoir, across the reservoir to the junction 
of Sterling and Lancaster streets on the northerly side, and a con- 
tract has been made for the building of the high embankments which 
are required. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



9 



During the year, Harris Street in West Boylston and the portion 
of Holden Street which lies between Harris Street and North Main 
Street have been discontinued. 

The following is a list of roads which have been relocated or 
altered, with dates of the determinations made, since the beginning 
of the construction of the Wachusett Reservoir : — 

Location of Roads. 



No. 



LOCATION. 



Description. 



Date of 
Acceptance. 



Boylston, 



Boylston and Clin- 
ton. 



Clinton, . 



West Boylston and 
Boylston. 



10 



11 



Clinton and 
ling. 



Ster- 



Sterling and West 
Boylston. 



Clinton, . 



West Boylston, 



Clinton, 



Berlin, 



Road running from the point of discontinuance of the River 
Road in Boylston, northeasterly across the schoolhouse 
road, to road to Northborough, at land of Janet L. Miller. 

Road running in continuation of preceding road, from the 
northeasterly end thereof in Boylston, northerly across the 
railroad, the road to Berlin, and the Clinton boundary line, 
into, through and westerly of Boylston Street, to its junc- 
tion with River Street. 

Road (temporary) running from South Main Street, near land 
of Kittredge, westerly, across Coachlace Pond, to South 
Meadow Road. 

Road (as modified by decree of Highway Commissioners) run- 
ning from the junction of Temple Street and Worcester 
State highway, in West Boylston, easterly along Temple 
Street to Pierce Street, then southerly across Dover Road, 
the Boylston boundary line and road from Worcester to 
Boylston, to junction of School Street and 8outh Road, and 
then along School Street to road to Shrewsbury. 

Road running from South Main Street in Clinton, at land of 
George A. Dorrison, westerly across Coachlace Pond, and 

. southwesterly across South Meadow Road and Sterling 
boundary line, to land of late Thomas H. O'Connor. 

Road from the southwesterly end of the preceding road in 
Sterling, westerly across the road to Sawyer's Mills, and 
southwesterly across the West Boylston boundary line, to 
Lancaster Street at land of Olive A. Hager. Also regrad- 
ing and partial widening of Lancaster Street to Beaman 
Street. 

Addition to the new Road No. 2 at land late of Thomas 
Pendergast on the westerly side of Boylston Street, to in- 
clude outlet of culvert. 

Road running from Lancaster Street, at junction of Beaman 
and Sterling streets, southwesterly through Fletcher Street 
and Howe Street, across East Main 8treet, Nashua River, 
Central Massachusetts Railroad, Prospect Street, Holbrook 
Street, and Worcester, Nashua & Rochester Railroad, and 
then southeasterly to Worcester Street, together with 
branch from Howe Street, parallel with East Main Street, 
to land of George H. Holmes, and branch northwesterly to 
Prospect Street, adjoining the Worcester, Nashua & Roches- 
ter Railroad. 

Overgrade railroad crossing at Boylston Street; overgrade 
crossing over Road No. 5, near South Meadow Road; and 
undergrade crossing of Road No. 5 at land formerly of John 
W. Bigelow et als. t together with changes of grade; and a 
new way from the South Meadow Road southeasterly to 
Road No. 5, — on account of relocation of Central Massa- 
chusetts Railroad. 

Road running from the Boylston Road in West Berlin, north- 
westerly and then southwesterly across the relocation of 
the Central Massachusetts Railroad back to the Boylston 
Road, through land of Jonas H. Carter, — on account of re- 
location of Central Massachusetts Railroad. 



June 15, 1897. 



April 12, 1898. 



June 2, 1898. 



May 6, 1899. 



Dec. 27, 1898. 



Feb. 21,1899. 



Feb. 21,1899. 



Nov. 19, 1901. 



July 22, 1902. 



Sept. 9, 1902. 



10 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

During the year 1902 only two roads have been discontinued on 
account of the work of construction in the Wachusett Reservoir, as 
follows : — 





No. LOCATION. 


Description 


Date of Dis- 
continuance. 


11 


West Boylston, . 


(1) Harris Street in Oakdale, extending from North Main 
Street to Holden Street. 

(2) Part of Holden Street between North Main Street and 
Harris Street. 


June 26, 1902. 





Lists of roads discontinued prior to the year 1902 have been 
published in earlier reports. 

(d) Relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad. 

On April 3, 1902, the Board, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Water Act, completed an agreement with the board of directors of 
the Boston & Maine Railroad, for the discontinuance of that portion 
of the Central Massachusetts Division of the railroad which runs 
through the site of the Wachusett Reservoir, and for the relocation 
and construction of the railroad from West Berlin to Oakdale in 
West Boylston, along the northern side of the reservoir. 

The new location determined upon, after leaving a point near the 
crossing of the Central Massachusetts Railroad over the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad in West Berlin, passes over the 
highway leading to Boylston, and thence, proceeding northerly, 
follows in general the course of Berlin Street in Berlin ; and, cross- 
ing the town line into Clinton, proceeds for about 1,500 feet in the 
same general course, then turns to the left and passes under the 
Clam Shell Road ; and thence by a tunnel under Wilson Street, 
1,110 feet long, comes to a point near Boylston Street, which it 
crosses overhead ; and thence is carried by a high steel viaduct, 
supported upon granite masonry piers, across the Nashua River just 
below the Wachusett Dam, and passes along the shore of the reser- 
voir and the North Dike, to a junction with the Worcester, Nashua 
& Rochester Railroad, at a point about 9,631 feet westerly from the 
present Clinton station on that railroad. A branch line also runs 
from the main line at the North Dike, upon a curve to the Worcester, 
Nashua & Rochester Railroad, in order to provide for running trains 
to the passenger station in Clinton. It was provided that the land 
should be taken for this portion of the route, and that its construe- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 11 

tion .should be undertaken by the Board. This section to be built is 
3.92 miles in length, and the branch line toward the Clinton station 
is 0.77 of a mile. 

It is agreed that the Board shall be relieved from constructing a 
railroad from the junction with the Worcester, Nashua & Rochester 
Railroad to a point in the village of Oakdale, in West Boylston y 
300 feet south of the arch where the Stillwater River passes under 
the railroad, a distance of 4.40 miles, as the trains on the Central 
Massachusetts Railroad will, for a period at least, run for that dis- 
tance upon the tracks of the other railroad. 

From the above point in Oakdale it is provided that the tracks of 
the Worcester, Nashua & Rochester Railroad shall be relocated and 
reconstructed through the village of Oakdale to a point 350 feet 
beyond and south of the existing crossing of that railroad and the 
Central Massachusetts Railroad, and that new connections between 
the railroads shall be constructed. There is also required a consid- 
erable reconstruction of the highways in Oakdale, which are to be 
built over the railroads, so that steel bridges with considerable spans 
are to be provided. This portion, having a length of 0.55 of a mile, 
is also to be built by the Board. 

The entire length of the relocation will be 8.87 miles, and the 
new location will be but one-third of a mile longer than the portion 
discontinued. The new location is shown on an accompanying plan. 

In rebuilding, the Board will construct no crossings at grade, and 
by the relocation seven grade crossings upon the discontinued por- 
tions of the Central Massachusetts Railroad and one grade crossing 
at Oakdale upon the Worcester, Nashua & Rochester Railroad will 
be abolished. 

The corporation is to release to the Commonwealth all the lands, 
buildings, bridges and other structures embraced within the limits 
of the portion of the railroad location in the reservoir which is to 
be discontinued ; to reimburse the Commonwealth for the construc- 
tion of the branch line to Clinton ; and to assume all obligations 
which may arise by reason of the failure of the Board to build a 
separate line of railroad between the points in Clinton and Oakdale 
before mentioned, and, in general, from other liabilities imposed 
upon the Board and the Commonwealth by the Metropolitan Water 
Act. In consideration of such release and agreement, the Common- 
wealth is to pay the corporation the sum of $187,000. 



12 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Owing to the delay which necessarily occurred in reaching a de- 
termination with the officers of the Boston & Maine Railroad, it was 
necessary to enter upon the work as vigorously as possible after the 
agreement had been made. The required surveys had been mostly 
completed, and preparations were at once made for the taking of the 
necessary pieces of land required in Berlin and Clinton, and for 
completing the contracts and doing the work. 

Much of the engineering and construction required is of a pecu- 
liarly difficult character ; this is especially the case where the railroad 
crosses the Nashua River just below the dam. There is easterly of 
the river a tunnel 1,110 feet long; a steel trestle bridge 917 feet 
long, with nine spans, crosses the river at a height of 133 feet ; 
then comes a rock cut having a maximum depth of 56 feet ; and, 
for a considerable distance beyond, the route follows the line of the 
North Dike. It was necessary to arrange the contracts for building 
these portions so that the work could be carried along in connection 
with the building of the dam and dike. 

The work in Oakdale requires a general rearrangement of the rail- 
roads and highways, as well as high embankments and considerable 
bridges. 

The contracts provide that the relocation shall be completed in 
April of this year, and the work has been so speedily carried on that 
it is believed that it will be possible to change the running of the 
trains at some time in the coming spring. 

(e) Clinton Catholic Cemetery. 

By reason of the more complete excavations made upon the site 
of the St. John's Catholic Cemetery, additional bodies have been 
found, and have been removed by the representatives of the cemetery 
association. There seems to be no question but that all the bodies 
have now been removed. The total number of bodies which have 
been removed from the cemetery is 3,902. 

Although the work of the removal of the bodies from the St. John's 
Catholic Cemetery in Clinton, which was included within the limits 
of the Wachusett Reservoir, to the new cemetery in the town of 
Lancaster, was substantially completed in the year 1900, a final set- 
tlement has not been reached under the tripartite agreement between 
the Board, the Roman Catholic Bishop of Springfield and the St. 
John's Catholic Cemetery Association. There is a balance due, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 13 

which the Board for a considerable period has been ready to pay in 
accordance with the agreement ; and it has been likewise ready to 
convey the lands held by it, and included within the new cemetery 
lot, to the St. John's Catholic Cemetery Association, as called for, on 
the conveyance to the Commonwealth of the old cemetery lot and a 
release of all claims and damages as provided. 

(f) Sanitary Inspection of Watershed. 

Progress has been made in the work of improving the sanitary con- 
dition at various mills and dwelling houses situated in the Wachusett 
watershed. At several mills cesspools have been placed, and other 
construction has been carried on. 

The camps which have been constructed for laborers, and the vari- 
ous buildings in which the laborers upon the work have been lodged, 
have been subject to inspection by Dr. J. J. Goodwin, and by con- 
stant effort they have been kept in a fairly clean condition. 

(2) Improvement of Lake Cochituate. 

The work of improving the condition of the portions of Lake 
Cochituate known as Snake Brook Meadow and as Pegan Brook 
Meadow, under the requirements of chapter 509 of the Acts of the 
year 1901, has been substantially completed. The Act required 
that the meadows should be cleaned and excavated to a level of prac- 
tically 10.33 feet below high water in the lake, provided, however, 
that the amount to be expended for this purpose should be limited to 
$100,000, and that the improvements should be effected on or before 
June 14, 1903. 

(a) Snake Brook Meadow. 

The work of improving the Snake Brook Meadow was carried on 
during the year 1901, and nearly finished. The gravel facing of the 
embankments, which remained to be done, was finished in January 
of last year. Considerable work had to be done on account of 
the settling of the slopes in regrading the embankments which had 
been completed late in the previous year. As it was found that the 
excavation could not be carried in the two meadows to a level of 
10.33 feet below high water in the lake, the excavation of mud from 
the Snake Brook Meadow was carried to a depth of 9 feet. The 
cost of this portion of the work, however, was somewhat less than 
had been anticipated. 



14 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(6) Pegan Brook Meadow. 

A temporary dam was built, and a main ditch for the drainage of 
the meadow was begun in the previous year, in order that the bed 
of the meadow might be made ready for the excavation and removal 
of the mud as early as possible in the season. Active operations for 
the removal of the mud were begun in May. For its removal, 
wheelbarrows, carts and cars were put into requisition, according to 
the peculiar conditions of the various places. The contractor com- 
pleted his work on December 20. 

Nothing now remains to be done under the requirements of the 
Act except the small amount of cleaning and trimming up which is 
naturally done at the beginning of the season following the con- 
struction. Inasmuch as the work upon the Snake Brook Meadow 
was completed at a somewhat less cost than was estimated, the 
excavation of Pegan Brook Meadow was carried to a somewhat 
greater extent, and reached a depth of about 9.8 feet. It is prob- 
able, however, that this excavation was made rather too deep, and 
that the total cost of the improvement will very slightly exceed the 
sum of $100,000. 

(c) Improvement of Pegan Brook Filtration System. 

In connection with the improvement of the Pegan Brook Meadow, 
as required by the Act of the Legislature, it was thought advisable 
to better the system by which the water received from Pegan Brook 
and its vicinity is filtered before entering the lake. An intercepting 
ditch, about 3,000 feet long, to receive the smaller brooks and sur- 
face drainage, lias been constructed about the eastern edge of the 
embankment made in the improvement of the meadow. This inter- 
cepting ditch leads from the small pond north of Kansas Street, 
which has been enlarged and included in the system as an equalizing 
reservoir, to a receiving reservoir which has been constructed, hav- 
ing a capacity of about 1,000,000 gallons, and which is located near 
the mouth of Pegan Brook. A new pumping station is to be con- 
structed near the reservoir, at which the water collected from the 
brook and the intercepting ditch will be pumped into the existing 
filter beds. 



^o. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 15 

(3) Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir. 

It has been necessary to push as fast as possible the operations 
upon the Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir, in order that they may 
be completed during the present year. 

The character of the work has been such that many difficulties 
have been encountered. 

The tunnels, of which there are five, have offered peculiar diffi- 
culties, inasmuch as for considerable distances, where solid rock 
was anticipated, the surface of the rock was found to exist at vary- 
ing heights between the floor and roof of the tunnel. Strong and 
careful timbering was required, and the advance was consequently 
slow and costly. The aggregate length of the tunnels is 2.3 miles, 
and the excavation has been carried to the extent of 2.1 miles. 

In crossing the valley of the Sudbury River, and of Happy Hol- 
low, so called, in Wayland, riveted steel siphon pipes, 7 % f ee t i n 
diameter, have been laid, in order to avoid the building of the 
high embankments and bridges which would be required to carry a 
masonry conduit across the valleys. Three lines of these pipes 
will ultimately be required, but at present only one is laid, as that 
will meet the requirements of the District for a considerable period 
to come. The length of the line across the river is 3,606 feet, and 
that across Happy Hollow is 1,125 feet. 

At the beginning of the past year nearly one-quarter part in 
length of the aqueduct had been built, and nearly one-half of the 
entire length has been constructed during the year. 

The building of the foundations for the four siphon chambers, for 
two of the gaging chambers, and for the large terminal chamber at 
the end of the aqueduct in Weston near the Charles River, has been 
carried on during the past year, and contracts have been made for 
building the superstructures. 

Somewhat less progress has so far been made upon the equalizing 
reservoir, which is in process of construction near the easterly or 
lower end of the aqueduct in the town of Weston. The reservoir 
and open channel approaching it have an area of 66.6 acres, and the 
reservoir when completed will have a capacity exceeding 200,000,000 
gallons. As the soil and other material are removed from the bed 
of the reservoir and open channel, a total excavation, estimated at 
651,200 cubic yards of material, will be required. The amount 



16 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

already excavated is 239,000 cubic yards, or 37 per cent, of the 
whole. 

The dam at the outlet of the reservoir, which has a length of 900 
feet, and is built with a concrete core wall and earth embankments, 
has been about one-half completed. 

The large amount of earth excavated, which has to be disposed 
of in embankments and mounds, has been deposited under the 
direction of Olmsted Brothers, landscape architects. 

A careful inspection has been made of the various camps in which 
the laborers have their lodgings, and a fair sanitary condition has 
been maintained. 

' The various contracts require the completion of the work by the 
end of the coming summer, and it is believed that it will be possible 
to put the aqueduct into use at some time during the latter part of 
the year. 

When completed, the aqueduct will have a total length of 13.44 
miles, and a capacity for carrying 300,000,000 gallons of water 
per day. 

The total amount expended for all purposes on account of the 
construction of the aqueduct and reservoir, including the pipe lines 
extending from the terminal chamber, up to January 1, 1903, has 
been $1,985,550.32, of which $1,562,946.76 have been expended 
during the past year. It was estimated, before the work was begun, 
that the entire cost of the aqueduct proper and reservoir, includ- 
ing the pipe lines, would be $5,000,000. 

(4) Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe at Quincy. 

The masonry tower, which surrounds j;he steel standpipe erected 
in connection with the reservoir at Forbes Hill in Quincy, was com- 
pleted in July of last year, at a cost, exclusive of engineering, of 
$26,120. The tower is circular, built of uncoursed granite masonry 
from the Quincy quarries, with cut-stone trimmings, and surmounted 
by battlements. It has an outside diameter, in general, of 43 feet, 
an inside diameter of 3 6% feet, and a height of 77 feet to the con- 
tinuous line of the embattlements. At the top of the tower there 
is a granolithic roof, 260 feet above Boston City Base, which is 
accessible to the public. The top of the tower, which is reached by 
a staircase between the standpipe and surrounding masonry tower, 
affords an extensive view of the surrounding country. 



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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 17 

(5) Bear Hill Reservoir. 

The Bear Hill Reservoir, which is situated about one-half of a 
mile west from Spot Pond, and which has been built in order to 
furnish water to the town of Stoneham at a greater pressure than 
would be supplied by the Fells Reservoir, was completed in June 
of the past year. The reservoir was constructed in a depression on 
the rocky ridge which forms the summit of Bear Hill. The dams 
were built at each end of the depression, of Portland cement con- 
crete, supported by embankments of earth and loose rock. The 
earth and rock in the site of the reservoir were excavated to a maxi- 
mum depth of about 15 feet. The reservoir has an area of about 
three-quarters of an acre, has a capacity of 2,450,000 gallons, and 
has an elevation, when full, of 300 feet above the Boston City Base. 
The superstructure of the small gate chamber will be built during 
the coming season. 

The cost of the construction of the reservoir was $28,411.40. 

(6) Pipe Laying. 

The second pipe line to connect the Chestnut Hill pumping station 
and Spot Pond has been finished by the laying of 3.06 miles of 48- 
inch and 60-inch pipe, in Medford, from a point near Tufts College 
to Spot Pond. The line, as far as the southerly boundary of the 
Middlesex Fells, is of 48-inch pipes, and thence to Spot Pond is of 
60-inch pipes. The pipes are laid through Wright's Pond in Med- 
ford, which was emptied in order to facilitate the work. For the 
larger part of the distance between Wright's Pond and Spot Pond 
it was necessary to cut a trench, principally through rock, at a 
depth of from 15 to 22 feet. The trench, however, has been cut 
wide enough to admit in the future another line of pipes. 

There are now two separate main pipe lines connecting Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir and Spot Pond. 

It has been necessary, in order to supply the higher portions of 
Milton with water at a sufficient pressure, to lay a 12-inch pipe line 
in Hyde Park from the West Roxbury boundary line to and across 
the Neponset River and to the Milton boundary line. By this pipe 
line the high service of Milton will be supplied from the pumping 
station and standpipe of the West Roxbury high service. The 
length of this line is about 8,800 feet. 



18 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Several pipe lines will ultimately be required for conveying the 
water, from the terminus of the Weston Aqueduct in Weston, into 
the different portions of the Metropolitan Water District. 

Contracts have been made and the work has been well advanced 
for the laying of a line of 60-inch cast-iron pipes from the terminal 
chamber, across the Charles River, an entire length of 1,920 feet. 
Under the river, however, for a distance of about 350 feet, three 
60-inch lines were laid at the same time, two of these being intended 
lor use in the future, as they may be demanded. 

A line of 48-inch pipes is in process of being laid from the ter- 
minus of the 60-inch pipe in Newton, through the Commonwealth 
Avenue Boulevard, and through various other streets and private 
lands, to Commonwealth Avenue in Brighton, and thence, in the 
southerly roadway, to the easterly end of Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 
where it will be connected with the mains leading toward the cen- 
tral portions of Boston. About 26,779 feet of this line have been 
laid during the past year. The work has been more costly than 
estimated, on account of the necessity of so modifying the plans as 
to avoid future interference with the surface drainage svstem of the 
city of Newton, as well as the necessity of a large amount of rock 
excavation. The work of resurfacing the roadways in the Newton 
Boulevard is done by the street department of the city of Newton, 
at the expense of the Commonwealth. 

(7) Improvement of Spot Pond Brook. 

Chapter 112 of the Resolves of the General Court of the year 
1902 directed the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board to in- 
vestigate the condition of Spot Pond Brook in Stoneham, Melrose 
and Maiden, to report a plan for such improvements of the brook 
as should provide for the easy and natural flow to tide water of the 
water from Doleful Pond and surrounding country, turned into the 
brook by the Board, and to take into consideration the whole ques- 
tion of the improvement of the brook ; also, if such plan for im- 
provement were found feasible and desirable, to recommend a scheme 
for apportioning the expense of the improvements between the Com- 
monwealth and the towns and cities benefited, and to determine the 
extent, if any, to which betterments should be imposed upon abut- 
ting owners. 

The Board caused investigations to be entered upon by its engi- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 19 

neers at once upon the passage of the resolve, and public hearings 
were given. 

The Board found that Spot Pond Brook had, by the overflowing 
of its banks in times of freshets, caused serious damage in the city 
of Melrose, and more or less injury in the town of Stoneham and 
the city of Maiden ; that the drawing of water from Spot Pond, for 
the water supply of the municipalities of Maiden, Melrose and Med- 
ford, had tended to decrease the freshet flow of recent years prior to 
the taking of the pond for the Metropolitan Water Works in the 
year 1898 ; that, though the present use of the pond as a distributing 
reservoir for the Metropolitan Water Works diverts from the brook 
a considerable portion of the water naturally flowing into the brook, 
the remaining waters of the watershed, from Doleful Pond and its 
vicinity, will tend to a certain extent to restore the condition which 
existed prior to the taking of the water for water supply, and to in- 
crease the flow in the brook above that of recent years preceding the 
year 1898. 

It was, however, the opinion of the Board that the larger element 
in the increase of the flow in times of freshets is the improvement 
of the watershed draining into the brook, by the cultivation of 
unimproved lands, the laying out of streets and of surface drains, 
and the erection of buildings, so that the rain water runs more 
directly and speedily into the brook. 

The Board also found that certain districts, outside the direct line 
of the brook, must sooner or later find a relief in better drainage. 

It therefore appeared to be the duty of the Board to report a 
plan for improvement, not as a temporary device to alleviate press- 
ing and immediate troubles, but to suggest a more extensive scheme, 
which should meet the demands in the district affected which seem 
sure to arise in the near future. 

The plan, prepared by the engineers of the Board and presented 
to the Legislature, proposes the laying of a 20-inch pipe from the 
present outlet, in the town of Stoneham, of the water from Doleful 
Pond and the surrounding country, which now finds its way into 
the brook, to a point in Melrose near Whittier Street, and near the 
place where the brook crosses Wyoming Avenue ; then to build a 
new covered conduit, which shall receive the waters from this pipe 
and also from the brook at this point, and convey them to a point 
which is near the Wyoming railroad station, and also near the junc- 



20 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

tion of Ell Pond Brook with Spot Pond Brook ; thence to construct, 
in general along the present line of the brook to Winter Street in 
Maiden, a wide channel with flat slopes to provide for the freshet 
flows, and a narrower central channel to carry the ordinary flow. 
In Maiden it is proposed to build larger or additional culverts in 
the highways, and to widen the brook, as far as Mountain Avenue, 
sufficiently to carry the freshet flows ; and thence to construct a 
separate covered conduit, through Mountain and Linden avenues 
and through private property, beyond Pleasant Street, to a point at 
tide water in the brook near the present location of the Maiden 
Electric Company's plant. It is proposed to utilize this covered 
conduit for the overflow caused by freshets, and to permit the 
ordinary flow of the brook to continue in the present channel below 
Mountain Avenue. The plan contemplates the deepening of the 
channel of the brook for the entire distance between Whittier Street 
in Melrose and Mountain Avenue in Maiden, so as to enable the 
city of Melrose to provide for the drainage of the low lands along 
the line of the brook, and also, in like manner, both to improve the 
low lands along Ell Pond Brook, and to construct a system of 
drainage which will improve more distant lands not directly con- 
nected with Spot Pond Brook. The diversion of the freshet flow at 
Mountain Avenue in Maiden will relieve the more thickly settled 
and business portions of that city from a pending present danger, 
and from troubles which" must arise from an increasing flow of the 
brook. 

Inasmuch as the proper apportionment of the expenses of the 
improvement seem to involve the prior solution of some difficult 
practical and legal problems, and the determination of the present 
rights enjoyed and of the respective liabilities as to the maintenance 
of the brook, the Board advised that, if the plan for the improvement 
of the brook should be approved, the question of apportioning the 
expenses upon the parties benefited should be referred to the Supreme 
Judicial Court, with power to determine the legal questions involved, 
and, by commissioners or otherwise, to make a proper apportionment 
of the expense incurred, and to determine what abutting owners, if 
any, would receive benefits, and the amount of the betterments which 
should be imposed. 

This report was transmitted to the Legislature on January 14, 
1903. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 21 

(8) Police Protection. 

Police protection has been afforded, in accordance with the re- 
quirements of the Metropolitan Water Act, in places where active 
construction has been carried on. The police officers have been 
appointed by the various towns in which their services have been 
required, and they have been subject to the town authorities in the 
performance of their duties, but they have been paid for their ser- 
vices by the Board. 

For the Wachusett Reservoir district there have been employed 
13 officers in the town of Clinton, 5 officers (reduced to 4 in Octo- 
ber) in the town of Boylston, 1 of whom is mounted, 3 in the town 
of West Boylston, and 1 mounted officer in Sterling. The special 
police officers appointed in the town of Clinton have also been 
appointed special officers in the town of Boylston. The Boylston 
officers have been appointed special officers in the towns of Clinton 
and West Boylston. The West Boylston officers have been made 
special officers in the town of Boylston. The Sterling officer has 
been made a special officer in the towns of Boylston and West 
Boylston . 

Along the line of the Weston Aqueduct, 6 police officers have 
been employed in Framingham, 5 in Wayland and 5 in Weston. 
In Newton, 2 officers have also been paid by the Board. 

(9) Purchases and Takings of Land. 

Substantially all the land required for the Wachusett Reservoir 
has now been either purchased or taken, and in nearly all cases both 
purchases and takings have been made. Considerable additional 
purchases were made during the past year, on account of the im- 
provements to be made in Oakdale by reason of the relocation of 
highways caused by the relocation of the Central Massachusetts 
Railroad. ^ 

Takings of lands in Berlin and Clinton have been made for the 
relocation of the railroad. Some takings have also been made in 
Framingham, Wayland and Weston, in order to complete the acquisi- 
tion of the lands required for the Weston Reservoir and Aqueduct. 

Several takings have been made, both through private land and 
private ways, for the laying of the pipe lines in Newton, Medford 
and Hyde Park, and a small amount of land has been taken in 
Stoneham for the completion of the Spot Pond improvement. 



22 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The takings of real estate for the Metropolitan Water Works 
during the year have numbered 15, affecting an area of 286.199 
acres; 271.426 acres were taken in fee, and easements and other 
rights were taken in 14.773 acres. 

List of Takings for Metropolitan Water Works for the Year 1902. 



LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION. 



Former Owners. 



Recorded. 



Purpose of Taking. 



Weston (both sides of Ash Street and 
southwesterly and westerly from 
Newton Street). Area, 237. 10 acres 
in fee. 

Medford (from Governor Brooks' 
Lane northeasterly to Border Road 
in Middlesex Fells Reservation). 
Area, easements in 0.589 acre; 
temporary rights to occupy 0.880 
acre. 

Berlin and Clinton (from railroad 
bridge in West Berlin westerly to 
westerly line of new location of 
Boy lston Street in Clinton). Area, 
29.74 acres in fee; easements in 
0.32 acre. 

West Boylston (Prospect Street and 
northerly side of new highway). 
Area, 0.046 acre in fee; easements 
in 0.058 acre. 

Framingham (on 8udbury River) . 
Area, 0.55 acre in fee. 

Newton (from Kenrick Street south- 
erly through Magnolia Avenue and 
land of George A. Ward to and 
through old location of Cochituate 
Aqueduct). Area, easements in 
3.360 acres. 

Medford (from Elm and Forest streets 
northerly across Wright's Pond to 
land of the Commonwealth). Area, 
easements in 5.447 acres. 

Hyde Park (from Vose Avenue west- 
erly across Erie Street and New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road and into Neponset River to 
park land of Commonwealth). 
Area, easements in 0.072 acre. 

Newton (on southwesterly side of 
Commonwealth Avenije, north- 
westerly from Rowe Street). Area, 
easements in 0.194 acre. 

Medford (in and adjoining Governor 
Brooks' Lane, from Governor's 
Avenue and Hall Road northerly to 
strip described above in No. 86). 
Area, easements in 0.517 acre; tem- 
porary rights to occupy 0.750 acre. 

Weston (between Loring and River 
streets and easterly from River 
Street to Charles River Reserva- 
tion). Area, 0.627 acre in fee 

Stoneham (westerly side of Wood- 
land Road, near site of Langwood 
Hotel). Area, 1.153 acres in fee. 

Wayland (from Happy Hollow Road 
westerly about2, 100 feet to a brook). 
Area, easements in 1.815 acres. 

Newton (from Magnolia Avenue 
through land of George A. Ward 
et al. to and adjoining old location 
of Cochituate Aqueduct, all adjoin- 
ing part of strip described above in 
No. 90). Area, temporary rights to 
occupy 0.770 acre. 



Marshall L. Upbam et 
al. 



Harry Dutton et al. 
Jonas H. Carters al. 

George W. Reed. 

Katherine S. Cameron. 
George A. Ward et al. 

City of Medford. 



New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad, 
Midland Division, and 
Erie Street. 



Boston & Albany Rail- 
road Company, leased 
to New York Central 
& Hudson River Rail- 
road Company. 

Harry Dutton et al. 



Elmer L. Walker and 
Marion Preston. 



Trustees Langwood 
Park Land Company, 
et al. 

Thomas Irving and 
Anthony Irving. 

George A. Ward et al. 



1902. 

Feb. 12. 



April 10. 

April 28. 

May 6. 

May 9. 

May 28. 

June 2. 

June 4. 

June 4. 

June 24. 

Aug. 5. 

Aug. 18. 

Sept. 13. 

Sept. 29. 



Weston Reservoir and 
Aqueduct. 

Pipe line. 



Relocation of Central 
Massachusetts Rail- 
road, Wachusett 
Reservoir. 



Highway, Wachusett 
Reservoir. 



Weston Aqueduct. 
Pipe line. 



Pipe line. 
Pipe line. 

Pipe line. 
Pipe line. 

Pipe lin«. 

Spot Pond Improve- 
ment. . 

Weston Aqueduct. 
Pipe line. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



23 



List of Takings for Metropolitan Water Works for the Year 1902 

Concluded. 



No. 



LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION 



Former Owners. 



Recorded. 



Purpose of TakiDg. 



99 



WeBt Boylston (easterly side of North 
Mflin Street and southeasterly side 
of Waushacum Street). Area, 2.21 
acres in fee. 



Mary S. Mason. 



1903. 

Oct. 18. 



Wachusett Reservoir. 



Settlement has been effected with the owners of all the land taken 
or purchased by the Board for the Metropolitan Water Works since 
the beginning of operations, aside frOm the works of the cities of 
Maiden, Medford and Melrose, except for 604.08 acres, and in nearly 
all cases affecting private lands purchases have preceded the takings. 
Of the lands taken for the Wachusett Aqueduct, the time for bringing 
suits for two parcels, containing 5.08 acres, has expired. Of the 
lands taken for the Wachusett Reservoir, the time for bringing suits 
for four parcels, containing 27.662 acres, has expired. 

Settlements under purchases and takings, for all purposes of the 
Water Works, have been effected in the past year in 65 cases, 
and for an aggregate of 310.44 acres, with the buildings thereon. 
The sums paid in these settlements have amounted to $181,586.24. 
In only 8 of these cases have the settlements been results of suits 
at law, and the total amount paid in the court settlements has been 
$23,575.58. 

Since the beginning of operations upon the Metropolitan Water 
Works, the number of settlements of this kind effected for the pur- 
poses of the Water Works has amounted to 720; and under them 
the Board has acquired rights, in fee or in easement, in 11,186.28 
acres, or 17.48 square miles, for which an aggregate of $3,637,702.29 
has been paid. Only 17 of these cases have been settled by suits at 
law, and the total amount paid under judgments of the court has 
been $56,328.62, or less than 2 per cent, of the whole. 

These purchases and takings include lands taken in fee, with the 
buildings thereon, and water and other rights connected therewith, 
and lands in which easements and other rights are taken ; but they 
do not include settlements for diversion of water, depreciation and 
other damages connected with lands not acquired, and in which no 
fee or easement has been taken. 



24 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Summary of Land Settlements for Water Works to December 31, 1902. 



LOCATION. 



For the Year 1902. 



Area in 
Acres. 



Wachusett Reservoir.* 
Clinton, . 
Boylston, . 
West Boylston, 
Sterling, . 
Lancaster, . 
Holden, 

Total, 

Wachusett Aqueduct. 
Berlin, 
Boylston, . 
Northborough, 
Southborough, 
Marlborough, 
Clinton, 



Total, .... 

Sudbury Reservoir. \ 
Southborough, . 
Marlborough, . 

Total 

Improving Sudbury Water- 
shed. 
North borough, 
Southborough, 
Westborough, 
Ashland, . 
Marlborough, 

Total 

Clinton Sewerage System. 

Clinton 

Lancaster, .... 

Total 

Weston Aqueduct. 

Weston 

Framingham, . 

Way land, .... 

Total 

Distribution System. 

Boston 

Brookline 

Arlington, .... 
Maiden, .... 

Medford 

Newton 

Quincy, .... 
Stoneham,. 

Total, .... 

Improving Lake Cochituate. 
Natick, .... 

Total 

Aggregates, 



Number 

of Settle. 

menu. 



37.31 |1 
10.42 
130.96 
33.00 

J 



211.69 



13.51 

5.00 

.46 



18.97 



4.34 



4.34 



.67 
26.99 



27.66 



29.23 
7.69 
7.05 



43.97 



.86 



.86 
2.95 



33 



33 



18 



IS 



Payments. 



$139,292 12 



$139,292 12 



$3,275 00 



$3,275 00 



$1,250 00 



$1;250 00 



$10,042 90 



5 $10,042 90 



$21,699 22 



$21,699 22 



$4,427 00 



$4,427 00 
$1,600 00 



2.95 I 1 i $1,600 00 

310.44 65 :$181,586 24 



From Beginning of Work. 



Area in 
Acres. 



Number 

of Settle. 

ments. 



1,221.63 
3,572.35 
1,607.92 

694.91 
69.97 

167.00 



7,333.78 



46.51 
.38 
96.07 
82.31 
51.08 
13.51 



289.86 



1,995.58 

750.98 



2,746.56 



131.35 
2.66 

202.48 
.63 
.74 



368 



368 



64 



64 



150 



150 



34 



337.86 



5.32 
108.72 



114.04 



251.30 

70.04 

8.65 



329.99 



.70 

.05 
1.80 

.16 
2.39 

.06 

5.23 

20.85 



34 



35 



35 



41 



41 



> 27 



31.24 



2.95 



2.95 
11,186.28 



27 

1 

1 

720 



Payments. 



$2,674,632 30 



$2,674,632 30 



$72,487 40 



$72,487 40 
$658,318 75 



$658,318 75 



$12,949 10 



$12,949 10 
$30,544 40 



$30,544 40 
$79,759 46 



$79,759 46 



$107,410 88 



$107,410 88 
$1,600 00 



$1,600 00 
$3,637,702 29 



* Including payments on account of St. John's Catholic Cemetery, 
f Including settlements made by city of Boston. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 25 

(10) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Business. 
Additional claims for injury to business, caused by the carrying 
out of the Metropolitan Water Act in the towns of West Boylston 
and Boylston and portions of the towns of Sterling and Clinton, have 
been filed during the year ending December 31, 1902, to the number 
of 6. Settlements of such claims have been effected during the year 
in 30 cases, under which the sum of $36,250 has been paid ; 2 claims 
have been reconsidered, and settlements thereon effected. Of these 
claims, 6 have been settled in court. The number of claims of this 
class settled since the beginning of the water works is 237, and the 
total sum paid on account of such claims is $88,517. 

(11) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Employment. 
During the year ending December 31, 1902, 16 claims for dam- 
ages for loss of employment by residents of West Boylston have 
been filed. Settlements have been made in 17 cases, the amount 
paid being $3,387.75. During the year, 7 claims have been dis- 
allowed ; and votes previously passed disallowing 2 claims were 
afterwards reconsidered, and settlements made thereunder. The 
whole number of settlements effected is 469. The total amount 
paid on account of these claims is $85,559.16. 

(12) Claims and Settlements for Depreciation of Real 

Estate. 

Settlements in 83 cases of injury to real estate in the towns of 
Sterling and West Boylston have been made during the year ending 
December 31, 1902, and the sum of $104,259.40 has been paid. 
Of these claims, 29 have been settled in the courts. The total 
number of claims of this class settled to December 31, 1902, has 
been 166, and the total amount paid thereon has been $143,779.40. 

In all the remaining cases in West Boylston and Sterling, in 
which application has been made for damages by owners of such 
real estate, offers of settlement have been made by the Board. 

In the Act providing for the payment of damages for depreciation 
in the value of real estate were included that part of the town of 
Boylston that is situated on the northerly side of the proposed res- 
ervoir, and that part of the town of Clinton on either side of River 



26 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and Grove streets for a certain distance below the dam. The estates 
affected in Boy 1st on have all become the property of the Common- 
wealth ; and suits have been brought for the recovery of damages by 
the owners of the estates in that part of the town of Clinton named 
in the Act. 

III. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

(1) Operation of Works. 

The cities and towns supplied with water during the entire year 
were Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Quincy, 
Somerville, Arlington, Belmont, Nahant, Revere, Stoneham, Swamp- 
scott, Watertown and Winthrop. The town of Milton was supplied 
with water after February 28, 1902, through the Milton Water Com- 
pany, by an arrangement made with that company. A small portion 
of the town of Saugus was supplied with water in accordance with 
authority given by the Legislature of the year 1902, through the 
Revere Water Company. The total population of the cities and 
towns thus supplied with water in the year 1902 was, as estimated, 
874,200. 

Water to the extent of 4,320,000 gallons was supplied to the 
town of Lexington, on account of an exigency which arose in the 
water supply of that town. The city of Newton and the town of 
Hyde Park were not supplied with water during the year, inas- 
much as, in the opinion of the Board, these municipalities had not 
reached the safe capacity of their present sources of supply in a dry 
year. 

The city of Medford supplied from its local sources 9,830,000 
gallons. The Milton Water Company supplied to the town of Mil- 
ton, previous to February 28, and subsequently, for the high service 
in that town, 20,190,000 gallons. 

All the rest of the water supplied during the year to the cities 
and towns of the Metropolitan Water District, amounting to 39,- 
122,640,000 gallons, was furnished by the Metropolitan Water 
Works. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



27 



(2) Storage Reservoirs. 

The total nominal capacities of all the storage reservoirs 
15,858,500,000 gallons, as follows : — 



is 



Lake Cochituate, including Dudley Pond, 
Sudbury Reservoir, 
Framingham Reservoir No. 1, 
Framingham Reservoir No. 2, 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 
Ashland Reservoir, 
Hopkinton Reservoir, 
Whitehall Reservoir, 
Farm Pond, . 

Total, . 



Gallons. 

2,242,400,000 

7,253,500,000 

287,500,000 

529,900,000 

1,183,500,000 

1,416,400,000 

1,520,900,000 

1,256,900,000 

167,500,000 

15,858,500,000 



As a matter of fact, however, the amount of water in storage in 
these reservoirs was, at the maximum period during the year, 
16,129,500,000 gallons. 

The Wachusett Reservoir when completed will alone have a 
capacity of upwards of 63,000,000,000 gallons. 

The reservoirs at the beginning of the year were as nearly full 
as it is desirable to keep them during the winter months. The early 
rains caused them to be entirely filled in May, and they so remained 
until June. There was a steady decrease in the amount in storage 
until the end of September, when the reservoirs began again to fill ; 
and at the end of the year the amount of water in storage in these 
reservoirs was 11,716,100,000 gallons. They were for the season 
in a generally satisfactory condition. 

The various sources of supply furnished the District an average 
of 107,268,000 gallons per day. An average of 66,127,000 gallons 
per day was conveyed from the South Branch of the Nashua River, 
through the Wachusett Aqueduct, into the Sudbury Reservoir ; and 
the various reservoirs of the Sudbury system, with this addition, 
supplied through the Sudbury Aqueduct to the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict an average of 95,645,000 gallons per day. An average of 
12,165,000 gallons per day was drawn from Lake Cochituate and 
supplied to the District through the Cochituate Aqueduct. 

Water is drawn from the less satisfactory sources only when 
required by the larger consumption of water in the District. 



28 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



(3) Distributing Reservoirs. 
The distributing reservoirs, which are maintained by the Board 
not only for the purpose of distributing the water supply, but also 
for giving a greater protection to the District, by reason of the large 
amount of water stored within the District, in case of accident to 
the aqueducts, have a total capacity of 2,181,232,000 gallons, as 
follows : — 

Gallons. 

Spot Pond, 1,791,700,000 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 300,000,000 

Fells Reservoir, 41,400,000 

Mystic Reservoir, 26,200,000 

Waban Hill Reservoir in Newton 13,500,000 

Forbes Hill Reservoir in Quincy, 5,100,000 

Forbes Hill Standpipe, . 330,000 

Arlington Standpipe, 550,000 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 2,450,000 

Total, 2,181,230,000 

The Bear Hill Reservoir has been added, during the year. 

The considerable grounds around the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 
which belong to the Commonwealth and are under the custody of 
the Board, constitute, in fact, a part of the park system of the city 
of Boston, and are much resorted to during the summer, especially 
on Sundays and holidays. Considerable expense is therefore re- 
quired to keep these grounds in good order, and a policing force is 
required for their care and protection at times when visited in 
large numbers by the public. 

The Forbes Hill tower is also open to the public, for whom it has 
proved most attractive for sight-seeing, and the grounds surrounding 
the reservoir are also resorted to as a park. 

Spot Pond, as well as the smaller Fells and Bear Hill reser- 
voirs, constitutes a portion of the Middlesex Fells, and in reality 
adds an important attraction to this region. The proper care 
of these grounds also adds considerable expense to the cost of 
maintenance. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 29 

(4) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct has been in use 309 days during the 
year. During the remainder of the time the water has been shut off 
for cleaning the aqueduct, and also at periods during the winter and 
spring freshets on account of the turbidity of the river, which made 
the water unsatisfactory as a part of the water supply. The aque- 
duct has continued in excellent condition. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in constant service during the year 
except during the days when it was shut off for cleaning. Although 
in the preceding year it was running nearly full, an excess of more 
than 5,317,000 gallons has been carried daily during the last year. 
The aqueduct has continued in good condition, notwithstanding such 
use ; but it has been deemed necessary to guard it carefully against 
any menace or interference, inasmuch as the constant running of the 
aqueduct at substantially its full capacity was absolutely necessary 
for the demands of the District. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct has been used for 259 days, and a some- 
what less amount of water has been carried than in the preceding 
year. The improvements in progress in the Pegan Brook Meadow 
diminished to a certain extent the available supply from Lake 
Cochituate. 

(5) Pumping Stations. 

The two pumping stations at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir have 
pumped all of the water which has been supplied to the Metropolitan 
District during the last year, with the exception of the very small 
quantity supplied by the city of Medford and the Milton Water Com- 
pany, and from the watershed of Spot Pond. At the high-service 
station the water is pumped for the high-service district of Boston, 
the city of Quincy, the towns of Watertown and Belmont and the 
greater part of the town of Milton. Water is pumped at the low- 
service station not only for the low-service districts, but to Spot 
Pond, from which are supplied, by pumping, the northern high- 
service district, and also the Fells and the Bear Hill reservoirs. 

The water is again pumped at the Arlington pumping station for 
the extra high service in that town, and at the West Roxbury pump- 
ing station for the Roxbury extra high service and for a portion of 
the town of Milton. 



30 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The various pumping stations, with their respective capacities 
for pumping and the quantities of water pumped by them, are as 
follows : — 



NAME. 



Total Capacity of 

Pumps (Gallons 

per Day). 



Average Number 

of Gallons 
pumped per Day. 



Chestnut Hill, high service, 
Chestnut Hill, low service, 
Spot Pond, 
Arlington, 
West Roxbury, 



66,000,000 
105,000,000 

30,000,000 
1,500,000 
2,000,000 



29,852,000 

76,553,000 

7,997,000 

315,000 

352,000 



The daily pumping capacity of all the stations is 204,500,000 
gallons, and the average number of gallons pumped per day during 
the year was 115,069,000. The total number of gallons pumped 
during the year was 42,000,400,000. 

The necessity of supplying new boilers at the Chestnut Hill high- 
service station, and the great increase in the cost of fuel, which is 
nearly one-half of the total expense of pumping, added considerably 
to what otherwise would have been the cost. Notwithstanding these 
additional expenses, the cost of pumping per million gallons during 
the year was but $2.50, — a reduction of 2 cents from the cost per 
million gallons in the preceding year. The cost of pumping in the 
year 1897 was $9.64 per million gallons. The results obtained in 
the larger stations show the great saving which has been obtained 
by the concentration of pumping stations, and by the use of pump- 
ing engines having a large capacity. 



(6) Pipe Lines and Pipe Yards. 

The Glenwood pipe yard for the northern district, and the Chest- 
nut Hill pipe yard for the southern district, are maintained with 
equipments for the care and repair of the pipe lines. A con- 
siderable emergency and repair force is kept at both the yards, 
ready to make any immediate necessary repairs which may be re- 
quired. These forces have charge of the 82.9 miles of pipe lines 
which are now owned and operated by the Board ; they are also able 
to make various small additions, and to make the ordinary changes 
which are required from time to time. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 31 

During the past year the maintenance force has taken up and 
relaid a considerable 'length of pipe required on account of the 
abolition of grade crossings on Winthrop Avenue in Revere on the 
Boston & Maine Railroad. Pipes were relaid at the Middlesex Ave- 
nue crossing of the Mystic River between Somerville (and Med- 
ford, on account of the action of the Metropolitan Park Commission 
in building a new bridge crossing the river. Considerable work has 
also been required on account of the construction of the Metropol- 
itan sewer in Adams Street in Milton and Quincy, in close proximity 
to the 24-inch water main supplying the city of Quincy. 

(7) Clinton Sewerage and Filtration Works. 

In the operation of the Clinton Sewerage Works, the amount of 
sewage pumped and deposited upon the filter-beds has decreased 
from 838,000 gallons per day, the amount in the preceding year, to 
786,000 gallons per day. This decrease of about 50,000 gallons 
per day was largely brought about by the reconstruction of a piece 
of sewer in the town which was found to be causing a great 
leakage. The cost per million gallons pumped has been $8.34, as 
against $8.24, the cost in the preceding year. The cost of filtration 
per million gallons has been $8.29. The total cost of the operation 
of the pumping station and filter-beds has been $4,735.43. *^ . 

(8) Sanitary Inspection and Regulations. 

Beside the three medical inspectors who have been under the 
supervision of the engineers having charge of the works of construc- 
tion in the Wachusett Reservoir and along the Weston Aqueduct, 
the Sudbury, Cochituate and Wachusett watersheds have been under 
the sanitary inspection of William W. Locke, C.E., sanitary inspec- 
tor, and two assistants. 

The inspectors have kept a constant oversight of the watersheds. 
There have been but few cases of contagious diseases among the 
residents of the watersheds, and those which have occurred have 
been cared for by the local authorities when called to their notice by 
the inspectors of the Board. 

Accurate statistics have been obtained relative to the condition of 
the 118 square miles constituting the Wachusett watershed. The 
permanent population of this watershed numbers 5,764, — a popula- 



32 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

tion of 49 per square mile. There is in addition a summer popula- 
tion of 2,384. The horses, cattle, sheep and swine number 6,781, 
and the poultry 38,062. The total number of premises is 1,746, of 
which 1,298 are occupied permanently, 258 are occupied in the 
summer, and 127 are vacant or deserted. These statistics do not 
include persons employed in connection with the construction of the 
Wachusett Dam and Reservoir. 

In the Wachusett watershed 1,495 premises have been specially 
inspected, and all but 176 were left in a satisfactory condition at the 
end of the year. 

In the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 918 premises were 
specially inspected, of which all but 154 were left in a satisfactory 
condition at the end of the year. In these watersheds 136 cases 
were remedied by sewer connections, 7 were otherwise remedied, 
and 17 were partially remedied, the cesspools in 130 of the cases 
being entirely abandoned. 

In general the local boards of health have zealously co-operated 
with the inspectors. 

In one case of mill pollution the proprietor has refused either to 
remedy the pollution or to allow the Board to do so, and legal pro- 
ceedings have been begun to abate the trouble. 

Some attempts have been made by the authorities of the city of 
Marlborough to improve the condition of Marlborough Brook, which 
empties into the head of the Sudbury Reservoir, and to prevent the 
overflow of the sewage, in times of considerable rains, from the 
sewers into the brook. The attempts made have been entirely inad- 
equate, and the Board has been compelled to request the Attorney- 
General to institute proceedings for the prevention of this serious 
pollution of the water supply. 

No additional ditches for the drainage of swamps have been built 
during the year, and no material repairs for those previously built 
have been required. A considerable force has, however, been re- 
quired for keeping in good condition the 15.55 miles of drainage 
ditches tributary to the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct. 
The improvement made in the color of the water has been main- 
tained. 

On August 28 the Board adopted the following special regulation 
under Rule 14 of the rules of the State Board of Health : — 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 33 

Permission is giveD, until further order, to fish in the waters of the Quin- 
epoxet and Stillwater rivers, and ponds tributary thereto, subject to the 
following limitations and conditions : — 

a. No fish, food or other matter tending to pollute the water shall be 
thrown into the water or left upon the shores. 

b. No tin cans or bait boxes shall be thrown into the water or left upon 
the shores. 

c. No person shall build any fire upon the shores or other land belonging 
to the Commonwealth. 

d. In case fishing is carried on through the ice, no person shall throw or 
leave upon the ice any fish, bait, food or other matter tending to pollute 
the water. 

IV. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loan, Receipts and Assessments. 

The appropriations for the construction and acquisition of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Works, the receipts which are added to these ap- 
propriations, the expenditures for the construction and acquisition 
of works, and the balance available on January 1, 1903, have been 
as follows : — 

Appropriation under chapter 488 of the Acts of 1895, . . . $27,000,000 00 
Appropriation under chapter 453 of the Acts of 1901, . . . 13,000,000 00 



$40,000,000 00 
Proceeds from the sales of property applicable to the construction 
and acquisition of works (of which $27,084.18 is for the year 
1902) 58,197 76 



$40,058,197 76 
Amount approved by the Metropolitan Water Board and the Met- 
ropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for payments to Decem- 
ber 31, 1902 (of which $ 3,657,389. 30 is for the year 1902), . 33,089,721 33 



Balance January 1, 1903, $ 6,968,476 43 

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under the authority given 
him to issue from time to time, on the request of the Board, negoti- 
able bonds to an amount not exceeding $40,000,000, to be designated 
the " Metropolitan Water Loan," has sold bonds as follows : — 



34 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



DATE. 


Bonds sold. 


Rate 

(PerCent.). 


Time 
(Years). 


Price. 


Premiums 
(in Amount). 


1895, 


$2,225,000 


Si 


40 


$110 67 


$237,407 50 


1896, 








2,775,000 


Si 


40 


110 67 


296,092 50 


1896, 








2,000,000 


Si 


39 


106 76268 


135,253 60* 


1897, 








6,000,000 


Si 


38* 


107 82 


469,200 00 


1898, 








2,000,000 


Si 


40 


113 176 


263,520 00 


1898, 








2,000,000 


Si 


40 


112 877 


257,540 00 


1899, 








3,000,000 


3 


40 


100 64 


19,200 00 


1900, 








1,000,000 


3 


39 


102 78 


27,800 00 


1901, 








3,000,000 


3 


40 


102 78 


83,400 00 


1901, 








100,000 


3 


40 


100 375 


375 00 


1901, 








150,000 


3 


40 


100 10 


150 00 


1901, 








205,000 


3 


39£ 


100 25 


512 50 


1901, 








50,000 


3 


39* 


100 25 


125 00 


1901, 








50,000 


3 


39£ 


100 50 


250 00 


1901, 








300,000 


3 


39£ 


100 10 


300 00 


1901, 








200,000 


3 


39i 


100 25 


500 00 


1901, 








3,100,000 


Si 


39£ 


106 71 


208,010 00 


1901, 








1,345,000 


3 


39£ 


100 00 


- 


1901, 








1,500,000 


3 


39£ 


100 00 


— 


1902, 








3,000,000 


Si 


40 


109 13 


273,900 00 


1902, 








500,000 


Si 


40 


109 13 


45,650 00 










834,500,000 


$2,319,186 10 



* Including $18,673.60 from readjustment of rate made by the Treasurer in 1897. 

The sinking fund established by the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth has amounted at the end of each year to sums as follows : — 



December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 
December 31, 



1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 



$226,286 05 
699,860 70 
954,469 00 
1,416,374 29 
1,349,332 97 
1,573,619 72 
1,662,426 95 
2,256,803 81 



Allowances for water furnished from their own sources by cities 
and towns during the year ending May 31, 1902, were made, in ac- 
cordance with the Metropolitan Water Act, as follows : — 



Medford, . 
Stoneham, 



$117 96 
1,366 80 



After deducting these allowances, the net assessments for the year 
1902, made by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth, for the payment 
of the interest on the bonds issued by the Commonwealth, the sink- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



ing fund requirements and the expenses of operation and mainte- 
nance of the water works, were as follows : — 



Arlington, 






$9,272 28 


Newton, . 


$7,498 70 


Belmont, . 






4,673 09 


Quincy, 


24,379 11 


Boston, 






1,274,105 31 


Revere, 


11,030 42 


Chelsea, . 






32,178 83 


Soraerville, 


62,397 89 


Everett, . 






23,931 73 


Stoneham, 


4,799 38 


Hyde Park, 






2,187 72 


Watertown, 


10,862 53 


Maiden, . 






33,352 35 


Winthrop, . 


6,905 58 


Medford, . 
Melrose, . 






19,891 83 
14,434 93 












$1,544,596 47 


Nahant, 






2,694 79 







The comparatively smaller sums assessed upon the city of Newton 
and the town of Hyde Park were owing to the fact that neither of 
these municipalities had reached the safe capacity of its sources, and 
consequently neither had been furnished with water. 

The proceeds from the operations of the Board, exclusive of the 
proceeds from sales of property, have been, according to the pro- 
visions of the Water Act, applied to the payment of interest and 
sinking fund requirements and the maintenance and operation of 
works, as follows : — 



For the year 1902, 



$17,195 71 



The expenditures for the maintenance and operation of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Works have been as follows : — 

For the year 1902, $294,045 14 

Sums have been received during the year 1902, under the pro- 
visions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished as fol- 
lows : — 

Swampscott, $3,000 00 

Revere Water Company, 160 00 

Framingham Water Company, 312 90 

Milton Water Company, 17,301 27 



,774 17 

At the close of the year, the Treasurer, in accordance with the 
requirements of the Act, has distributed to the cities and towns of 
the District, in proportion to the annual assessments theretofore 
contributed by them, this amount, as follows : — 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Hyde Park 

Maiden, 

Med ford, 

Melrose, 

Nahant, 



|41 12 


Newton, . 


50 16 


Quincy, . 


17,255 50 


Revere, 


549 94 


Somerville, 


261 14 


Stoneham, 


34 29 


Watertown, 


521 93 


Winthrop, . 


260 97 




232 46 




9 82 





$103 36 

358 78 

121 13 

907 53 

39 77 

141 15 

66 16 

,955 21* 



(2) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



CONSTRUCTION AND ACQUISITION 
OF WORKS. 



For the Tear ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the 
construction and acquisition of the works, 
Wachusett Dam and Reservoir : — 

Wachusett Dam, 

North Dike, 

South Dike, 

Removal of soil, 

Relocation of railroads, 

Roads and bridges, . 

Real estate, 

Damages, real estate not 
loss of wages, 

Other expenses, 



taken, business and 



Improving Wachusett watershed, . 
Wachusett Aqueduct, 
Sudbury Reservoir, .... 
Protection of Sudbury supply, . 
Improving 8udbury watershed, 
Protection of Cochituate supply, 
Improving Cochituate watershed, . 
Improving Lake Cochituate, 
Pipe lines, Dam No. 3 to Dam No. 1, 
Pipe line, Rosemary siphon, 
Weston Aqueduct : — 

Aqueduct, 

Reservoir, 

Supply pipe lines, .... 

Real estate, taxes and other expenses, 

Amounts carried foncard, 



$437,816 41 

94,701 42 

221 25 

493,524 56 

200,084 84 

26,381 25 

169,985 04 

143,897 15 
1,606 16 



$1,093,420 31 
66,092 27 
377,746 06 
25,688 12 



$24,020 55 



1,568,218 08 

1,353 29 

8,390 60 

331 43 

29 51 

1,998 24 

8,783 04 
70,090 35 



1,562,946 76 
$3,246,161 85 



$897,910 17 

609,748 12 

5,172 94 

1,602,528 64 

214,914 23 

311,358 68 

2,945,516 26 

317,855 56 
4,199 19 



$1,429,941 44 

81,107 55 

384,514 03 

89,987 30 



$198,693 20 



6,909,203 79 

16,156 65 

1,787,911 37 

2,922,445 21 

119,692 37 

90,813 20 

9,000 00 

8,783 04 

96,250 73 

48,471 48 

23,142 98 



1,985,550 32 
$14,216,114 34 



* Including $181.04 remaining undistributed last year. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



37 



CONSTRUCTION AND ACQUISITION 
OF WORKS. 


For the Tear ending 
December 31, 1902. 


From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 


Amounts brought forward, 


• 


$3,246,161 85 


$14,216,114 34 


Distribution system : — 










Low service : — 










Pipe lines and Connections, 


$264,331 78 




$1,731,778 03 




Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 


260 51 




459,250 97 




Reservoir, Spot Pond, 


2,542 84 




578,063 03 




Gate-house and connections, Chestnut 










Hill Reservoir, 


98 33 




65,480 88 




Real estate and other expenses, . 


5,086 88 




84,211 61 




Northern high service : — 










Pipe lines and connections, . . 


525 89 




439,516 77 




Spot Pond pumping station, 


46 81 




290,329 35 




Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, 


17 08 




141,387 94 




Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, . 


11,463 83 




34,793 12 




Real estate and other expenses, . 


464 20 




14,838 05 




Southern high service : — 










Pipe lines and connections, 


744 16 




503,326 94 




Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 


361 74 




242,121 35 




Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, . 


21,303 11 




89,978 48 




Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, 


30 00 




61,592 11 




Real estate and other expenses, . 


3 52 




10,226 36 




Northern extra high service 


702 62 




13,558 74 




Southern extra high service, .... 


22,036 92 




22,417 22 




Meters and connections 


30,657 71 




30,657 71 




Improving Spot Pond Brook, 


2,606 18 




2,606 18 




Glenwood pipe yard, 


- 




33,100 59 




Chestnut Hill pipe yard, .... 


2 28 


363,286 39 


11,066 26 


4,860,301 69 


Diversion of water, south branch of Nashua 










25,378 76 




1,112,466 65 


Acquisition of existing water works : — 










Reimbursement city of Boston, partially 










constructed Sudbury Reservoir, 


- 




$1,157,921 59 




To Boston, for works taken Jan. 1, 1898, 


- 




12,768,948 80 




To Maiden (on account"), for taking of Spot 












- 




25,749 71 




To Newton, for Waban Hill Reservoir, 


- 




60,000 00 




Transfers of works acquired and other prop- 


- 


$14,012,620 10 




erty to accounts for special works, . 


- 




1,239,497 26 






- 


$12,773,122 84 




Engineering, conveyancing, etc 






24,107 60 


12,797,230 44 


Pipes, valves, etc., sent to store yard, and not 




yet transferred to works, .... 


... . 


22,562 30 




103,608 21 


Total for constructing and acquiring of 










$3,657,389 30 


$33,089,721 33 






* f\f tli A . n « n l ~-~ .^ ~« A ! .-.-. «.^« ■£•..!-*«« *1* A 1.4»_la.*.l« 




*V/> _»W. ^t a> 


i o i ana ot i. f n . 


ni{^*ATl OATIT 



erage system. 



38 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



Administration 

General supervision, .... 
Taxes and other expenses, 
Wachusett Reservoir Department : — 

Sanitary inspection, 

Buildings, 

Reservoir, 



Wachusett Dam and Aqueduct Department 
General superintendence, 
Dam and aqueduct, .... 
Clinton sewerage system : — 

Pumping station, .... 

Sewers, screens and filter-beds, . 
Sanitary inspection, 

Sudbury Department : — 
General superintendence, 
Superintendence, Framingham office, 
Sudbury Reservoir, . - . 
Ashland Reservoir, .... 
Hopkinton Reservoir, 
Whitehall Reservoir, 
Framingham Reservoirs, 1, 2 and 3, 
Lake Cochituate, .... 
Marlborough Brook filters, . 
Pegan filters, ..... 
Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 
Sanitary inspection, 
Sudbury and Cochituate Aqueducts, 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 
Biological laboratory, 

Distribution Department : — 

Superintendence, . . . . 
Arlington pumping station, pumping service, 
Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, 

pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, 

pumping service 

8pot Pond pumping station, pumping ser 

vice, 

West Roxbury pumping station, pumping 

service 

Temporary pumping stations, 

Arlington standpipe 

Fells Reservoir, 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station 

Mystic Reservoir, • 

Bear Hill Reservoir, .... 
Forbes Hill Reservoir, .... 

'Amounts carried forward, 



$917 84 

16 95 

293 86 



$852 16 
7,513 46 

2,593 62 

2,590 99 

363 35 



$4,761 32 

5,602 96 

6,631 41 

2,254 04 

1,762 77 

245 31 

4,827 50 

2,805 70 

3,909 14 

5,983 42 

384 10 

2,354 31 

20,189 82 

12,831 79 

2,892 13 



$8,997 79 
4.694 57 

42,103 02 

35,408 34 

12,172 67 

5,855 74 

25 00 

947 21 

3,076 52 

1,305 92 

315 59 

1,762 30 



$6,272 03 

3,040 42 

31,479 38 



1,228 65 



13,913 58 



r7,435 72 



&957 28 
586 94 
625 03 



$7,713 59 
35,590 74 

7,789 17 
7,386 85 
1,632 69 



$29,976 05 
28,778 35 
36,093 96 

8,856 54 
10,949 44 

1,658 78 

24.552 88 

14.553 54 
10,544 37 
17,323 87 

2,115 82 
12,027 76 
90,441 72 
56,148 66 
16,759 53 



$36,349 70 
11,432 31 

217,877 33 

94,477 51 

38,876 80 

24,952 87 

52,979 06 

418 93 

3,854 46 

17,386 63 

10,392 12 

315 59 

1,920 34 



$38,082 84 
13,527 99 
78,959 52 



2,169 25 



60,113 04 



360,781 27 



$116,664 67 $133,369 78 



$511,233 65 $553,633 91 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 



39 



MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Distribution Department — Con. 

Spot Pond 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Pipe lines : — 

Low service, 

Northern high service, . 

Southern high service, 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill, . 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

Stables 

Waste prevention 

Total for maintaining and operating works, 



$116,664 67 $133,369 78 

4,507 58 
924 28 
506 56, 

10,447 88 
5,557 97 
2,524 12 
3,153 48 
1,656 24 
5,654 01 
6,270 10 
2,808 47 



160,675 36 



$294,045 14 



$511,233 65 $553,633 91 

13,555 17 

924 28 

3,957 58 

, 92,937 59 
23,101 09 
13,386 27 

7,902 49 

3,139 00 
16,620 83 
22,043 54 

2,898 61 



711,700 10 



$1,265,334 01 



(3) Detailed Financial Statement. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Water Act, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, re- 
ceipts, assets and liabilities for the year 1902. 



(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on account 
of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning Jan- 
uary 1, 1902, and ending December 31, 1902, is $3,657,389.30, and 
the total amount from the time of the organization of the Board, July 
19, 1895, to December 31, 1902, is $33,089,721.33. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year have 
been $294,045.14, and from the beginning of the work $1,265,334.01. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and other expenses of admin- 
istration, have been apportioned to the construction of the works and 
to the maintenance and operation of the same, and appear under 
each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
o;eneral character : — 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF 
EXPENDITURES. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



I. Construction of Works, and Acqui- 
sition bt Purchase or Taking. 

Administration . 
Commissioners, . 
Secretary and auditor, 
Clerks and stenographers, 
Legal services, 
Travelling, . 
Stationery and printing, 
Postage, express and telegrams, 
Furniture and fixtures, 
Alterations and repairs of buildings, 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and 

of building, . 
Rent and taxes, main office, 
Miscellaneous expenses, 



Engineering. 
Chief engineer and department engineers 
Principal assistant engineers, 
Engineering assistants, 
Consulting engineers, . 
Inspectors, .... 

Architects 

Railroad and street car travel, 

Wagon hire, 

Stationery and printing, . 

Postage, express and telegrams, 

Engineering and drafting instruments 

tools, ...... 

Engineering and drafting supplies, . 
Books, maps and photographic supplies, 
Furniture and fixtures, 
Alterations and repairs of building, — 

office, .... 
Alterations and repairs of building, — 

offices, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and 

of building, — main office, 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and 

of building, — sub-offices, . 
Rent and taxes, — main office, . 
Rent of sub-offices and other buildings, 
Field offices and sheds, 
Clinton office building, 
Unclassified supplies, .... 
Miscellaneous expenses, 



and 



sub 



Amounts carried fomoard, 



$8,166 66 
4,170 82 
7,571 31 

273 06 
854 23 
373 96 
180 94 
51 05 

1,029 62 

930 40 

418 50 
$24,020 55 



$23,821 59 

15,081 53 

112,837 95 

48,652 64 

390 00 

2,972 12 

6,737 01 

2,860 28 

826 22 

646 61 

2,012 70 

436 49 

563 90 

390 14 

135 11 

2,755 61 

1,777 63 

2,831 20 

554 00 

168 84 

1,370 22 
357 36 



228,179 15 



$86,976 93 
37,491 72 
38,027 41 
2,359 00 
2,272 21 
6,323 89 
2,043 11 
3,974 69 
5,723 08 

7,596 41 
2,312 40 
3,592 35 



$156,068 79 

110,606 41 

781,812 06 

23,187 07 

211,413 46 

26,260 47 

23,942 66 

32,508 22 

21,737 27 

6,360 17 

18,875 13 

21,604 86 

5,271 33 

14,804 48 

13,115 70 

2,736 75 

13,882 29 

12,594 82 

6,705 55 

3,707 74 

1,236 54 

9,866 87 

7,126 94 

7,661 77 



$198,693 20 



$252,199 70 



1,533,087 35 
$1,731,780 55 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF 
EXPENDITURES. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



anal 



hardware 



Amounta brought forward, 

Construction. 
Preliminary work (borings, test pits and other 

investigations) : — 
Advertising, 

Labor 

Professional services, medical services 

yses, etc., .... 

Travelling 

Rent 

Water rates, .... 
Freight and express, 
Jobbing and repairing, . 
Tools, machinery, appliances and 

supplies 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 
Iron pipe and valves, 
Blasting supplies, . 
Paint and coating, . 
Fuel, oil and waste, . 
Lumber and field buildings, . 
Drain pipe, .... 
Brick, cement and stone, 
Sand, gravel and filling, . 
Municipal and corporation work, 
Unclassified supplies, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 

Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir: — 

Contracts completed and final payments 
made prior to January 1, 1902, . 

Moulton & O'Maboney, excavating soil and 
refilling at North Dike, Sect. 4, . 

Nawn & Brock, excavating soil, Sect. 6, and 
building easterly portion of North Dike, . 

Busch Bros., excavating soil, Sect. 6, and 
building road, West Boylston and Boyl- 
ston, — $600 due, deducted from estimate 
September 5, 1900 

Long & Little, excavating soil, Sect. 7, and 
building part of North Dike, 

Newell & Snowling Construction Co., exca- 
vating soil from Sect. 8, and completing 
westerly portion of North Dike, 

Meskill Bros. & Leahy, excavating soil and 
building part of Worcester Street, West 
Boylston, 

Crary Construction Co., building Sect. 1 of 
the Relocation of Central Massachusetts 
Railroad, 



Amounts carried forward, 



$495 99 
21,853 17 

23 50 
4 20 

17 49 

24 47 

82 87 

283 56 

32 28 

156 28 

3 00 
994 06 
191 28 

30 

4 90 

176 22 
289 68 
333 75 



$520 00 
291,562 26 



68,960 79 



121,502 83 



9,263 95 



24,412 37 



$252,199 70 



$1,731,780 55 



24,967 00 



$5,861 39 


118,751 49 


711 83 


1,648 98 


37 00 


2,094 79 


484 00 


559 07 


15,880 30 


207 85 


3,386 31 


41 29 


142 98 


1,977 86 


6,670 02 


41 10 


242 71 


269 45 


220 29 


1,499 57 


583 44 
161,311 22 


$362,154 83 


157,650 37 


969,416 62 



34,560 63 
220,003 15 

153,946 55 

9,263 95 

24,412 37 



$516,222 20 $277,166 70 $1,931,408 47 $1,893,091 77 



42 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF 
EXPENDITURES. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December ' 

31, 1902. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Conatruction — Con. 
Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir— Con. 
McArthur Bros. Co., building Sect. 2 of the 
Relocation of Central Massachusetts Rail- 
road 

Nawn & Brock, building Sect. 3 of the Relo- 
cation of Central Massachusetts Railroad, 
G. M. Atkins & Co., building Sect. 4 of the 
Relocation of Central Massachusetts Rail- 
road, 

Win. Cramp & Sons, bronze grooves for Wa- 
chusett Dam, 

McArthur Bros., Wachusett Dam, 
Camden Iron Works, special castings, . 
Chapman Valve Manufacturing Co., valves, . 
*Coffin Valve Manufacturing Co., valves and 

iron work 

*Davis & Farnum Manufacturing Co., special 

castings, 

*Davis & Farnum Manufacturing Co., special 

castings, 

*G. W. & F. Smith Iron Co., steel work for 

chambers 

Taunton Locomotive Manufacturing Co., 

special castings, 

♦United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry 
Co., cast iron pipe and special castings, . 

Contracts, Wachusett Aqueduct : — 
Contracts completed and final payments 
made prior to January 1, 1902, . 
Contracts, Sudbury Reservoir: — 
Contracts completed and final payments 
made prior to January 1, 1902, . 
Contracts, improving Lake Cochituate : — 
Long & Little, excavation from Snake Brook 

Meadow 

Auguste Saucier, Pegan Brook Meadow, 

Contracts, protection Cochituate Supply: — 

Town of Framingham, low-level sewer, 
Contracts, Rosemary siphon : — 
Contracts completed and final payments 
made prior to January 1, 1902, . 
Contracts, pipeline, DamNo.3toDamNo.l : — 
Contracts completed and final payments 
made prior to January 1, 1902, . 
Contracts, Clinton sewerage system : — 
Contracts completed and final payments 
made prior to January 1, 1902, . 

Amounta carried forward, 



$516,222 20 $277,166 70 



107,807 66 
24,300 86 

31,080 20 

3,660 00 

356,483 48 

7,848 78 

14,512 00 

3,741 00 

2,712 10 

934 95 

3,000 00 

1,203 37 

1,514 80 



$1,931,408 47 $1,893,091 77 



1,075,021 40 



107,807 66 
24,300 86 

31,080 20 

3,660 00 

516,405 12 

7,848 78 

14,512 00 

3,741 00 

2,712 10 

934 95 

3,000 00 

1,203 37 

1,514 80 



$3,959 69 

39,553 89 
43,513 58 



$14,196 49 
39,553 89 



$1,395,701 68 



2,650,129 31 



1,447,208 55 



1,545,028 33 



53,750 38 
9,000 00 

6,916 98 

17,240 22 

66,878 22 
$7,688,243 74 



* Including some iron work for Weston Aqueduct. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 



43 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF 
EXPENDITURES. 



For the Tear ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of "Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Construction — Con. 

Contracts, Weston Aqueduct : — 

T. H. Gill Sect. 1, 

Shanaban, Casparia & Co., . . Sect. 2, 
Shanahan, Casparia & Co., . . Sect. 3, 
Patrick McGovern, .... Sect. 4, 
Bruno, Salomone and Petitti, . . Sect. 5, 

. Shanahan, Casparia & Co., . . Sect. 6, 
E. Kendall & Sona, eteel pipe, Sects. 7 and 9, 
T. Bruno, blow-off, .... Sect. 9, 
Winaton & Co., . . Sects. 8 and 10, 



Sect. 11, 
Sect. 12, 
Sect. 13, 
Sect. 13, 
Sect. 14, 
Sect. 15, 



Winaton & Co., 

Shanahan, Casparia & Co., 

Michael H. Keefe, . 

Columbua Conatruction Co., . 

Nawn & Brock, 

Winaton & Co., 

H. W. Worthington, castings for aiphon 
chambers, ........ 

Nawn 8s Brock, Weston Reservoir, Sect. 1, 

Nawn & Brock, Weston Reservoir, Sect. 2, 

Ward & Cummings, supply pipe lines, Sect. 1, 

Dennis F. O'Connell, supply pipe lines, 
Sect. 2 

Thomas F. Moore, supply pipe lines, Sect. 4, 

Builders Iron Foundry, Venturi meters, 

Camden Iron Works, special castings, . 

L. F. Childs, distributing pipe, 

Taunton Locomotive Mfg. Co., special cast- 
ings and flanged pipe, 

Contracts, Distribution System : — 
Contracts completed and final payments 

made prior to January 1, 1902, . 
Coleman Bros., pipe laying, . . Sect. 12, 
C. E. Trumbull & Co., pipe laying, Sect. 12, 
T. Bruno, pipe laying, . . . Sect. 30, 
Beck with & Quackenbush, reservoir and 

foundation for etandpipe, Forbes Hill, 
JameaE. McCoy, masonry tower, Forbes Hill, 
McNeil Bros., high-service pumping station, 

$1,500 due, deducted from final estimate 

May 22, 1901, * 

C. H. Eglee, Bear Hill Reservoir, . 

New England Structural Co., steel work for 

valve chambers, 

Daniel Russell Boiler Works Co., steel 

chambers for Venturi meters, . 
Builders Iron Foundry, Venturi meters, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$1,395,701 68 



$18,398 80 
93,265 47 

62.977 04 
17,698 23 
70,574 47 
56,409 72 

102,589 54 

2,191 94 

65,166 30 

87.978 80 
66,813 44 

192,757 74 
26,841 68 
85,394 84 

11,258 00 

8,453 25 

32,399 51 

19,552 98 

59,301 11 

22,992 23 

6,180 00 

2,284 84 

1,043 88 

1,891 58 



$45,987 04 

44,431 59 

7,602 81 

6,832 44 
14,193 90 



8,332 29 
1,056 00 

6,942 81 

9,661 95 



1,114,415 39 



$144,040 83 $2,510,117 07 



$18,398 80 

132,828 69 
86,183 66 
61,161 69 

114,332 51 
76,899 56 

102,589 54 
2,191 94 
74,814 56 
87,978 80 
94,198 15 
11,206 05 

217,569 34 
26,841 68 
88,721 42 

11,258 00 

8,453 25 

32,399 51 

19,552 98 

59,301 11 

22,992 23 

6,180 00 

2,284 84 

1,043 88 

1,891 58 



$3,499,540 96 

45,987 04 

44,431 59 

7,602 81 

37,253 61 
25,967 95 



89,119 85 

24,894 47 

1,056 00 



6,942 81 



9,661 95 



$7,688,243 74- 



1,361,273 IT 



$3,792,459 04 $9,049,517 51 



44 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF 
EXPENDITURES. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



Amount* brought forward, 

Construction —Con. 
Contracts, Distribution 8ystem — Con. 
Osgood & Witherly, frames and covers, 
*G. F. Blake Mfg. Co., special castings, 
Camden Iron Works, special castings, . 
♦United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry 

Co., special castings, 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry 

Co., cast-iron pipe and special castings, 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry 

Co., cast-iron pipe and special castings, . 

♦United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry 

Co., cast-iron pipe and special castings, . 

♦United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry 

Co., cast-iron pipe and special castings, . 

♦Warren Foundry and Machine Co., special 

castings, 

Coffin Valve Mfg. Co., valves, 
♦Coffin Valve Mfg. Co., valves and sluice 

gates, 

*G. F. Blake Mfg. Co., valves, 

Deduct value of pipes, valves, etc., included in 
above list, transferred to maintenance ac- 
count December 31, 1900, and shown on 
page 47, 

Additional work : — 
Labor, .... 



Professional services, medica 

yses, etc., 
Travelling, 

Rent, 

Water rates, 
Freight and express, 
Jobbing and repairing, . 
Tools, machinery, appliances 

supplies, 
Electrical supplies, . 
Castings, ironwork and metals, 
Iron pipe and valves, 
Blasting supplies, . 
Paint and coating, . 
Fuel, oil and waste, 
Lumber and field buildings, 
Drain pipe, 

Brick, cement and stone, 
Sand, gravel and filling, . 
Municipal and corporation work, 
Police service 



services, anal 



and hardware 



Amounts carried forward, 



$144,040 83 $2,510,117 07 

1,136 91 
11,889 80 
11,172 40 

3,752 80 

175,495 00 

10,702 64 , 

1,494 67 

242,236 53 

2,901 30 
2,763 00* 



7,205 00 
11,940 00 



626,730 88 



$53,214 88 

36 00 
161 57 
430 00 

3 28 
895 56 
822 08 

2,329 21 

4 50 
6,852 67 
7,175 03 

279 07 

108 78 

3,778 47 

1,842 62 

2,289 12 

1,778 43 

131 00 

19,277 30 

32,483 60 

$133,893 17 $3,136,847 95 



$3,792,459 04 $9,049,517 51 



1,136 91 


11,889 80 


11,172 40 


3,752 80 


175,495 00 


10,702 64 


1,494 67 


242,236 53 


2,901 30 


2,763 00 


7,205 00 


11,940 00 


$4,275,149 09 



3,139 77 



$506,416 87 

1,486 99 
1,088 22 
3,387 37 
1,322 26 
9,194 30 
7,735 97 

64,881 65 

4.776 00 
49,757 38 
49,981 51 

1,138 48 

3,709 96 

9,448 81 

72,669 72 

6.777 29 
14,563 55 

4,814 37 

84,031 17 

155,942 22 



4,272,009 32 



$1,053,124 09 $13,321,526 83 



* Including some iron work for other departments. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF 
EXPENDITURES. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



Amounts brought forward, 
Construction — Con 
Additional work — Con. 
Sanitary inspection, 
Judgments, . 
Unclassified supplies, . . 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 

Legal and expert: — 
Legal services, .... 
Expert services, 
Court expenses, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 

Real Estate. 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, . 

Conveyancer and assistants, 

Experts, .... 

Appraisers, 

Court expenses, . . 

Counsel expenses, . 

Conveyancing supplies, . 

Conveyancing expenses, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 
Settlements made by Board, 

Judgments 

Taxes and tax equivalents, 
Care and disposal, 

Damages to Real Estate not taken, to Business, 

and on Account of Loss of Wages. 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, 

Expert services 

Court expenses, 

Settlements, 

Judgments, 

Claims on Account of Diversion of Water. 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, 

Expert services 

Court expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 
Settlements, 

Purchase of Existing Water Works. 
Legal and expert : — 

Legal services, 

Expert services, 

Miscellaneous expenses, . . . . 
♦Settlements and judgments, .... 

Total amount of construction expenditures, 



$133,893 17 $3,136,847 95 



1,728 26 

12,047 05 

1,041 40 

371 51 



$50 00 

414 20 
15 70 



$8,513 60 

278 00 

2,328 00 

1,635 68 

98 22 

504 23 

2,673 87 

158,010 66 

23,575 58 

480 24 

13,512 40 



$85 00 

3,386 69 

93,343 75 

50,553 40 



$4,706 58 

7,245 54 

48 72 



149,081 39 



479 90 



211,610 38 



147,368 84 



12,000 84 



$3,657,389 30 



$1,053,124 09 $13,321,526 83 



7,869 87 

32,028 94 

9,018 14 

2,691 53 



1,104,732 57 



$4,668 82 

475 87 

774 51 

49 05 



$4,736 31 

85,487 16 

17,173 58 

17,459 34 

3,930 20 

43 25 

2,989 22 

5,036 19 

3,591 32 

3,049,767 67 

56,328 62 

67,493 15 

51,569 15 



$1,130 67 

85 00 

4,840 55 

267,302 16 

50,553 40 



$3,774 98 

17,937 22 

9,589 33 

1,222 63 

917,350 00 



$1,878 89 

2,650 65 

952 94 

14,012,620 10 



5,968 2b 



3,365,605 16 



323,911 78 



949,874 16 



14,018,102 58 
$33,089,721 33 



* Including transfers from Sudbury Works. 



46 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF 
EXPENDITURES. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



II. Maintenance and Operation of 
Works. 
Administration : — 

Commissioners 

Secretary, auditor and assistants, . 

Postage, printing, stationery and other sup 
plies, 

Travelling, 

Telephone, heating, lighting and care of 
building, 

Alterations and repairs of building, 

Rent and taxes, office building, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 
Supervision and general superintendence : — 

Chief engineer and department engineers, 

Engineering and clerical assistants, 

Postage, printing, stationery and office sup 
plies, 

Telephone, heating, lighting and care of 
offices, 

Travelling and incidental expenses, 

Alterations and repairs of buildings, 

Rent and taxes, main office, . 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 
Pumping service : — 

Labor * . 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, . 

Small supplies and expenses, 

Pumping by municipalities, . 

Rent, West Roxbury pumping station, 
Superintendents and assistant superintendents 
Engineering assistants, 
Laboratory force, 
Sanitary inspectors, . 
Recording and scientific instruments 

plies, 

Labor and teaming, 
Tools, machinery and appliances, 
Lumber and hardware supplies, 
Jobbing aud repairing, 

Travelling 

Horses, vehicles and stable expenses 
Fuel, lighting and telephone, 
Municipal and corporation work, 
Alterations and repairs of buildings, 
Settlements of claims, . . 
Unclassified supplies, . 

Amount 8 carried forward, 



and 



sup 



$2,333 S3 


2,091 81 


650 70 


394 96 


478 42 


104 06 


ISO 00 


58 75 


7,399 66 


7,129 92 



599 41 

1,285 48 
343 74 
217 19 
450 00 
226 29 

45,737 91 

40,473 64 

1,618 22 

8.386 53 
3,198 04 

820 00 

3.387 90 
9,567 75 
2,123 62 
3,056 04 

258 84 
85,728 73 
1,724 68 
4,231 40 
1,719 85 
3,815 84 
3,889 37 
4,010 14 

255 80 
26 48 

5,907 42 



$10,733 33 


19,085 87 


2,462 18 


1,001 88 


2,379 91 


1,554 68 


455 60 


409 39 


34,587 98 


33,661 02 



3,688 90 



$253,861 92 



5,354 53 


2,339 86 


5,477 04 


1,169 59 


1,288 41 


184,409 46 


163,968 14 


6,920 54 


25,176 59 


12,187 35 


45,273 80 


2,660 00 


15,344 66 


37,510 33 


12,439 60 


12,697 16 


2,417 84 


364,431 92 


8,892 25 


12,397 07 


9,389 02 


13,584 14 


17,215 39 


14,086 73 


4,094 59 


429 45 


1,000 00 


21,507 88 


$1,113,664 08 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



47 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF 
EXPENDITURES. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Maintenance, etc. — Con 
Miscellaneous expenses, 
Conveyancer and assistants, 
Taxes and tax equivalents, 
Contracts and agreements, . 
Contracts for pipes, valves, etc 

construction -work since January 1, 1901, 
Contracts for pipes, valves, etc., originally 
charged to construction, transferred to main- 
tenance previous to January 1, 1901 (included 

in list, pages 43, 44), 

Total expenditures for maintenance and 
operation, 



, bought from 



$253,861 92 

1,078 14 

10 99 

31,468 39 

4,970 98 

2,654 72 



$1,113,684 08 

5,405 10 

363 84 

78,592 56 

58,755 92 

5,392 74 



3,139 77 



$294,045 14 



$1,265,334 01 



(b) Heceij)ts. 

The total amount of receipts from rents, sales of property, etc., 
for the year beginning January 1, 1902, and ending December 31, 
1902, is $65,054.06 ; and the total amount from the time of the 
organization of the Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1902, is 
$279,770.62. The general character of these receipts is as follows : — 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF 
RECEIPTS. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



For distribution back to District : — 

District entrance fees 

Supplying water outside of District, 
Water furnished to water companies, . 

To the credit of the loan fund : — 

Real estate and buildings 

Labor, tools and supplies, . 

To the credit of the sinking fund : — 
Forfeiture for contracts awarded but not 

executed 

Rents 

Land products, 

Unclassified receipts 



$3,000 00 
17,774 17 

$1,963 83 
25,120 35 



$10,311 03 

6,812 62 

72 06 



Total receipts, 



$20,774 17 



27,084 18 



17,195 71 



$65,054 06 



$65,005 00 
28,405 64 
35,652 44 



$11,833 83 
46,363 93 



$500 00 

70,124 07 

21,494 66 

391 05 



$129,063 08 



58,197 76, 



92,509 78 



$279,770 62 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



48 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



RECEIPTS FROM DIFFERENT 
WORKS. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Beginning of Work, 

and ending December 

31, 1902. 



Distribution back to District : — 
Admission into Metropolitan Water District 
Nahant, Quincy, Stonebam and Arling- 
ton) 

Supplying water to towns outside of Water 

District (Swampecott and Lexington), 
Water furnished to water companies, . 

Construction and acquisition of works : — 

Administration, 

Wachusett Dam 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct 

Sudbury Reservoir and watershed, 

Distribution system, 

Diversion of water, Clinton sewerage system, 
Purchase of existing water works, 

Maintenance and operation of works : — 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Sudbury system 

Distribution system 

Clinton sewerage system, .... 



Total receipts, 



$3,000 00 
17,774 17 



$4,445 00 

16,763 19 

4,699 75 

97 77 

5 96 

14,834 78 

1,085 00 



$516 08 
998 36 
303 82 
530 18 



$20,774 17 



41,931 45 



2,348 44 



$65,054 06 



$65,005 00 

28,405 64 
35,652 44 



$0 75 

4,897 09 

83,931 55 

5,204 70 

1,218 28 

7,255 16 

31,310 83 

656 91 

6,373 12 



$2,098 19 
5,021 64 
1,520 70 
1,218 62 



$129,063 08 



140,848 39 



9,859 15 



$279,770 62 



(c) Assets, 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies ; engineering and scientific instruments and 
supplies; police supplies ; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc. ; machinery, 
tools and other appliances and supplies ; real estate connected with works 
not completed: completed works, including real estate and buildings con- 
nected therewith. 

(d) Liabilities. 
There are liabilities as follows : — 

Current bills unpaid $42,40000* 

Due on monthly pay rolls, 4,220 00 

846,620 00 



* Miscellaneous current bills of 1902, including those coming in from time to time after January I, 
1903, have since been paid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



49 



Amounts reserved on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Con- 
tracts or until Claims are settled. 



NAME. 


Work. 


Amount. 


McArthur Bros. Co., 


Wachusett Dam, . 


§36,836 20 


Busch Bros., 


Building road, Wachusett 






Reservoir, .... 


600 00 


Nawn & Brock, .... 


Wachusett Reservoir, Sect. 6, 


10,000 00 


Newell &Snowling Construction Co., 


Wachusett Reservoir, Sect. 8, 


27,167 04 


McNeil Bros., 


High-service pumping sta- 






tion, Items 8 and 9, . 


1,500 00 


Augnste Saucier, .... 


Improving Lake Cochituate, 






Pegan Meadow, . 


6,662 45 


T. H. Gill & Co., .... 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 1, 


2,052 73 


Shanahan, Casparis & Co., 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 2, 


2,631 53 


Shanahan, Casparis & Co., 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 3, 


2,108 88 


Bruno, Salomone & Petitti, 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 5, 


5,000 00 


Shanahan, Casparis & Co., 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 6, 


1,805 81 


E. Kendall & Sons, .... 


Weston Aqueduct, Sects. 7 






and 9, 


8,104 04 


Winston & Co., .... 


Weston Aqueduct, Sects. 8 






and 10, ... 


4,884 92 


Winston & Co., .... 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 11, . 


6,949 20 


Shanahan, Casparis & Co., 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 12, . 


1,432 03 


Columbus Construction Co., 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 13, . 


20,000 00 


Nawn & Brock, .... 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 14, . 


4,736 77 


Winston & Co., .... 


Weston Aqueduct, Sect. 15, . 


8,509 66 


Nawn & Brock, .... 


Weston Reservoir, Sect. 1, . 


1,491 75 


Nawn & Brock, .... 


Weston Reservoir, Sect. 2, . 


4,094 03 


Crary Construction Co , . 


Relocation Central Massachu- 






setts Railroad, Sect. 1, 


4,308 06 


McArthur Bros. Co., 


Relocation Central Massachu- 






setts Railroad, Sect. 2, 


8,330 76 


G. M. Atkins & Co 


Relocation Central Massachu- 






setts Railroad, Sect. 4, 


5,484 74 


Ward & Cummings, .... 


Supply pipe lines, Sect. 1, 


3,450 53 


Dennis F. O'Connell, 


Supply pipe lines, Sect. 2, 


9,723 73 


Thomas F. Moore, .... 


Supply pipe lines, Sect. 4, 


1,998 63 


G. F. Blake Mfg. Co 


Special castings, . 


2,098 20 


Camden Iron Works, 


Special castings, . 


1,971 60 


United States Cast Iron Pipe and 






Foundry Co., 


Cast iron pipe and special 






castings, .... 


30,969 71 


Coleman Bros., 


Pipe laying, Medf ord, Sect. 12, 


7,762 42 




§232,665 42 



Amounts have been agreed upon in the following cases, but the 
deeds have not passed : — 

Godfrey Fuller, $20 ; Mary E. Dolan et al., $610 ; Nathan Eugene 
Upham, $3,680.25; George A. Bacon, $75; George L. Butler et 



50 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

als., $647 ; Sarah E. Kirby, $1,950; William O. Johnson, $7,250; 
James M. Wilson, $2,250. 

On the claims - of the following it is impossible to state the amounts 
due for land damages and water rights, as suits are now pending in 
the courts for the determination of the same : — 

Patrick T. Moran, estate of William H. Buck, estate of Henrietta 
M. Johnson, Charles L. Johnson, Charles B. Sawin, Bigelow Carpet 
Company, Charles E. Nichols, J. M. Sears, city of Maiden balance, 
city of Medford, city of Melrose, Edward A. Cowee, heirs of Hanson 
Chase, Boston & Maine Railroad, American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, Delina Mallett, John F. O'Brien, Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad Compan}^, Emory A. Bacon, Frances A. Wilder et ah, 
Frances H. Chase, administratrix, Nashua River Paper Company, 
George L. Redding, James Dorr, Charles U. Cotting et als., Fram- 
ingham Water Company, Charles W. Felt, Johanna T. Dunn, 
Katherine Cameron, Robert F. Perkins, Francis Shaw, Abner S. 
Yose, Elizabeth F. Bowditch et als. , Julius Heinig, Theresa Graichen, 
Andrew Leinhardt, James B. Marsh, Catherine McGuinness, town 
of West Boylston. 

V. SEWERAGE WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Works embrace the North Metro- 
politan System and the South Metropolitan System. 

(1) North Metropolitan System. 

The North Metropolitan System provides for the cities and towns of 
Arlington, Belmont, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, 
Melrose, Somerville, Stoneham, Wakefield, Winchester, Winthrop, 
Woburn, a part of the town of Lexington, and the parts of the city 
of Boston known as East Boston and Charlestown, all situated in 
the Charles River and Mystic River valleys, but wholly north of the 
Charles River. 

The North Metropolitan District has an area of 84.64 square miles, 
and an estimated population of 452,100, of which 342,321 contribute 
sewage to the system. The length of the Metropolitan sewers in 
this system is 55.391 miles. 

No additional Metropolitan sewers have been constructed during 
the year, the system, so far as at present authorized, having been 
substantially completed during the preceding year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 51 

The sum of $56,161.71 was expended during the year 1902. 

The amount of appropriations under the various acts was $5,605,- 
865.73, and the receipts from sales of real estate and from miscel- 
laneous sources amounted to $16,526.73, — a total of $5,622,392.46. 
There had been expended up to the year ending December 31, 1902, 
$5,621,869.52. 

The attention of the Legislature has been called by a special re- 
port to the necessity for an additional appropriation on account of 
this system. 

(2) South Metropolitan System. 

The South Metropolitan System provides for the cities and towns of 
Brookline, Hyde Park, Milton, Newton and Quincy, a part of the 
town of Dedham, and the Brighton district and portions of the Back 
Bay, Dorchester, Roxbury and West Roxbury districts in the city 
of Boston, all situated on the south side of the Charles River, and 
the city of Waltham and the town of Watertown, situated on the 
north side of that river. This system provides for the sewage of a 
portion of the Charles River valley and of a portion of the Neponset 
River valley. 

The South Metropolitan District embraces an area of 102.55 
square miles, having an estimated population of 291,700, of which 
contribution is made to the sewage by 130,895. 

The system includes the Charles River valley sewer, which has 
been entirely completed ; the Neponset River valley sewer, which 
has been substantially completed during the year 1902 ; and the 
High-level sewer, of which the construction is in active progress. 
The length of the Charles River sewer is 8.15 miles ; of the Nepon- 
set River sewer, 12.57 miles; and of the High-level sewer, as pro- 
jected, 16.83 miles. 

The portion of the Neponset River valley sewer which was com- 
pleted during the year 1902 is situated in West Roxbury and 
Newton, and about 4,915 feet were constructed. 

The chief work of construction on account of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works has been carried on upon the High-level sewer, 
which is to extend from the foot of the northerly side of Parker Hill 
in Roxbury, through portions of Jamaica Plain, Hyde Park, Milton 
and Quincy to Nut Island, whence outfall pipes are to be laid about 
a mile in length in the bed of the harbor. Of the entire length of 
16.83 miles, about 13.21 miles have been completed, or carried to an 



52 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

advanced stage of construction. On 2.83 miles but little work has 
been accomplished, or the work is still to be begun ; only 0.79 of a 
mile yet remains to be contracted for. Of the entire length of the 
sewer, 4.08 miles will be in tunnel. 

The work in general has been carried on satisfactorily during the 
year, and it is expected that the sewer will be substantially completed 
as far as Nut Island in the coming season. Considerable difficulty 
was experienced by the contractors in the construction of a portion 
of the tunnel located in South and Centre streets, West Roxbury. 
This section has a total length of 4,775 feet, and is* in tunnel at a 
depth of about 50 feet below the surface of the ground. As the 
progress made had not been sufficient to insure the completion of 
the section in time for use in connection with the other portions of 
the sewer, the Board terminated the contract early in the year, and 
has since carried on the work by day labor. The tunnel is built 
largely in sand, which in some places is very fine, and the construc- 
tion has been carried on with the use of pneumatic pressure and 
metallic roof-plates. The rate attained will insure the satisfactory 
completion of the section. 

During the past year Nut Island has been levelled by removing 
the upper portion of the island, and, with the material acquired, an 
embankment has been built from the island to the main shore at 
Hough's Neck. This embankment when finished will have a top 
elevation of about 27 feet above low water, and a top width of 25 
feet. 

On Nut Island a screen house will be erected, from which outfall 
pipes about a mile each in length will lead out into the harbor, hav- 
ing outlets about 1,500 feet apart. Work has been carried on upon 
one of the lines during the past season. Sixty-inch cast-iron spigot 
and socket pipes are laid in trenches dredged in the bottom of the 
harbor. The bottom of the pipes will have an average depth of 
about 9 feet below the bottom of the harbor, a maximum of 51 feet 
below mean high water. The trench is dug 2 feet deeper, and piles 
for supporting the pipes are driven in pairs at intervals of 6 feet. 
Satisfactory progress has been made in the laying of the pipes. A 
contract for laying the second line of pipes will be made early in the 
present year. 

A contract was executed in October of last year for the erection 
of the large pumping station required for the High-level sewer at the 





HIGH-LEVEL SEWER — Nut Island and Bar, Before Beginning of Work and 
After Construction of Embankment and Grading of Island. 






No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



53 



corner of Ward and Vancouver streets in Roxbury. The entire 
structure, comprising the engine room, boiler room, coal house and 
screening chamber, will have an area of 15,000 square feet. The 
building will be of hard brick with granite trimmings, while the 
foundations will be made of Portland concrete. A contract has also 
been made for furnishing and erecting two vertical triple-expansion 
pumping engines, having each a daily capacity of 50,000,000 gallons, 
together with the boilers and other appurtenances. It is expected 
that the pumping station and its equipment will be finished by Jan- 
uary in the year 1904. 

An additional contribution will be needed for the completion of 
the High-level sewer, as appears in the special report of the Board 
to the Legislature, and also a small amount for the settlement of land 
damages on account of the Neponset River valley system. 

(3) Purchases and Takings of Land. 

Only two takings of real estate, covering an area of 6.96 acres, 
have been made for the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, both for the 
purposes of the High-level sewer in the South Metropolitan System, 
one being of easements in public ways in Milton, and the other of 
easements in parts of three public ways and in land of one private 
owner in Roxbury. 



List of Takings for Metropolitan Sewerage Works for the Tear 1902. 



No. 



LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION. 



Former Owners. 



Recorded. 



Sections and Purpose 
of Taking. 



Milton (in and from Canton Avenue, 
near Brook Road to Pine Tree Brook). 
Area, easements in 5.48 acres. 

Roxbury (in and near Vancouver Street) . 
Area, easements in 1.48 acres. 



Town of Milton, 



City of Boston et al., 



1902. 

May 9, 



Oct. 3, 



Section 61, High-level 
sewer. 



Section 78, High-level 
sewer. 



The above acreage in which easements were taken includes 6.91 
acres in public streets. 

Since January 1, 1902, settlements have been effected on account 
of the takings made in the North Metropolitan District in 4 cases, 
involving a payment of $34,719.92 ; and in cases in the South Met- 
ropolitan District 20 settlements have been effected, under which 
payments have been made amounting to $29,289.70. 



54 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Summary of Land Settlements for the Year 1902. 



LOCATION. 



Area in 
Acres. 



Number of 
Settlements. 



Payments. 



North Metropolitan District. 

Chelsea, 

Melrose, 

Boston (Charlestown), 

Total 

South Metropolitan District. 
West Roxbury, .... 

Roxbury, 

Boston, 

Quincy, 

Milton 

Dedharn, ..... 

Total 

Aggregates, 



1.075 

.260 

1.171 



2.506 



2.450 
.099 
.224 

1.767 
.249 
.035 

4.824 

7.330 



5 
8 

2 
4 
5 
1 

20 

24 



$500 00 

1 250 00 

32,969 92 



$34,719 92 



f 16,800 83 

850 00 

1,800 00 

5,873 75 

3,934 32 

30 80 



829,289 70 
$64,009 62 



VI. SEWERAGE WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

The sewerage department has in charge the care of the completed 
sewers and outlets, and the maintenance of the various pumping 
stations. 

The maintenance force consists of 47 engineers and other employes 
in charge of the pumping stations, and 33 men employed in connec- 
tion with the care of the sewers and of grounds about the stations. 

Prior to the present year, the teams necessary for the repair and 
care of the sewers and grounds were hired ; but this practice has 
been discontinued, and during the past year four teams and their 
equipments have been purchased for the works. 

(1) North Metropolitan System. 

Sewage is received into the Metropolitan sewers belonging to this 
District from local sewers haying a total length of 503.46 miles, and 
having 53,854 connections. 

The total number of gallons of sewage pumped has been 50,116,- 
025,000. Of this total, 18,814,800,000 gallons have been pumped 
at the Deer Island station, 18,067,200,000 gallons at the East Bos- 
ton station, 11,868,900,000 gallons at the Charlestown station, and 
1,365,125,000 gallons at the Ale wife Brook station. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 55 

The average cost of pumping per million gallons raised one foot, 
including labor at the screens, was, at the Deer Island station, 
$0,096 ; at the East Boston station, $0,076 ; at the Charlestown 
station, $0,179 ; and at the Alewife Brook station, $0,290. 

During the year an additional salt-water suction pipe, 12 inches in 
diameter, has been laid from the Deer Island pumping station to a 
point nearly 400 feet beyond high water, the outlet being at a depth 
of about 6 feet of water at low tide. 

The Shirley Gut siphon, which had been partly denuded by the 
changes in the bed of the channel, has been protected by the laying 
of a large quantity of additional riprap. 

A brick chamber, 14 feet square and 9 feet high, with granite trim- 
mings, has been erected at Charlestown over the siphon shaft of the 
sewer which crosses the Mystic River, including arrangements for 
extracting the gases which tend to accumulate in the shaft. 

(2) South Metropolitan System. 

Sewage is received in this system from local sewers having a length 
of 366.42 miles, and 17,978 connections. 

The Quincy pumping station is the only one as yet operated in 
the South Metropolitan System. The total number of gallons of 
sewage pumped here has been 814,007,000, at an average cost of 
$0,196 per million gallons raised one foot. 

VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

(1) Construction Loans and Receipts. 
The appropriations for the construction of the Metropolitan Sew- 
erage Works, the receipts which are added to the appropriations, 
and the expenditures for construction, have been as follows : — 

(a) JSforth Metropolitan System. 

Appropriations under various acts of the Legislature (given in 

detail in preceding report), , 85,605,865 73 

Proceeds from sales of property and from other sources to Decem- 
ber 31, 1902 (of which $469.20 is for the year 1902), . . . 16,526 73 

$5,622,392 46 
Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission 
and the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for payment 
to December 31,1902 (of which $56,161.71 is for the year 1902), 5,621,869 52 

Balance January 1, 1903, $522 94 



56 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



(b) South Metropolitan System. 

Charles River Valley Sewer. 
Appropriations under the Acts of the years 1899 and 1900, . . $800,046 27 
Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission for 
payment to December 31, 1902, 800,046 27 

No balance January 1, 1903, 

Neponset River Valley Seiver. 

Appropriations under various acts of the Legislature (given in 

detail in preceding report), $900,000 00 

Proceeds from pumping ground water, 109 50 

$900,109 50 
Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission 
and the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for payment 
to December 31, 1902 (of which $33,707.66 is for the year 1902), 899,997 82 

Balance January 1, 1903, $11168 

High-level Sewer. 

Appropriation under chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899, original loan, $4,600,000 00 
Proceeds from sales of property to December 31, 1902 (of which 

$1,020.71 is for the year 1902), 1,595 71 

$4,601,595 71 
Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission 

and the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for payment 

to December 31, 1902 (of which $2,078,095.43 is for the year 

1902) 3,841,988 01 

Balance January 1, 1903, $759,607 70 

(c) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund. 

Under authority of chapter 122 of the Acts of 1899, and section 
14 of chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899, the Treasurer of the Com- 
monwealth was required to consolidate the sinking funds of all the 
Metropolitan sewerage loans into one fund, to be known as the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund. 

The sinking fund as thus established has amounted at the end of 
each year to sums as follows : — 



December 31, 1899, $361,416 59 

December 31, 1900, 454,520 57 

December 31, 1901, 545,668 26 

December 31, 1902 636,084 04 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 57 



(2) Annual Appropriations and Receipts. 
The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to the 
appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for mainte- 
nance for the year ending December 31, 1902, have been as fol- 
lows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Balance January 1, 1902, $12,952 67 

Appropriation under chapter 51 of the Acts of 1902, . . . 103,400 00 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, .... 971 08 



$117,323 75 
Amount approved by the Boards for payment, .... 108,994 99 



Balance January 1, 1903, $8,328 76 



South Metropolitan System. 

Balance January 1, 1902 $11,519 28 

Appropriation under chapter 13 of the Acts of 1902, . . . 93,666 00 

Receipts from sales of property and from pumping, ... 22 60 



$105,207 88 
Amount approved by the Boards for payment, .... 99,668 11 



Balance January 1, 1903 $5,539 77 

The Board has also received, from rentals and from other sources, 
to be applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund requirements, $161.67. 

(3) Annual Assessments. 
The commissioners appointed under chapter 439 of the Acts of the 
year 1889, to determine the proportion in which each of the cities 
and towns forming the North Metropolitan System should annually 
pay money to meet the interest and sinking fund requirements, and 
to defray the cost of maintenance and operation of that system, deter- 
mined the proportions in percentages payable by the several cities and 
towns for the period beginning with the year 1901 and ending with 
the year 1905, as follows : — 



58 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CITY OR TOWN. 



Proportions in 
Percentages for 

Interest and 

Sinking Fund, 

based on 

Valuation. 



Proportions in 
Percentages for 

Maintenance 

and Operation, 

based on 

Population. 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston : — 
East Boston, 
Charlestown, 

Cambridge, . 

Chelsea. . 

Everett, . 

Lexington : — 
Centre Lexington, 
East Lexington, 

Maiden, . 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Somerville, 

Stoneham, 

Wakefield, . 

Winchester, . 

Winthrop, 

Woburn, 

Totals, . 



2.06 
.94 

20.66 

21.96 
8.14 
5.82 




100.00 



The commissioners appointed under chapter 424 of the Acts of the 
year 1899, to determine the proportion in which each of the cities 
and towns of the South Metropolitan System should annually make 
payment to meet the interest and sinking fund requirements, and to 
defray the cost of maintenance and operation of that system, deter- 
mined the proportions in percentages payable by the several cities 
and towns for the period beginning with the year 1900 and ending 
with the year 1904, to be as follows : — 



CITY OR TOWN. 



Proportions in 

Percentages for 

Interest and 

Sinking Fund, 

based on 

Valuation. 



Proportions in 
Percentages for 

Maintenance 

and Operation, 

based on 

Population. 



Waltham, 

Watertown, . 

Newton, 

Boston : — 

Brighton district, 
Back Bay district, 
Roxbury district, 
West Roxbury district, 
Dorchester district, . 

Brookliue, 

Dedham, 

Hyde Park, . 

Milton, .... 

Quincy, .... 

Totals, . 



5.08 

2.66 

15.30 



42.42 



100.00 



10.14 

3.78 

13.41 



43.30 



19.23 


7.86 


2.13 


3.02 


2.52 


5.75 


5.75 


2.68 


4.91 


10.06 



100.00 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



59 



(4) EXPENDITURES FOR THE DlFFEREXT WORKS. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the 
various operations for the different works : — 



CONSTRUCTION. 



For Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 



From Begiuning of Work 
to December 31, 1902. 



North Metropolitan System. 
Original system, main line and branches, 
Lexington branch, 
Everett branch, . 
Wakefield branch, 
Stoneham branch, 
Chelsea and Everett outlets, 
Waketield branch extension, 

Total, North Metropolitan System, 



South Metropolitan System. 
Charles River valley sewer, . . . . 
Neponset River valley sewer, main line, . 

Brookline branch, 

Total, 

High-level sewer : — 

Section 43, Quincy, 

Section 44, Quincy, 

Section 45, Quincy 

8ection 46, Quincy, 

Section 47, Quincy, 

Section 48, Quincy, 

Sections 48 and 49, Quincy, .... 

Section 49, Quincy 

Section 50, Quincy 

Section 51, Quincy, 

Section 52, Quincy 

Section 53, Quincy, 

Section 54, Quincy, 

Section 55, Quincy and Milton, 

Section 56, Milton, 

Section 57, Milton 

Section 58, Milton 

Section 59, Milton, 

Section 60, Milton 

Section 61, Milton, 

Section 62, Milton, 

Section 63, Milton, 

Section 64, Neponset River crossing, 

Section 65, Hyde Park, 

Section 66, Hyde Park 

Section 67, Hyde Park, Stony Brook cross- 
ing 

Section 68, Hyde Park and Roxbury, . 

Section 69, West Roxbury, . 

Section 70, West Roxbury, .... 

Section 71, West Roxbury, . 

Section 72, West Roxbury 

Section 73, West Roxbury, . . . . 

Section 74, West Roxbury and Roxbury, 

Section 75, Roxbury, 

Section 76, Roxbury, cast-iron force main, . 

Section 77, Roxbury, Ward Street pumping 
station, 

Section 78, Roxbury, connecting sewer, 

Real estate, 

Apportionment Commission, . . . . 

Administration, 

Total 

Total, South Metropolitan System, . 



Total for construction, both systems, 



$39,592 15 



3,195 70 
13,373 86 



$8,001 48 
25,706 18 



$123,092 58 

88,575 18 

8,732 16 

23,800 91 

96,080 92 

6,243 21 

53,358 74 

48,603 95 

93,385 88 

25,739 07 

120,962 90 

76,061 79 

89,595 86 

189,630 28 

21.722 67 
56,794 40 
85,235 05 
89,903 88 

52.723 64 
89,924 56 
19,155 24 
42,179 31 
40,138 37 

108 75 
102,675 36 

23,837 05 

218 16 

101 50 

25,100 73 

4,240 25 

10,976 90 

190,751 38 

24,552 13 

82,237 04 

3,890 39 

15,552 07 

6,751 70 

36,602 66 

8,858 81 



$56,161 71 



$33,707 66 



2,078,095 43 



. $2,111,803 09 



$2,167,964 80 



$5,190,374 68 
68,585 15 
54,877 12 
35,698 29 
11,574 10 
71,001 41 
189,758 77 



$864,804 16 
35,193 66 



$131,664 45 

94,774 61 

12,357 78 

27,598 52 

104,524 20 

11,213 76 

77,811 74 

106,093 13 

104,268 86 

86,976 85 

183,842 22 

84,509 94 

97,110 65 

296,291 39 

104,834 22 

65.138 33 
91,408 33 

100,068 28 
57,105 74 
93,501 21 

129,258 27 

126,597 68 
43,995 65 
40,611 88 

217,533 49 

31.139 46 
78,431 ^2 

101,963 14 
111,608 17 
91,828 92 
122,228 88 
230,429 66 
146,880 41 
118,439 82 
7,472 51 

26,525 86 

7,992 60 

291,381 11* 

2,000 00 

34,574 47 



$5,621,869 52 



$800,046 27 



899,997 82 



3,841,988 01 
S5.542.032 10 



$11,163,901 62 



* Including $61,300.20 paid for Ward Street pumping station lot, and estimated amount of $14,000 for 
part of Adams estate purchase on account of sand for use in connection with construction of Section 48. 



60 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



MAINTENANCE. 


For Year ending 
December 31, 1902. 


From Beginning 

of Work to 

December 31, 1902. 




$108,994 99 
99,668 11 


$661,940 38 
548,549 90 




$208,663 10 


$1,210,490 28 





(5) Detailed Financial Statement. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, 
receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 
1902: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF EXPENDITURES. 



For Year ending 

December 31, 

1902. 



North Metropolitan System — Construction 
Engineers, inspectors, rodnien, laborers and others, 

Advertising, 

Postage, telephone and telegrams, 

Books, maps, plans, blue prints and photography, 

Carriage hire and travelling expenses, . 

Teaming and express, 

Tools and repairs of same, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies, . 
Contracts : — 

Chelsea and Everett outlets : — 

H. A. Hanscom & Co., Sect. 56, 

H. A. Hanscom & Co., Sect. 57, 
Wakefield branch extension: — 

Bruno, Salomone & Petitti, Sect. 58, 

Chas. G. Belden & Co., Sect. 59, 



Metropolitan Contracting Co., Sect 
Land takings, purchase and recording, 
Experts and appraisers, . 
Legal services, .... 
Claims and allowances on contracts, 
Pumps and alterations, pumping plants, 



60 (part) 



Total, 



Nej) onset River Valley Sewer — Construction 
Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 
Postage, telephone and telegrams, 
Books, maps, plans, blue prints and photography, 

Engineering supplies, 

Carriage hire and travelling expenses, . 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies, . 

Amount carried forward, .... 



$43 21 

5 43 

31 99 

38 

9 75 

21 50 

4 05 

757 18 



1,470 93 

1,148 83 

2,584 77 

2,511 57 

6,277 33 

34,773 72 

3,581 07 

65 00 

1,000 00 

1,875 00 



$56,161 71 



$1,365 00 

68 65 

1 90 

38 63 

68 30 

1,014 76 



!,557 24 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



61 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF EXPENDITURES. 



For Year ending 

December 31, 

1902. 



Amount brought forward, 

Neponset River Valley Sewer — Construction— Con. 
Contracts : — 

Brookline branch : — 

Thos. J. Kelley, Sect. 30, ... 
Land takings, purchase and recording, . 
Experts and appraisers, 



Total, 



Construction. 



others, 



High-level Sewer- 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, engineer and auditor, . 

Clerical services, 

Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and 
Advertising, ...... 

Office supplies, 

Postage, telephone and telegrams, 

Books, maps, plans, blue prints and photography, 

Printing maps and reports, 

Engineering instruments and repairs of same, 

Engineering supplies, .... 

Carriage hire and travelling expenses, . 

Repairs, fittings and supplies, main office, 

Rent of office, Pemberton Building, 

Rent of sub-offices, . 

Water rates and connections, . 

Rent of office, Ashburton Place, 

Rent of Farrington lot, . 

Rent of wharf, Quincy, . 

Teaming and express, 

Tools and repairs of same, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies, 

Contracts : — 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., Sect. 43, 

Hiram \V. Phillips, Sect 43 

Win. H. Ellis, Nut Island Wharf, 

Wm. II. Ellis, Riprap at Nut Island, . 

Wm. H. Ellis, Nut Island Embankment, . 

Latta & Terry Co., Sect. 45, .... 

John Cashman, Sect. 46 

Chas. G. Belden & Co., Sect. 47, . 

Chas. G. Belden & Co., Sects. 48, 49, embankments, 

Chas. G. Belden & Co., Sect. 49, . 

Chas. G. Belden & Co., Sect 50, . 

Thomas F. Moore, Sect. 51, 

National Contracting Co., Sect. 52, 

National Contracting Co., Sect. 53, 

National Contracting Co., Sect. 54, 

H. P. Nawn, Sect. 55, 

National Contracting Co., Sect. 56, 

Amount carried forward, .... 



$2,557 24 



22,544 44 
6,681 63 
1,924 35 



$33,707 66 



$2,333 34 


4,525 


00 


3,715 


83 


193,600 


96 


240 


66 


2,315 


61 


1,619 


60 


677 


13 


126 


67 


567 


85 


2,405 


91 


5,380 


15 


219 


55 


3,127 


00 


653 


13 


7,137 


51 


600 


00 


300 


00 


900 00 


3,569 


33 


12,660 98 


97,187 


28 


76,610 


28 


17,236 


51 


10,245 


04 


20,554 


24 


73,759 


37 


7,854 


59 


20,885 


34 


89,568 


36 


48,791 


33 


44,581 


63 


86,231 


99 


24,016 


76 


115,045 


25 


71,845 


13 


85,638 


20 


166,533 


50 



20,799 86 



$1,324,060 87 



62 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





For Year ending 


GENERAL CHARACTER OF EXPENDITURES. 


December 31, 
1902. 


Amount brought forward, 


$1,324,060 87 


High-level Sewer — Construction — Con. 




Contracts — Con. 




John W. Bustin & Co., Sect. 57, 


53,725 33 


Latta & Terry Co., Sect. 58, 






78,770 29 


H. P. Nawn, Sect. 59, 






85,819 84 


John W. Bustin & Co., Sect. 60, . 






49,765 59 


Chas. G. Belden & Co., Sect. 61, . 






83,617 13 


E. W. Everson & Co., Sect. 62, . 






17,145 31 


National Contracting Co , Sect. 63, 






39,448 71 


United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., 


Sect.64, 




5,246 87 


E. W. & J. J. Everson, Sect. 66, . 






94,305 31 


Charles Linehan, Sect. 70, . 






21,387 33 


Charles F. Taylor & Co., Sect. 71, . . 






4,206 98 


Jones & Meehan, Sect. 72, . 






8,800 70 


National Contracting Co., Sect. 73 (part), . 






447 10 


H. P. Nawn, Sect. 73 (part), 






36,348 05 


James Russell Boiler Works Co., Sect. 73 (part 


)', ! 




9,823 45 


H. P. Nawn, Sect. 74, . . .- . 






21,624 69 


E. W. Everson & Co., Sect. 75, . 






75,030 63 


L. P. Soule & Son, Sect. 77, building, 






7,613 89 


Patrick McGovern, Sect. 78, ... 






5,894 70 


Land takings, purchase and recording, . 






22.803 42 


Experts and appraisers, ..... 






12,480 64 


Legal services, 






1,728 60 


Claims and allowances on contracts, 






18,000 00 




$2,078,095 43 


North Metropolitan System — Maintenance. 




Administration : — 




Commissioners, secretary, auditor and assistants, 


$1,762 50 


Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 




36 32 


Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices, 




190 81 


Miscellaneous expenses, 




20 52 


General superintendence : — 






Engineer and assistants, 




4,269 11 


Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 




382 71 


Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices, 




638 97 


Miscellaneous expenses, 




105 78 


Deer Island pumping station : — 






Labor, 




10,834 54 


Coal, 








6,772 59 


Oil and waste, 








261 12 


Water, 








1,244 40 


Packing, 








155 08 


Repairs and renewals, .... 








488 57 


Telephones and office supplies, . 








222 37 


Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 








3,194 62 


Salt water suction pipe, 








6,457 72 


Amount carried forward, 


• 


• 


• 


$37,037 73 



;N T o. 57.] 



AXD SEWERAGE BOARD, 



63 



GENERAL CHARACTER OF EXPENDITURES. 



For Year ending 

December 31, 

1902. 



Amount brought forward, 

North Metropolitan System — Maintenance — Con- 
East Boston pumping station 

Labor, . 

Coal, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Charlestown pumping station : — 

Labor, . 

Coal, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, . 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 
Alewife Brook pumping station : — 

Labor, . 

Coal, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, . 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Sewer lines, labor, .... 

Supplies and expenses, 

Shirley Gut, .... 

Charlestown gate-house, 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, 



17,037 73 



10,289 99 

7,192 89 

221 36 

836 40 

60 83 

967 92 

147 77 

2,525 69 

10,103 94 

3,396 57 

238 98 

441 60 

81 93 

437 38 

181 17 

2,239 88 



Total, 



South Metropolitan System — Maintenance 
Administration : — 

Commissioners, secretary, auditor and assistants, 
Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 
General superintendence : — 

Engineer and assistants, . . . 
Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

•Charles River valley sewer : — 

Sewer lines, labor, 

Supplies and expenses, 

City of Boston, for pumping and interest, 
Stable account, ...... 



Amount carried forward, 



3,039 

1,692 

179 

212 

26 

246 

134 

1,052 

14,902 

5,260 

611 

1,971 

3,262 



87 
71 
51 
24 
78 
04 
75 
35 
49 
04 
25 
99 
94 



8108,994 99 



$200 00 
17 34 

1,196 67 
70 72 
16 20 

4,684 72 

348 12 

60,402 32 

39 50 



§66,975 59 



64 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





For Year ending 


GENERAL CHARACTER OF EXPENDITURES. 


December 31, 




1902. 


Amount brought forward, 


$66,975 59 


South Metropolitan System — Maintenance — Con. 




Neponset Kiver valley sewer : — 




Sewer lines, labor, 


1,301 65 


Supplies and expenses, 


437 72 


City of Boston, for pumping and interest, .... 


23,489 79 


Quincy pumping station : — 




Labor, 


3,242 12 


Coal, 


1,798 12 


Oil and waste, 


49 09 


Water, 


182 34 


Packing, 


15 14 


Repairs and renewals, 


107 70 


Telephones and office supplies, 


39 09 


Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, ..... 


1,029 76 


City of Boston, for discharge of sewage, 


1,000 00 




$99,668 11 



(b) Receipts. 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources have been credited as follows : — 





For Year ending 

December 31, 

1902. 


From Beginning of 

Work to 
December 31, 1902. 


North Metropolitan System, — construction, 
Neponset River valley sewer, — construction, 
High-level sewer, — construction, 
North Metropolitan System, — maintenance, 
South Metropolitan System, — maintenance, 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 


8469 20 

1,020 71 

971 08 

22 60 

161 67 


$16,526 73 

109 50 

1,595 71 

1,296 10 

32 60 

480 52 


Totals, 


$2,645 26 


$20,041 16 



(c) Assets. 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies ; engineering and scientific instruments and 
supplies ; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc. ; machinery, tools and other 
appliances and supplies; real estate connected with works not completed; 
completed works, including real estate connected therewith. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



65 



(d) Liabilities. 
There are liabilities as follows : — 

Current bills unpaid § 36,892 72* 

Due on monthly pay rolls, 1,681 00 

$38,573 72 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or 

until Claims are settled. 



NAME. 


Work. 


Amount. 


North Metropolitan Construction : — 






Jones & Meehan 


Original work, Sect. 44, 


$32 00 


H. A. Hanscom & Co., . 




Sect. 56, held for claims, 


200 00 


Neponset Valley System : — 








E.W. Everson & Co., . 




' Original work, Sect. 25, 


50 00 


Thomas J. Kelley, 




Sect. 30, 


1,551 94 


High-level sewer : — 








Wm. H Ellis, 




Sect. 43, wharf at Nut Island, 


539 21 


Hiram W. Phillips, 




Sect. 43, outlet, pipe laying, . 


3,041 75 


Wm. H. Ellis, 




Sect. 44, . . . . 


3,882 07 


Latta & Terry Co., 




Sect. 45, 


1,386 11 


John Cashman, 




Sect. 46, embankments, . 


1,099 23 


Charles G Belden & Co., 




Sect. 47, 


4,914 37 


Charles G. Belden & Co., 




Sects. 48 and 49, embankments, 


3,577 90 


Charles G Belden & Co., 




Sect. 49, second part, 


5,030 89 


Charles G. Belden & Co., 




Sect. 50, 


4,865 36 


National Contracting Co., 




Sect. 52, 


21,742 98 


National Contracting Co., 




Sect. 53, 


13,371 85 


National Contracting Co., 




Sect. 54, 


4,674 56 


H. P. Nawn, . 




Sect 55, 


4,283 88 


J. W Bustin & Co., 




Sect. 57, 


3,010 20 


Latta & Terry Co., 




Sect. 58, 


2,000 00 


H. P. Nawn, . 




Sect. 59, 


4,171 84 


J. W. Bustin & Co., 




Sect. 60, 


2,619 27 


Charles G. Belden & Co., 




Sect. 61, 


14,755 95 


E. W. Everson & Co., . 




Sect. 62, reserved for repairs, 


100 00 


E. W. & J. J. Everson, . 




Sect. 66, 


29,161 71 


Charles Linehan, . 




Sect. 70, 


5,095 37 


National Contracting Co., 




Sect. 73, contract abandoned, 


5,516 17 


H. P. Nawn, . 




Sect. 73, part, 


2,884 95 


James Russell Boiler Works 


Co.,! 


Sect. 73, day work, part, 


1,733 55 


E. W. Everson & Co., . 




Sect. 75, 


7,358 35 


L. P. Soule &Son,. 




Sect. 77, Ward St., building, . 


1,343 63 


Patrick McGovern, 




Sect. 78 


1,040 24 


United States Cast Iron Pipe and 






Foundry Co., .... 


Sect. 43, outlet, and Sect. 64, . 


14,445 39 






$ 169,480 72 



* Miscellaneous current bills of 1902 and those coming in from time to time after January 1, 1903, have 
since been paid. 



66 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Settlement has been made with Elizabeth J. Wright for the sum 
of $75, but the deed has not yet passed. 

On the claims of the following it is impossible to state the amounts 
due for land and other damages, as suits are now pending in the 
courts for the determination of the same : — 

City of Boston, Henry W. Hunt et al., Peter P. Veale, Margaret 
Noon, Evangelical Lutheran Church, Charles L. Flint, Jacob Schef- 
freen, Theodore H. Tyndale, Mary E. Connolly, Mary Rohan and 
Charles C. Hodgkinson. 

VIII. ADMISSION OF OTHER MUNICIPALITIES INTO THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

No municipalities have been admitted into the Metropolitan Water 
District during the past year. Negotiations have, however, taken 
place with the authorities of the towns of Milton and Lexington for 
the admission of these towns into the District, and it is expected 
that both will be admitted early in the present year. 

An arrangement was entered into on February 26, 1902, with the 
Milton Water Company, by which it was agreed that the Board 
would furnish water to the company for the water supply of the 
town of Milton upon the payment of the sum of $5,000, and upon 
its agreement that the company should maintain meters upon all ser- 
vices and furnish water at meter rates ; and also that the company 
should pay to the Commonwealth a sum equal to the amount of the 
annual assessment which the town of Milton would, if it were a part 
of the Metropolitan Water District, be required to pay in each year. 
The agreement was made to continue in force until and including the 
year 1911, or until the company should cease to furnish water to the 
town, provided the latter event should occur prior to the expiration 
of said term of years. 

IX. CONSUMPTION AND WASTE OF WATER. 

The cities and towns supplied wholly or in part by the Metropol- 
itan WaterWorks have consumed an average of 107,268,000 gallons 
of water daily, — a consumption per inhabitant of 123 gallons per 
day. This is an increase of 5,776,000 gallons over that of the year 
1901. There was an increase in the consumption per inhabitant, 
assuming a normal increase of population in the year, of 3 gallons 
per day. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 67 

The average daily consumption of all the cities and towns in the 
Metropolitan Water District, including Newton and Hyde Park, 
which are not supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works, was 
110,145,000 gallons, and the average daily consumption per inhab- 
itant in these cities and towns was 119.5 gallons. 

CD 

The population of the Metropolitan Water District, including 
Swampscott and Milton, is estimated now to be 921,600, and that 
of the cities and towns now supplied with water from the Metro- 
politan Water Works is estimated to be 874,200. 

The population and consumption of water of the town of Milton 
are included in the foregoing statistics for the year 1902, but were 
not included in those for the year 1901. 

The principal increase in the consumption of water took place in 
the month of December, when there occurred an unusually cold 
period, and when the consumption in one day reached the unprece- 
dented quantity of 151,105,000 gallons. This great increase was 
largely due to the use or misuse of water in order to prevent the 
freezing of services on account of defective or improper plumbing, 
and an average daily consumption of 4,500,000 gallons for the entire 
year was due to this cause. 

The increase of consumption for the entire year was greatest in 
the southern high-service district, so-called, embracing the high- 
service district of Boston, Quincy, Watertown, Belmont, and a part 
of Milton. There was a similar increase, though to a somewhat less 
extent, in the southern extra-high service district, embracing the 
high portions of West Roxbury and of Milton, and* in the southern 
low-service district, embracing the low-service district of Boston, 
with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston. In the other 
sections there was either a slight increase or a slight decrease in the 
consumption. 

It is to be noted that there was no long-continued period of drought 
in the summer, such as in some years occasions an excessive con- 
sumption of water for the sprinkling of lawns and other like pur- 
poses, similar in effect to the demands caused by the freezing weather 
of winter. The larger part of the summer, on account of the fre- 
quent rains, was unusually favorable for a moderate consumption. 

There was, however, observed in the early summer a considerable 
tendency toward the violation of the regulations made for the use 
of hand hose and automatic sprinklers. A general inspection was 



68 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

instituted throughout the District for the purpose of marking these 
violations. By far the largest number of violations of the regula- 
tions were found to occur in a very few municipalities, — in the 
towns of Nahant and Swampscott and the city of Medford. The 
cases were at once reported to the. water officials of the several cities 
and towns, who generally co-operated with the Board in the enforce- 
ment of the regulations. As a consequence, there was later a great 
decrease in the number of violations, and a considerable decrease in 
the general consumption from what it otherwise would have been 
undoubtedly resulted from the enforcement of the regulations. 

It was voted by the Board, on February 28, 1902, in accordance 
with a notice which had been previously given, that the minimum 
rate to be paid for the use of hand hose in the cities and towns of the 
Metropolitan Water District for the year 1902 be established at $4. 

It was further voted, on November 8, 1902, on recommendation 
of the chief engineer, " that, until otherwise provided, the minimum 
rate which shall be approved for the use of hand hose for lawn 
sprinkling shall be fixed at $4 per annum, such use to be in con- 
formity with the regulations of the Board which were made on 
August 2, 1901." 

The following are the regulations made on August 2, 1901, and 
now in force relative to the use of hand hose and lawn sprinklers : — 

The use of water through hand hose on premises where the water supply 
is not metered shall be restricted to two hours in each day, such use to be 
had between the hours of 5 and 8 a.m. and 5 and 8 p.m. 

The hose must be used with a nozzle not exceeding three-sixteenths of 
an inch in diameter, and while so used must be held in the hand of a per- 
son on the premises of the water taker. 

On premises where the water supply is metered the above restrictions do 
not apply, and a lawn sprinkler may be attached to the hose. 

Automatic or rotary lawn sprinklers are allowed only in case the 
water is metered. 

The experience and the investigations of the year confirm the Board 
in the belief that the present annual consumption of water — so much 
in excess of the estimates made at the time of the passage of the 
Metropolitan Water Act in the year 1895 — is greater than is neces- 
sary, and that there is no inconsiderable waste and misuse of water. 
It is proper to repeat that this increase in the consumption not only 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 69 

causes a great increase in the annual expenditures for maintenance 
and operation, but, more than all, hastens the time when great 
expenditures must be incurred for new sources of supply, new 
pumping facilities, new aqueducts, new pipe mains and all other 
equipment. It is for the interest of every municipality in the Dis- 
trict to co-operate with the Board in the adoption of all reasonable 
measures for the prevention of leakages, waste and misuse of water. 
The quality of the water has continued about the same as in the 
previous year. 

X. THE MEASUREMENT OF WATER SUPPLIED TO THE 
VARIOUS MUNICIPALITIES AND THE PREVENTION OF 
UNNECESSARY OR IMPROPER USE OR WASTE. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board was authorized, by 
chapter 391 of the Acts of the General Court of the year 1902, to 
construct and maintain such works, and to provide such other means 
as it should deem necessary for measuring the water supplied to each 
of the cities and towns in the Metropolitan Water District. The 
Board was required to report to the General Court in the year 1903 
the quantity of water supplied to each of the cities and towns in 
the District, and whether water is used unnecessarily or improperly 
therein ; and to make recommendations as to the manner in which 
waste might be prevented, and also as to the manner in which the 
consumption of water might be considered in the apportionment of 
the annual assessments among the cities and towns for the construc- 
tion and maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works. This Act 
was approved on May 13, 1902. 

The engineers of the Board, in anticipation of the passage of the 
Act, had already made studies necessary for determining the number 
and size of meters required for measuring the water supplied to the 
several cities and towns. It was determined that there would be 
required nearly or quite 50 meters, in sizes for pipes ranging from 
8 inches to 48 inches in diameter. The Venturi meter was selected 
for the purposes of measurement, as this is the only device which 
has been practically tested in actual service for measuring and 
recording the quantity of water flowing through pipes larger than 
6 inches in diameter. 

Negotiations had also been had with the manufacturers of the 
meters in relation to the furnishing of the number required. A 



70 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

definite proposition for the manufacture of the meters was at once 
requested, and on June 20 a contract for 42 meters was made with 
the Builders Iron Foundry of Providence, R. I., the only company 
which manufactures these meters. It was provided in the contract 
that 40 meters should be delivered from time to time up to November 
1, 1902, and it was expected that these could be set and made avail- 
able for use before the close of the year. This, however, has been 
found impossible to accomplish. The manufacturers of the meters 
have encountered the same difficulties which have been experienced 
by other large manufacturers throughout the country in obtaining 
the necessary castings, so that but 24 of the meters were received in 
season to be set before December 15, when the cold weather caused 
a suspension of all work for the season. A still greater delay has 
been experienced in the delivery of the registering apparatus, and, 
in fact, none of the meters were, on January 1, 1903, completed 
and in service. 

Contracts were also made with the Daniel Russell Boiler Works 
of South Boston for steel chambers in which to place the registering 
apparatus of the meters. 

It has, therefore, been impossible to any considerable extent to 
measure the water supplied to the various municipalities in the 
District, and such measurement cannot be fully made for some 
months to come. The obtaining of the information thus to be 
acquired, and of the results which are anticipated to follow from the 
introduction of the various meters, is necessarily antecedent to 
determining whether water is used in the various cities and towns 
unnecessarily or improperly, as well as to making any recommen- 
dations regarding the manner in which any waste may be prevented, 
and the apportionment of the annual assessments among the cities 
and towns. 

The contract for the 42 Venturi meters involved an expense of 
$31,158.45, to which will be added the expense of registering cham- 
bers, valves and some other castings, and the labor required in the 
setting of the meters. It was estimated, before the legislation was 
passed, that the sum of about $100,000 would be required to accom- 
plish the work. 

The facilities afforded for the measuring of water consumed in the 
town of Stoneham developed the fact that there was an extraordinary 
consumption of about 125 gallons per day for each inhabitant. As 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 71 

there was little water used in the town for manufacturing purposes, 
it was evident that there must exist some leakage or waste which 
had not been ascertained by the local authorities. By a series of 
experiments the waste was localized, and leaks in the street mains 
were found, by which, with the co-operation of the local authorities, 
the average daily consumption was reduced by more than one-half. 
Although it is not anticipated that like leakages will be found in 
general throughout the District, the Board believes that the infor- 
mation to be obtained will lead to* the prevention of considerable 
leakages in various localities of the District. It greatly regrets that 
it is obliged to postpone, even for a short period, this exceedingly 
important investigation. 

The Act required the Board to report at the present session of the 
Legislature. The Board has requested that, under the circumstances, 
further time be granted in which to make a report in accordance 
with the provisions of the Act, and that the time for report be ex- 
tended until February 1, 1904. 

XI. ELECTROLYSIS AFFECTING IRON PIPES. 

Owing to the large amount of construction in progress, it has been 
found impossible for the engineering force to devote as much atten- 
tion as was desired to the continued investigation of the injurious 
action of electric currents upon the iron pipe lines. An arrange- 
ment has been made with the Boston Elevated Railway Company, 
by which, in certain places where the trouble exists, tests have been 
applied, and by these means measurements are made of the amount 
of electricity flowing along the pipes, and of the amount flowing 
from them. It is certain that the destructive action of the electric 
currents continues, and a remedy must speedily be applied. The 
investigation of the action of electricity upon the iron pipes will be 
more vigorously pursued in the future. 

XII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ADDITIONAL APPROPRIA- 
TIONS FOR SEWERAGE WORKS. 

In its special report made to the Legislature at the beginning of 
the year, the Board, inasmuch as the sewerage systems which had 
been authorized had been completed, or were approaching comple- 
tion, called attention to the appropriations which would be required 



72 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

for the completion of the unfinished works, to be largely accom- 
plished, as expected, during the coming year. 

The statements and recommendations of the Board were as fol- 
lows : — 

(a) North Metropolitan System. 

All of the works which have been authorized to be constructed on ac- 
count of the North Metropolitan System have been completed, and there 
appears to be a balance of the appropriations authorized for the purposes 
under various acts, amounting, on January 1, 1903, to $522.94. 

There are, however, several old suits for damages arising on account of 
the construction of the system, which have not yet been settled. It is esti- 
mated that the sum of $250,000 may be required for the settlement of these 
suits. 

(b) South Metropolitan System. 

The building of the High-level sewer, which forms a part of the South 
Metropolitan System, was authorized by chapter 424 of the Acts of the 
year 1899. The Metropolitan Sewerage Commission, in making up its 
estimates prior to the recommendation for legislation, estimated that the 
cost of the work of construction of the High-level sewer, in accordance with 
the plans which it submitted, would amount to $4,600,000. The Legisla- 
ture passed the act, in general adopting the recommendations of the Com- 
mission, but providing, in section 1 of said chapter 424, that the sewer and 
the proposed outlet in Boston harbor should not be constructed until plans 
for the outlet should be considered by the Commission and adopted and 
approved by the State Board of Health. Subsequently the question of the 
outlet of the sewer was so considered, and the State Board of Health 
required that the outlet should be located about 2,000 feet further seaward 
than was contemplated in the preliminary report. This requirement of the 
State Board of Health has necessitated the laying of nearly 5,700 linear feet 
of additional 60-inch pipe, and will involve an expense of about $230,000. 

The State Board of Health, in considering the question of sewage dis- 
posal into Boston harbor, under a Resolve of the Legislature, recommended, 
in its report made in the year 1900, that certain areas in the towns of 
Wellesley, Needham and Weston, though situated upon the north side of 
the Charles River, should be connected with the South Metropolitan Sys- 
tem, or High-level sewer. The Commission accordingly caused an enlarge- 
ment to be made of the sewer, practically throughout its whole length, 
which has required an additional expenditure of substantially $75,000. N 

Section 2 of said chapter 424 provided that the cost of the original inves- 
tigations and surveys, which had been paid under the original Resolve by 
the various cities and towns affected, should be repaid to these cities and 
towns, and that the same should form a part of the cost of construction of 
the sewer. The repayment of this amount required the sum of $25,677.96. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 

The Metropolitan Sewerage Commission, in its estimates made prior to 
the High-level sewer act, provided for the building of a pumping station at 
Ward Street in Roxbury only large enough for the installation of two pump- 
ing engines. The rapid development, however, of the Metropolitan District 
tributary to this station, and the great increase in the volume of sewage, 
has convinced the present Board that the time is not far distant when an 
additional pumping engine will be required, and, consequently, that it was 
necessary to make a considerable enlargement of the building as originally 
contemplated. This change has involved an additional expense, estimated 
at $75,000. ' 

These sums, not contemplated by the original estimates, amount to 
$405,677.96. 

The Board has now endeavored to estimate the amount which will be 
required to complete the construction of the High-level sewer, in addition 
to these expenditures caused by changes in the original plans, and they 
estimate that the amount thus required will be about $1,250,000. For the 
purpose there is a balance in the treasury of $759,607.70. There will con- 
sequently be needed on account of construction the further sum of about 
$490,000. 

The estimates made by the Sewerage Commission, preliminary to the 
recommendation of the building of the sewer, were made at a time when 
both labor and supplies were to be obtained at a low price ; besides, minor 
changes have been made which have added to and increased the cost of the 
work. The additional cost under the later contracts would not seem to be 
in excess of what might properly be anticipated from the large advance in 
the cost of labor and supplies. 

The land damages on account of the construction of the High-level sewer, 
for which sums have been in several cases recovered in suits, have consider- 
ably exceeded the preliminary estimates of the Metropolitan Sewerage 
Commission. In order to satisfy all of these claims, it is estimated that 
the sum of $100,000 will be required. 

No additional appropriations have been asked for since the construction 
of the High-level sewer was originally authorized. 

The Neponset River Valley System, which now forms a part of the South 
Metropolitan System, had been substantially completed ; but in the year 
1901 the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board was directed to extend 
the sewer a considerable distance, to meet the needs of the city of Newton 
and the town of Brookline, and the sum of $40,000 was appropriated for 
this work. The work of extension has now been about completed, and the 
expense will undoubtedly come within the appropriation ; but the payment 
of some old claims for land damages has so reduced the balance remaining 
on account of the Neponset River Valley Sewer that a small amount will 
be required on account of this branch of the South Metropolitan System. 
This amount is estimated at $4,000. 



74 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The Board, therefore, believes that the additional sum of $1,000,000 
should be provided for the completion of the South Metropolitan System, 
as now authorized, made up on account of the following items : — 



Extension of the outfall pipes further into Boston harbor, 
Provision for additional sewerage districts, 
Payment for original surveys and investigations, 
Enlargement of Ward Street pumping station, . 
Completion of construction of High-level sewer, 
Claims and suits for land damages on account of the construction of 
the High-level sewer, 



$230,000 00 

75,000 00 

25,677 96 

75,000 00 

490,000 00 

100,000 00 
Claims on account of construction of Neponset River Valley sewer, 4,000 00 



$999,677 96 



The Board, therefore, respectfully represents that, in their opinion, 
authority should be given for the issue of bonds to an amount not exceed- 
ing $250,000 on account of the North Metropolitan System, and to an 
amount not exceeding $1,000,000 on account of the South Metropolitan 
System. 

XIII. NECESSITY OF SEPARATE SEWER SYSTEMS FOR SEW- 
AGE EXCLUSIVELY. 

The greater and increasing consumption of water is allied with 
the established increase in the volume of sewage, — an increase 
which is growing entirely out of proportion to the anticipations 
entertained when the Metropolitan Sewerage System was designed. 
The larger consumption of water is, of course, but one of the factors 
tending to increase the amount of the sewage which has to be dis- 
posed of. 

When the construction of the earlier works of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage District was entered upon, the combined system, so-called, 
prevailed. The sewers at that time collected not only the sewage 
proper, that is, the domestic and manufacturing wastes, but also, in 
combination with this sewage, the rainfall. The proportion of 
rainfall thus provided for and collected by the intercepting sewers 
of the Metropolitan System was fixed at the lowest amount regarded 
as permissible under the prevailing conditions, and was generally 
equivalent to a depth of 0.01 of an inch of rainfall in an hour upon 
the territory served by the sewers. In this way the Metropolitan 
sewers collected from the contributing areas the sewage mingled 
with rainfall. Overflows were provided, however, in the contribut- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 75 

ing sewers, to be used in times of storms or larger rains, by which 
the combined sewage and rainfall in excess of the capacity of the 
intercepting sewers was discharged at outlets into rivers or streams. 

As the population has increased, especially in congested districts, 
the proportion of the element of sewage to the rainfall which over- 
flows into the streams has greatly increased, and has frequently 
created a most unsanitary and objectionable condition. The con- 
gestion and increase in population have also tended to call for the 
building of larger intercepting sewers, and to make the sewers 
already constructed, if not inadequate to the present demands, at 
least inadequate to provide for the period of time for which they 
were designed. The combined system thus developed would call 
for the construction of sewers to a size and extent which in their 
cost would be almost prohibitive. 

Both sanitary and economical considerations have, therefore, called 
for the building of separate sewers, so-called, that is, sewers 
in which sewage proper only should be received ; and that other 
works should be constructed by which all the rainfall may be con- 
veyed in separate conduits to the streams. 

The High-level sewer, now in process of construction, which will 
provide for the southern portion of the Metropolitan Sewerage Dis- 
trict, is designed to receive only sewage. The dimensions and 
consequent cost of this sewer, if based upon the combined system, 
would have been such as to have rendered the undertaking doubtful, 
if not impossible. 

The combined system in general prevails in the cities of Cam- 
bridge, Somerville, Chelsea, Everett, and in the town of Brookline, 
as well as in considerable portions of the city of Boston, although 
in these localities there have been constructed some sewers upon the 
separate system. 

It is apparent, therefore, that in substantially all cases sewers 
upon the separate system only should be connected with the High- 
level sewer. Such works as are necessary in the various cities and 
towns to provide for the disposal of the rain water by other methods 
should be speedily entered upon, so far as necessary to that end. 
By thus reducing the work which the Metropolitan sewers will be 
called upon to do, their capacity will be effectively increased, and 
the period will be prolonged at the end of which enlargements and 
duplications would otherwise be necessary. The necessity, also, of 



76 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

i 

providing for the disposal through the main sewers of the entire 
amount of the sewage of the various contributory regions, and the 
doing away with all overflow of sewage, however diluted, into the 
rivers and streams in times of heavy rainfall, is demanded by every 
consideration for the sanitary well-being of the Metropolitan District. 

XIV. INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS. 

The industrial conditions which have recently prevailed have 
largely affected the construction of the various works, and have 
brought considerable difficulties both to the Board and to the con- 
tractors. 

There has been an advance in prices of almost all classes of ma- 
terials and supplies which have entered into construction. This has 
been seen in the case of the prices charged for iron pipes, of which 
21,200 tons were purchased during the past year. Pipes were pur- 
chased for the Water Works in the year 1898 as low as $16.60 per 
ton, while rates as high as S27.70 per ton were required in the past 
year for large quantities purchased. An advance of $4 to $5 per 
ton was made in the past year over prices of the preceding year. 

There has been a like rise in prices for iron castings and for steel 
work, of which large quantities have been required for bridges and 
other purposes, and also for all the materials to be used in the con- 
struction of the various buildings which the Board is now called 
upon to construct. 

It has, moreover, frequently been impossible to obtain the mate- 
rials contracted for, especially iron and steel work, in the times fixed 
by the contracts ; and much trouble has resulted, both to the con- 
tractors of the Board and to the Commonwealth, on account of the 
failure to make due deliveries. 

The strike of the anthracite coal miners has made it difficult at 
periods to obtain a sufficient supply of coal with which to operate 
compressor plants, engines and locomotives used by the various 
contractors ; and the cost of the work has been materially increased 
by the great rise in the cost of coal, the prices paid being at times 
between 200 and 300 per cent, greater than in previous years. 

Considerable difficulty has also been experienced in obtaining 
sufficient cement, particularly Portland cement, and masonry con- 
struction has been at times seriously delayed on this account. This 
difficulty has been somewhat due to the shortage of coal, but has 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 77 

arisen mostly on account of the unprecedented demand for cement 
for construction purposes all over the country. 

The wages paid for labor have been higher than those paid for 
several years previous, and not infrequently upon the contracts it 
has been at times found difficult to obtain the number of men re- 
quired. Prices for skilled labor have most notably advanced. 

The great public works which are in process of construction 
throughout the country have also made large demands upon the 
engineering forces, and many members of the corps employed by 
the Board have been from time to time called to positions of larger 
responsibility elsewhere. 

As a consequence of these conditions, the cost of work has at 
times necessarily exceeded the prices and estimates figured upon the 
basis of former conditions, both by the Board and its contractors, 
and it has been rnade much more difficult to complete the various 
undertakings in the times set for their fulfilment. 

XV. FUTURE WORK. 

The amount of construction both upon the Metropolitan Water 
Works and the Sewerage Works has probably reached its maximum 
during the year 1902. The expenditures for construction of Water 
Works have been $3,657,389.30, and for the Sewerage Works the 
expenditures for construction have been $2,167,964.80. 

There will, however, be required a large amount of construction 
in both departments during the coming year. 

The cost of maintenance, which has been $294,045.14 for the 
Water Works and $208,663.10 for the Sewerage Works, will un- 
doubtedly increase from year to year. 

It is hoped that the Weston Aqueduct and the Weston Reservoir 
will both be substantially completed during the coming year, as 
well as the relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad. The 
building of the Wachusett Dam and Reservoir will be prosecuted as 
vigorously as in the past year. The construction of the terminal 
chamber, the various gate-houses and siphon and screen chambers, 
upon the Weston Aqueduct, will be carried on. 

It is expected that the High-level sewer will be largely completed, 
although much difficult work is still to be done, especially in the 
laying of the submarine pipes for the outlets off Nut Island. A 
large pumping station, with its engines and other equipment, is to 



78 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

be built at Ward Street in Roxbury, and a considerable building for 
the purposes of a screen chamber on Nut Island is to be constructed. 
Considerable attention will necessarily be devoted to the abate- 
ment of sources of pollution of the water supply, and thorough 
investigations will be made as to the unnecessary and improper con- 
sumption of water and the stopping of waste and leakages. 

The report of the Chief Engineer relating to the Metropolitan 
Water Works, and the report of the Engineer of the Sewerage 
Works, are herewith submitted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY H. SPRAGUE. 
HENRY P. WALCOTT. 

JAMES A. BAILEY, Jr. 

Boston, February 26, 1903. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 79 



EEPOET OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the operations of the 
Engineering Department of the Metropolitan Water Works for the 
year ending December 31, 1902. 

Organization. 

Owing to ill health, Desmond FitzGerald, who has held important 
positions on. the Boston and Metropolitan Water Works, continu- 
ously, for twenty-nine years, was obliged to discontinue work on 
October 17, and later tendered his resignation as engineer of the 
Sudbury Department, which was accepted on November 15. Mr. 
FitzGerald has always been foremost in advocating and adopting 
measures to raise the standard of water supplies, and his work in 
connection with the better preparation of reservoirs, the biological 
examination of waters and the protection of waters from pollution 
is well known to engineers, and has been of great value to the city 
of Boston and the Metropolitan Water District. 

As the work remaining to be done in the Sudbury Department is 
chiefly the maintenance of the works, no one has been employed to 
take Mr. FitzGerald's place, but the duties of the department have 
been divided, the charge of the storage reservoirs and other works 
on the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, with the exception of 
the improvements at Lake Cochituate, and of the Sudbury and 
Cochituate aqueducts, being given to Charles E. Haberstroh, the 
assistant superintendent; and the charge of the improvements at 
Lake Cochituate, of the Boston office, including the work of the 
biological laboratory, of the determination of the sources from 
which water shall be drawn through the aqueducts and of records 
and reports, being given to Charles W. Sherman, division engineer, 
who was Mr. FitzGerald's principal assistant in Boston. Mr. Sher- 
man was also given temporary charge of Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
and grounds, which you have already voted to transfer to the Distri- 
bution Department on January 1, 1903. 



80 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Another important change in the personnel of the force was 
caused by the resignation of Alfred D. Flinn, principal office 
assistant, which took effect October 6, to accept the position of 
managing editor of the "Engineering Record." By Mr. Flinn's 
resignation the State has lost a very valuable and efficient assistant. 
His place has been filled by the transfer of Frank T. Daniels, divi- 
sion engineer of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, to the Metro- 
politan Water Works. 

The list of assistants reporting directly to the Chief Engineer at 
the end of the year is as follows : — 

Dexter Brackett, . . . Engineer of Distribution Department.' 

Thomas F. Richardson, . . Engineer of Dam and Aqueduct Department. 

Hiram A. Miller, . . . Engineer of Reservoir Department. 
Horace Ropes, .... Engineer of Weston Aqueduct Department. 

Charles E. Haberstroh, . Assistant Superintendent, Sudbury Department 

Charles W. Sherman, . . Division Engineer, Sudbury Department. 

Frank T. Daniels, . . . Principal Office Assistant. 

John N. Ferguson, . . . Office Assistant. 

Joseph P. Davis, A. Fteley and Hiram F. Mills have continued 
as consulting engineers. 

John W. Lynch has continued in direct charge of the pumping 
stations at Chestnut Hill, and in general charge of the mechanical 
work at all other pumping stations of the Distribution Department. 

George E. Wilde has continued as assistant superintendent in the 
Distribution Department, in immediate charge of the maintenance 
and operation of the pipe lines and other works within the Met- 
ropolitan District, with the exception of the pumping stations, and 
is also engaged much of the time upon the work of construction. 

At the beginning of the year the engineering force, including 
both those engaged upon the construction and maintenance of the 
works, numbered 158, and at the end of the year 196 ; and during 
the year fluctuated from a minimum of 155, in February, to a maxi- 
mum of 236, in August. 

In addition to the engineering force, which included the engineers 
engaged upon the inspection of the work, other inspectors have been 
employed upon masonry, earthwork and pipe laying. The maxi- 
mum number so employed at any one time during the year was 27. 

Gangs of men, under the immediate direction of foremen and 
under the general direction of the engineers, have been employed 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 



81 



from time to time to do minor work, the more important items of 
which were digging a narrow channel in the bed of the Nashua 
River below the Lancaster Mills, making improvements at Lake 
Cochituate, and laying Venturi meters and raising pipes in the 
Metropolitan Water District. 

There has also been a maintenance force, averaging 179, em- 
ployed at the pumping stations and in connection with the main- 
tenance of reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, swamp ditches and 
other work. 

Force Employed on Works. 

The force employed upon the works in 1902 was considerably 
larger than the force employed in 1901, owing to the greater 
amount of contract work. 

The largest force employed upon the works at any one time dur- 
ing the year was for the week ending August 2, as follows : — 



Men. 



Contractors' force : — 

Reservoir Department, 

Dam and Aqueduct Department, 

Sudbury Department 

Weston Aqueduct Department, 

Distribution Department 

Day-labor force, construction, . 

Engineering force, including engineer inspectors and those engaged upon 

maintenance, 

Inspectors not engineers, 

Maintenance force, not including civil engineers 



4,450 



Horses. 



1,167 


156 




691 


63 




159 


36 




1,334 


252 




543 
..... 3 gQi 


59 


566 

8 


108 




229 




. 


23 




- 


196 




- 



574 



Arrangement of Report. 
In continuing this report, it is the purpose to separate the work 
charged to the construction account from that charged to the main- 
tenance account ; but, as the work of construction and maintenance 
is supervised by the same principal engineers, and in very many 
cases the assistants are engaged upon both classes of work, it is not 
feasible to make a complete separation. 



82 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CONSTRUCTION. 

Contracts. 
A detailed statement of the contracts made and pending during 
the year is given in Appendix No. 1. The following statement 
gives a summary of all the contracts charged to construction from 
the beginning of the work to the end of 1902 : — 



PORTION OF WOKK. 



Number of 
Contracts. 



Approximate 
Amount. 



Wachusett Reservoir, 

Wachusett Dam, 

Relocation Central Massachusetts Railroad, . 

Wachusett Aqueduct and Clinton sewerage, . 

Sudbury Reservoir, the portions of contracts not per- 
formed at the time they were assumed from the city 
of Boston, 

Sudbury Department, reservoir, filter-beds, pipe lines 
and improvement of Lake Cochituate, Metropolitan 
Water Works contracts, 

Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir, 

Distribution Department, including pipes, valves and 
special castings purchased for other departments, 



Totals, 



26 
4 
5 

19 

11 

22 

23 

156 



266 



^2,548,297 86 

1,634,263 78 

454,388 35 

1,516,259 67 

583,220 54 

956,508 17 

2,061,994 45 

4,462,457 91 



$14,217,390 73 



Number of contracts made in 1902, . . 37 

Number of contracts completed in 1902, 26 

Total number of contracts made to December 31, 1902, 266 

Amount of contracts made and assumed in 1896, including only the 
portions of contracts assumed from the city of Boston, performed 

under the direction of the Board, $3,893,934 31 

Amount of contracts made in 1897, 1,271,960 64 

Amount of contracts made in 1898, 743,748 75 



Amount carried forward, $5,909,643 70 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



83 



Amount brought forward, 



Amount of contracts made in 1899 (approximate), . 
Amount of contracts made in 1900 (approximate), . 
Amount of contracts made in 1901 (approximate), . 
Amount of contracts made in 1902 (approximate), . 



$5,909,643 70 

2,291,614 62 
1,751,176 10 
2,794,142 95 
1,470,813 36 

$14,217,390 73 



Amount of contracts completed to December 31, 1901, . . . $7,654,798 39 
Amount of contracts completed in 1902, 734,985 16 

18,389,783 55 
Amount of 35 contracts unfinished December 31, 1902 (approxi- 
mate) 6,339,607 18 

$14,729,390 73 
Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by city 

of Boston, 512,000 00 

$14,217,390 73 

Value of work done by contract to December 31, 1896, . . . $2,061,910 38 
Value of work done by contract from January 1, 1897, to December' 

31, 1897, 2,647,063 53 

Value of work done by contract from January 1, 1898, to December 

31, 1898, 703,141 71 

Value of work done by contract from January 1, 1899, to December 

31, 1899, 1,206,791 72 

Value of work done by contract from January 1, 1900, to December 

31, 1900, 927,034 80 

Value of work done by contract from January 1, 1901, to December 

31, 1901, 1,067,540 70 

Value of work done by contract from January 1, 1902, to December 

31, 1902 2,940,261 46 

$11,553,744 30 
Value of work remaining to be done on 35 unfinished contracts 

December 31, 1902 (approximate), 2,663,646 43 



$14,217,390 73 



In the case of all contracts completed up to the present time final 
settlements have been made without any legal controversy, and there 
have been no strikes of employes which went beyond an incipient 
stage or lasted more than two or three days. 



84 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



RESEKVOIR DEPARTMENT. 

Hiram A. Miller, Department Engineer. 

The organization of the engineering force has been substantially 
the same as during the previous year. Charles E. Wells, division 
engineer, has continued in charge of the inspection of the removal 
of soil from the Wachusett Reservoir and the supervision of the 
contractors engaged on that work. Charles A. Bowman, division 
engineer, has continued in charge of the force reports, measure- 
ments, estimates and miscellaneous engineering work connected 
with the removal of soil, and of divers small amounts of engineering 
work of a general character. Harry J. Morrison, division engineer, 
has continued in charge of the work at the North Dike, and has 
been placed in charge of the construction of the relocation of the 
Central Massachusetts Railroad, from a point a shorty distance east 
of the North Dike to the connections with the Worcester, Nashua 
& Portland Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad. Moses J. 
Look, assistant engineer, had charge of the work connected with 
the relocation of roads and railroads at West Boylston and Oakdale 
until April 12, when the work was divided, Mr. Look being assigned 
to the work at Oakdale, and Ernest H. Baldwin, assistant engineer, 
being placed in charge of the work at West Boylston. On May 15 
Mr. Look was transferred to the Dam and Aqueduct Department, 
Mr. Baldwin being placed in charge of the work at Oakdale, and 
Arthur W. Tidd, assistant engineer, in charge of the work at West 
Boylston. All of the above engineers reported directly to the 
department engineer. 

The total engineering force in this department has varied from 
47 to 72. 

The main office of this department is in Clinton. Four branch 
offices, one near the North Dike in Clinton, one at Sawyer's Mills 
in Boylston and two in West Boylston, have been continued through- 
out the year, and another has been established in Oakdale. 



North Dike. 
Work upon the North Dike has been in progress during the year 
under the contractors, Nawn & Brock, Long & Little and the 
Newell & Snowling Construction Company. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



85 



The work done by each will be described more fully under the 
head of Contracts. The total amount of work done during the year, 
with the total amount to date, is given in the following table : — 



To December 
31, 1901. 



For the Year 
1902. 



Total to 

December 

31, 1902. 



Soil and earth excavated from main cut-off trench (cubic 
yards) 

Soil and earth excavated from secondary cut-off trench 
(cubic yards), 

Sheet piling driven (linear feet), 

Surface of rock uncovered and treated at bottom of main 
cut-off trench (square feet), 

Soil from reservoir deposited in cut-off trenches and in the 
dike (cubic yards) 

Barth and gravel taken from borrow pits and deposited in 
the dike (cubic yards), 

Earth excavation for the construction of a small dike in 
Coachlace Pond (cubic yards), 

Drain pipe laid at the toe of the westerly portion of the 
dike (linear feet), 

Screened gravel on the water slope of the easterly portion 
of the dike as a foundation for riprap (cubic yards), 



499,856 



499,856 



42,033 


- 


42,033 


5,245 


- 


5,245 


77,250 


- 


77,250 


3,418,839 


1,089,627 


4,508,466 


98,355 


90,779 


189,134 


19,172 


- 


19,172 


7,083 


- 


7,083 


. 


4,435 


4,435 



The present condition of the dike, relative to its completion, is as 
follows : — 

At the beginning of 1902 the excavation of the main and second- 
ary cut-off trenches, the filling with soil of the secondary cut-off 
trench and the driving of the sheet piling had been completed, and 
the filling of the main cut-off trench had been substantially com- 
pleted. The work of rolling soil in 6-inch layers above the main 
cut-off trench and of depositing soil in 7%-foot layers has continued 
throughout the year and is completed. Of the soil filling, which 
constitutes the principal part of the dike, 4,508,466 cubic yards have 
been deposited, which is 91 per cent, of the total amount required, 
as at present estimated. All the soil required, except about 2,000 
cubic yards, has been deposited in the easterly portion of the dike 
and all in the northeasterly 2,400 feet of the westerly portion. 

Work has continued on the embankment of earth and gravel on 
the water slope of the dike. 

The depositing of screened gravel as a foundation for the riprap on 
the easterly portion of the dike was commenced on May 30 and con- 
tinued throughout the year. 



86 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The depositing of riprap on the easterly portion of the dike has 
been completed for 1,320 feet from its easterly end. 

A day-labor force was engaged most of the time during the first 
half of the year in consolidating the soil in the dike by saturating it 
with water, continuing the work which was in progress at the end of 
the previous year. Water was pumped day and night from Sandy 
Pond upon the easterly portion of the dike, from the beginning of the 
year until March 22, and from May 19 until June 30. Special care 
was taken during the first period of pumping to saturate the soil 
rolled in 6-inch layers, and the embankment to the extent of 4% acres 
was flooded for about twelve weeks. This required the construction 
of about 6,050 linear feet of small dikes, from 1 to 6 feet in height, 
forming small basins into which the water could be pumped. Dur- 
ing the second period of pumping the water was used entirely on the 
northerly slope of the dike. The amount of water pumped upon the 
easterly portion of the dike was approximately 68,000,000 gallons. 
Water was pumped upon the westerly portion of the dike during the 
day time from February 24 to May 19, except when the pump was 
out of service for needed repairs. 

Measurements made to determine the extent to which the soil was 
consolidated by the saturation indicated that it had already been so 
well consolidated that the saturation did not have any large effect. 
On the portions of the embankment where the soil had been rolled 
in 6-inch layers and it had an average depth of 51 feet, the settle- 
ment, as shown by measurements at 22 points, ranged from 0.06 to 
0.26 of a foot, and averaged 0.15 of a foot. On the portions of the 
embankment where the material had been deposited in 7%-foot layers 
without rolling and it had an average depth of 40 feet, the maxi- 
mum settlement, as shown by measurements at 186 points, was 1 
foot, and the average settlement 0.47 of a foot. 

A day-labor force was also employed in opening a quarry a short 
distance east of the easterly end of the dike, in order to determine 
the suitability of the rock for use in slope paving on the water slope 
of the dike ; but the decision to build the relocation of the railroad 
through the same ledge rendered further investigation unnecessary. 

Other day -labor work at the North Dike consisted of constructing 
a wooden box culvert under the temporary road near the northerly 
toe of the dike, a cart road around the end of the easterly portion 
of the dike, and gages at Sandy and Coachlace ponds ; digging test 



L 




- V 



W4 
W§Wk 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 87 

pits and drainage ditches ; sowing grass seed and rye on the finished 
portion of the dike, and mowing and burning weeds. 

The maximum day-labor force employed at the dike was 42 men 
and 8 horses, for the week ending January 11. 

Relocation and Construction of Roads. 

Considerable progress has been made on surveys and studies for 
the relocation of roads at the upper end of the reservoir, to take the 
place of those discontinued. 

A determination of changes in the grade of the road from Clinton 
to West Boylston, on and in the vicinity of the North Dike, and for 
the relocation of a small portion of the South Meadow Road, both 
made necessary by the relocation of the Central Massachusetts Rail- 
road, was made by the Board and agreed to by the County Commis- 
sioners of Worcester County on July 22. 

Nawn & Brock, under their contract for the relocation of the 
railroad, constructed the new highway across the dike and made 
the necessary changes in the existing highway where it is to pass 
under the railroad bridge, and also constructed the short piece of the 
relocated South Meadow Road. Work was commenced on August 
23, and the highways were nearly completed at the end of the year, 
1,660 feet having been completed and accepted. 

Meskill Brothers & Leahy constructed a portion of the road 
located last year across the reservoir in West Boylston, connecting 
Worcester Street on the southerly side and Sterling and Lancaster 
streets on the northerly side. On the southerly side of the reservoir 
they constructed 1,173 feet of the main road, also a connection 214 
feet in length, between the main road and Prospect Street, near the 
South Boylston station. On the northerly side they constructed 
1,125 feet of road-bed along Howe and Fletcher streets, also the 
proposed ^extension toward Oakdale for 431 feet, making a total of 
2,943 feet of road-bed made ready for the broken stone surfacing. 

A second and much more extensive slip of the soil used for dress- 
ing the slopes of the Boylston Street embankment in Clinton, be- 
tween Oak and Wilson streets, occurred during the heavy rain of 
December 15, 1901, which made it desirable to extend the system 
of drainage built in 1901 in a portion of this embankment, so as to 
include not only the additional places where the soil had slipped, 
but also all of the higher portions of the embankment where the soil 



88 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

had not slipped. The drainage of the embankment was accomplished 
by digging trenches in the clayey material and filling them with 
stones, and a foot of coarse sand or gravel was placed over the 
clayey material where the soil slipped, before replacing the soil 
upon the surface. In addition to this drainage of the slopes, a drain 
consisting of a 5-inch sewer pipe covered with screened gravel was 
laid on the westerly side of Boylston Street, from Oak Street, for 
the greater portion of the distance to Wilson Street, to intercept 
the water draining through the broken-stone surfacing of this street, 
and divert it through drains to the river. A drain of the same 
kind was also laid on the easterly side of River Street at the foot of 
the slope. A guard fence was rebuilt where it had been displaced, 
the slopes were re-seeded and the grass was cut. 

The extent of this work, which was all performed by the day-labor 
forces, is indicated by the following statement : — 

Slopes resurfaced (square feet) , 16,000 

5-inch sewer pipe drain constructed (linear feet), 2,370 

Stone drains constructed on slopes (linear feet), 3,440 

On land of Thomas Mackesy 148 feet of 24-inch sewer pipe were 
laid, to conduct the water from the end of the culvert at the highway 
through his field to the stock pond. 

So far as necessary, the discontinued highways through the reser- 
voir have been kept in a condition to render them reasonably safe 
for travel. Some of the repairs necessary have been made by the 
contractors and some by the day-labor forces of the Board. 

Much other minor work has been done by the day-labor forces, such 
as the replanking of bridges, repairs to paving connected with the 
road culverts where in or near the reservoir, the sowing of grass 
seed on the slopes of embankments, digging of test pits and making 
of wash-drill borings at the sites of proposed road bridges across 
the rivers, and the setting of stone bounds on the road locations. 

The maximum day-labor force employed in connection with the 
work upon the roads was 44 men and 10 horses, for the week ending 
May 10. 

Considerable work has been done by the engineers in making 
plans and specifications for the location and construction of new 
roads towards the upper end of the reservoir and at the North Dike, 
and for the discontinuance of roads at West Boylston village and at 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 89 

Oakdale. A plan for submission to the County Commissioners of 
the proposed relocation of the roads on the northerly side of the 
reservoir, from West Boylston village to Oakdale, and through 
Oakdale to Holden and Newton streets, has been made. 

Removal of Soil. 

Work upon the removal of soil from the reservoir has been in 
progress during the year under the contractors, Nawn & Brock, 
Long & Little, 'Mes kill Brothers & Leahy, and George M. Atkins & 
Co. An additional contract with Bruno, Salomone & Petitti was 
made toward the end of the year for the removal of nearly all the 
soil in the upper portion of the reservoir not included in previous 
contracts. More detailed information in regard to each contract 
will be found under the head of Contracts. 

The total amount of soil removed and to be removed from the 
Wachusett Reservoir is at present estimated to be about 6,900,000 
cubic yards, from approximately 4,200 acres. Of this, the total 
amount removed from the reservoir in previous years was 3,588,648 
cubic yards, from 2,116 acres ; in 1902, 1,246,931 cubic yards were 
removed from 715 acres, — making a total from the beginning of 
the work to the end of 1902 of 4,835,579 cubic yards, or 70 per 
eent. of the total as at present estimated, removed from 2,831 acres. 

The existing contracts provide for the removal of substantially 
all soil except a comparatively small quantity in and along the 
margins of the Oakdale mill-pond at the extreme upper end of the 
reservoir, and a somewhat larger quantity in the easterly portion of 
the reservoir which is to be used in connection with the construction 
of the South Dike. 

Of the soil removed to the end of 1902, 172,879 cubic yards 
were used for road embankments, 17,720 cubic yards for shallow- 
no wage areas, 65,715 cubic yards for railroad embankments, and 
4,508,466 cubic yards for the North Dike. There have been, during 
the year, 33,851 cubic yards of earth used to cover deep muck to 
the depth of about 1 foot; this amount, added to the 49,893 cubic 
yards used for the same purpose during previous years, gives a total 
of 83,744 cubic yards. 

During the year, with the exception of a small portion which has 
been loaded into dump carts and hauled directly to the dike, the soil 
excavated and deposited in the dike has been loaded into cars, or 



90 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

first loaded into carts and then dumped into cars at the dumping 
platforms. The soil has been hauled to the dike by locomotives 
over the line of double track which passes by the South Clinton 
station to the easterly portion of the dike, over a single track line 
of railway along Cunningham's Brook, entering the westerly portion 
of the dike near its centre, and over another single track line enter- 
ing the westerly portion of the dike at the westerly end. A large 
portion of the soil hauled into the westerly portion of the dike on 
the railway entering the dike at the westerly end was loaded into 
cars on the intervale above Sawyer's Mills, and hoisted to the top 
of the bluff by an incline in that locality. 

The plant employed on soil removal, exclusive of carts, included 
30.7 miles of 3-foot-gage track, 22 10 to 16 ton locomotives, 700 
21/2 to 3% cubic yard dump cars, and 1 70 horse-power hoisting 
engine. 

The soil deposited in the road embankment at West Boylston 
village and in the railroad and shallow-flowage embankments at 
Oakdale has been hauled in wagons and carts. 

A day-labor force under the direction of the engineering force 
performed the following work : — 

The wood and brush were cleared from about 210 acres of the 
upper end of the reservoir site, including a strip 50 feet wide along 
the shore. The dam formerly belonging to the West Boylston 
Manufacturing Company on the Stillwater River was torn down, to 
lower the water and reduce the current through the head-gates, 
which collapsed during the spring floods. The telephone line was 
extended from West Boylston to Oakdale. Considerable work was 
done tearing down and clearing up around the mill formerly belong- 
ing to the West Boylston Manufacturing Company. The logs from 
the upper end of the reservoir, containing approximately 325,000 
to 350,000 feet of lumber, were sawed. The gates and dam at the 
Clarendon Mills have also been cared for, and ditches and water 
courses through the margins of the reservoir have been maintained. 
The small trees and shrubs which have sprung up on the area from 
which soil has been removed have been pulled or grubbed, and the 
brush has been mowed on the 50-foot strip along the shore of the 
reservoir, where it had previously been cleared. 

In addition to the engineering work connected with the estimates 
and inspection of the removal of soil, the following work has been 
done : — 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 

For the guidance of the inspectors, the organic matter in 554 
samples of soil has been determined. A new channel for Muddy 
Brook, 1.3 miles in length, along one side of the deep muck which 
it is proposed to cover, has been located. The limit along the mar- 
gin of the reservoir of the area from which soil is to be removed has 
been staked out for 4.7 miles. Preliminary estimates of quantities 
and cost, plans, specifications and one of the contract drawings were 
made for Contract No. 257. Topographical surveys and plans have 
been made of 69 acres of shallow-flowage and steep slopes along the 
margins of the reservoir, and cross-sections have been taken and 
plotted. The proper treatment of the shallow-flowage areas and 
steep slopes has been studied. There have been 150 construction 
benches established. 

Relocation of Railroads. 

Under the agreement made between the Board and the Boston & 
Maine Railroad on April 3, 1902, the line for the relocation of the 
Central Massachusetts Railroad around the reservoir was definitely 
determined. 

The new location leaves the present location at the bridge over the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad in West Berlin and 
swings to the north, running in a fairly direct line to a crossing over 
the South Branch of the Nashua River about 800 feet below the 
Wachusett Dam. After crossing the river the line curves and passes 
close to the northerly end of the dam, and along the margin of the 
reservoir to the easterly end of the North Dike ; thence it follows 
along the dike a short distance below its crest, and curves to a junc- 
tion with the Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad about half a mile beyond the dike. The length of 
the new line to this junction is 3.92 miles. From the junction, for 
a distance of about 4.40 miles, to a point about half a mile north of 
the present crossings of the railroads at Oakdale, the double tracks 
of the Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division are to be utilized, and 
no new construction is required ; but at Oakdale it is necessary not 
only to lay new tracks to connect with the Central Massachusetts 
Railroad, but also to change the location of the tracks of the Worces- 
ter, Nashua & Portland Division, in order that a suitable connecting 
curve may be made between the two railroads. These changes, 
together with the flowage of some of the railroad lands at Oakdale, 
require a relocation of freight tracks, freight and passenger stations 



92 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and other appurtenances of the railroad at this place. The length 
of the relocation in Oakdale from the most northerly point to the 
junction with the existing tracks of the Central Massachusetts Rail- 
road is 0.55 of a mile. The total length of the new route is 8.87 
miles, only one-third of a mile longer than the existing route through 
the reservoir. 

In addition to the main track, a branch track, commonly known 
as the Y, is provided, leaving the main track near the easterly end 
of the dike and curving to a junction with the Worcester, Nashua & 
Portland Division north of the dike, so that outward trains from 
Boston can be run directly to the station at Clinton. The length of 
this Y branch, which is located most of the way on the outer slope 
of the dike, is about four-fifths of a mile. 

In order to carry the railroad past the reservoir without making a 
long detour, it was necessary to locate it where there would be un- 
usual difficulties in construction. In a length of 1 mile near the 
dam there are required a tunnel 1,110 feet long ; a viaduct 917 feet 
long for crossing the valley of the river, with a maximum height of 
133 feet; and 1,500 linear feet of rock cut, having a maximum 
depth on centre line of 56 feet. 

In order to avoid grade crossings, the railroad is to be carried 
over a road in Berlin and another in Clinton on steel bridges, and 
similar bridges are to be built to carry two roads over the railroads 
at Oakdale. An end span of the viaduct also crosses another road 
in Clinton. 

The highway which runs along the North Dike has been raised to 
pass over the Y track, and it is the intention to use a wooden bridge 
for the highway at this place for the present, as it is located on filled 
ground, which will not permit the use of masonry and steel. 

The agreement with the Boston & Maine Railroad provides that 
the work of constructing the relocation of the railroad shall be done 
by and at the expense of the Board, and the Board is also to do the 
grading incidental to the construction of the Y branch, but is to be 
reimbursed for the expense of this work by the Railroad. The Rail- 
road has made the designs and inspected the material for the bridges 
and will inspect their erection. Arrangements have been made with 
the Railroad to furnish the materials for and build the tracks. 

Delay in completing the negotiations for the relocation of the rail- 
road rendered it imperative that the work of construction should be 




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JANUARY, 1903. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

carried on vigorously, in order not to delay the storage of some 
water in the reservoir for the maintenance of the supply to the Met- 
ropolitan Water District. Plans were therefore completed and the 
work placed under contract at the earliest possible moment. 

For construction purposes the work was divided into four sections, 
the first three covering the portion from West Berlin to the junctions 
with the Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division, and the fourth 
including all the work at Oakdale. 

Sections 2 and 3 were very intimately connected with the work 
at the dam and dike, respectively ; and on this account, and because 
of the facilities which the contractors for these works had for starting 
upon the work promptly and prosecuting it rapidly, arrangements 
were made with the McArthur Brothers Company for constructing 
Section 2, and with Nawn & Brock for constructing Section 3. 

The contract with the McArthur Brothers Company, which cov- 
ered a large amount of work, was dated April 18, 1902, and required 
the completion of the work within one year from the date of the 
contract. The other contracts, including the contract for the steel 
viaduct and bridges, were made as soon afterward as possible, and 
all of them are by their terms to be completed on or before April 1, 
1903, or at an earlier date. 

Sections 1 and 2 were placed in charge of the engineer of the 
Dam and Aqueduct Department, and sections 3 and 4 in charge of 
the engineer of the Reservoir Department, as this division gave 
each the work within the territory under his charge. A further 
report of the work done upon sections 1 and 2 will be included 
subsequently, in connection with the work performed by the Dam 
and Aqueduct Department. The details of the contract work done 
in the Reservoir Department on sections 3 and 4 will be found 
under the head of Contracts. 

Day-labor forces have performed the following work in connection 
with the relocation of railroads : — 

The foundations of the abutments of the arch over the Quinepoxet 
River, which had been nearly undermined by the current of water, 
were grouted, and further undermining was prevented by paving 
under and below the arch ; this work required 68 barrels of Portland 
cement, 626 cubic yards of paving and 5,000 feet B.M. of spruce 
sheeting. The covered channel formerly used by the West Boylston 
Manufacturing Company to divert the water from the Quinepoxet 



94 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

River into the Oakdale mill-pond was partially filled. The slope of 
the railroad embankment near the site of the West Boylston Manu- 
facturing Company's dam across the Quinepoxet River has been 
riprapped. 

The maximum day-labor force employed was 21 men and 7 horses, 
for the week ending September 13. 

In addition to the engineering connected with the execution of 
the work, the engineers have prepared specifications and contract 
plans for the relocation of the railroad in the vicinity of the North 
Dike and at Oakdale. Plans and estimates were made for repairing 
and improving the wing walls of the arch bridges on the Worcester, 
Nashua & Portland Division over the Stillwater and Quinepoxet 
rivers. A plan was made of property at Oakdale to be deeded from 
the Commonwealth to the Railroad, and of other property to be 
deeded from the Railroad to the Commonwealth, on account of the 
change in the location of the railroads. 

CONTRACTS, WACHUSETT RESERVOIR. 

Contract 166, Nawn & Brock. 

Excavating Soil from Section 6 of the Wachusett Reservoir, and building the 
Easterly Portion of the North Dike in Boylston, Clinton and. West Boylston. 

On June 13, 1899, a contract was made with Nawn & Brock for 
the completion of the easterly portion of the North Dike, with the 
exception of the slope paving or riprap. The material for this pur- 
pose, with the exception of comparatively small amounts of sand 
and gravel, was to be obtained by removing the soil from some 
1,700 acres, known as Section 6 of the Wachusett Reservoir. 

The contractors have prosecuted their work during the year in 
substantially the same manner as formerly, hauling the soil from all 
areas up their double-track railway to the dike. On the intervale 
and other low and comparatively level areas, where it has been 
practicable to do so, the contractors have loaded the soil directly 
into cars, throwing the track as the work progressed. On other 
portions of the work, where this method was impracticable, it was 
hauled in carts to dumping platforms and there dumped into cars. 
The soil has been deposited in the easterly portion of the dike. 

The total number of carloads hauled during the year has been 
190,558, amounting to 702,745 cubic yards; this, with the 665,058 
carloads hauled during previous years, amounting to 2,181,647 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



95 



cubic yards, makes a total of 855,616 carloads, amounting to 
2,884,392 cubic yards. 

Earth, consisting of either sand or gravel, has been deposited as 
needed to construct an embankment on the water side of the dike, 
with a thick gravel facing on the water slope. There have been 
19,422 cubic yards of earth and 23,220 cubic yards of gravel used 
for this purpose during the year, which, added to the 45,250 cubic 
yards of earth and 1,136 cubic yards of gravel used in previous 
years, make totals at the end of the year of 64,672 and 24,356 cubic 
yards, respectively. 

There have been 6,611 cubic yards of sand or gravel deposited 
as a covering over muck which was so deep that it was deemed in- 
advisable to excavate it; this amount, added to the 1,742 cubic 
yards used for a similar purpose in previous years, makes a total of 
8,353 cubic yards. 

The plant used by the contractors included 14 10 to 16 ton loco- 
motives, 500 3% cubic yard dump cars and 22.3 miles of 3-foot- 
gage track. 

The total amount of work done under this contract has been : — 





To December 
31, 1901. 


In 1902. 


Total. 




623 

2,206,653 

47,120 

1,136 


296.6 

702,745 

26,033 

23,220 


919.6 

2,909,398 

73,153 

24,356 



While the work at the North Dike is substantially completed, a 
considerable amount of work remains on Section 6, consisting of 
covering deep muck, grubbing stumps and roots and clearing up. 

The maximum force employed was 707 men and 56 horses, for the 
week ending April 26. 



Contract 183, Long & Little. 

Excavating Soil from Section 7 of the Wachusett Reservoir, and building a Part 
of the Westerly Portion of the North Dike in Clinton and Boylston. 

This contract was made on December 12, 1899, and called for the 

excavation of soil from about 313 acres of the Wachusett Reservoir 

site, known as Section 7, embracing the intervale north of the Cen- 



96 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



tral Massachusetts Railroad, the steep slopes on the northerly side 
of the intervale between South Clinton and Sawyer's Mills, the 
intervale and slopes on both sides of Cunningham's Brook, and a 
portion of the Catholic Cemetery in Clinton. The contract also 
provided for the completion, with the exception of the slope paving, 
of the northeasterly 2,400 feet of the westerly portion of the North 
Dike, the completion of the main embankment of sand and gravel, 
and the partial construction of the soil embankment for an additional 
1,700 feet. 

The plant employed, exclusive of horses and carts, has been 4 
12 to 15 ton locomotives, 100 2% yard dump cars and 3.5 miles of 
3-foot-gage track. 

During the year the soil has been removed by a car plant, no 
material being transported to the dike entirely by carts. Only one 
dumping platform has been used. Carts have been used to a con- 
siderable extent to dump material excavated from the slopes along 
the sides of the track, to be subsequently loaded into cars. On the 
steep slopes south of Sandy Pond wooden chutes or troughs lined 
with sheet iron were used, the laborers shovelling the soil directly 
into the chutes, where it would slide to the track at the bottom of 
the slope. 

During the year 40,775 carloads of soil have been removed, con- 
taining 116,029 cubic yards; during the previous years, 137,829 
carloads, containing 382,130 cubic yards, — making a total at the 
end of 1902 of 178,604 carloads, containing 498,159 cubic yards 
of soil. 

There have been 849 cubic yards of sand or gravel used to cover 
deep muck during the year, and 30,410 cubic yards in previous 
years, making a total at the end of 1902 of 31,259 cubic yards. 
The gravel used for facing the dike was excavated from a pit between 
Sandy Pond and the cemetery. 

The total amount of work done under this contract has been : — 



To December 
31, 1901. 



In 1902. 



Total. 



Clearing and grubbing (acres), 
Soil excavation (cubic yards), 
Earth excavation (cubic yards), 
Gravel excavation (cubic yards), 



136 

479,943 

30,574 

27,585 



42.81 

116,029 

849 

13,450 



178.81 

595,972 

31,423 

41,035 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 97 

The value of the work done, as shown by the final estimate, was 
$220,003.15. 

The maximum force employed was 227 men and 16 horses, for the 
week ending April 26. 

The contractors completed the work on September 11, 1902, 
although the contract did not require its completion until July 1, 
1903. 

Contract 210, JTeit'ell & Snowline) Construction Company. 

Excavating Soil from Section 8 of the Wachusett Reservoir, and building a Part of 
the Westerly Portion of the North Dike in Clinton and Sterling. 

On August 1, 1901, a contract was made with the Newell & 
Snowling Construction Company for removing soil from Section 8 
to the westerly portion of the North Dike. This contract called for 
the removal of a sufficient amount of soil to complete the westerly 
portion of the dike, estimated at 935,000 cubic yards. The area 
from which the soil was to be removed embraced about 550 acres, 
of which 410 acres required clearing and grubbing, and included all 
the territory north of the river below Sawyer's Mills, not included 
in previous contracts, and a considerable tract at and above Sawyer's 
Mills north of the Central Massachusetts Railroad. The contract 
also provided for the excavation of about 77,000 cubic yards of 
earth and gravel for the completion of the embankment along the 
water slope of the dike, and for covering deep muck which it was 
not considered desirable to remove. 

The material nearest the dike is hauled to the dike in carts, and 
that from greater distances in cars. During the early part of the 
season the material removed in cars was taken from the intervale 
and steep slopes above Sawyer's Mills, that on the intervale being 
loaded directly into cars, and that from the slopes in some cases 
being shovelled down the slopes and loaded into cars, and in other 
cases hauled in carts to dumping platforms. The cars were trans- 
ported by a locomotive to the foot of an incline having a grade of 
10 per cent, near the West Boylston Road, above Sawyer's Mills, 
thence hauled up the incline by the use of a stationary engine, and 
from the top of the incline transported to the dike by locomotives. 
During the latter part of the season the car plant was employed in a 
similar manner on the high ground between Sawyer's Mills and the 
North Dike, the incline and stationary engine being temporarily 
abandoned. 



98 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



By the operation of the railway and car plant, 92,822 carloads, 
containing 321,504 cubic yards of soil, were transported to the dike ; 
this, added to the 15,830 carloads, containing 51,747 cubic yards, 
transported in the previous year, makes a total of 108,652 carloads, 
containing 373,251 cubic yards. 

The plant consists of 4 12-ton locomotives, 100 3 cubic yard dump 
cars, 1 70 horse-power hoisting engine and 4.9 miles of 3-foot-gage 
track. 

The total amount of work done under this contract has been : — 



To December 
31, 1901. 



In 1902. 



Total. 



Clearing and grubbing (acres) 

Soil excavation (cubic yards) 

Earth excavation for embankment at dike (cubic yards), 
Earth excavation for covering muck (cubic yards), 



54 

100,553 

10,600 





168.2 

341,652 

2,772 

36,991 



222.2 

442,205 

13,372 

36,991 



The amount of work done at the end of the year was considerably 
in excess of the requirements of the contract. 

The maximum force employed was 303 men and 48 horses for the 



week ending May 3. 



Contract 229, Meskill Brothers & Leahy. 

Excavating Soil from Wachusett Reservoir, and building a Part of Worcester 

Street in West Boylston. 

On April 4, 1902, a contract was made with Meskill Brothers & 
Leahy for the construction of portions of the relocation of the high- 
way in West Boylston, from Worcester Street on the southerly side 
of the reservoir to the junction of Sterling and Lancaster streets on 
the northerly side of the reservoir, not included within the limits of 
the reservoir. 

Work under this contract was commenced April 14, 1902. The 
maximum force employed was 47 men and 20 horses, for the week 
endino" May 17 ; and the contractors completed their work on August 
25, 1902, except a small amount of grading and drains under the 
Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad. This work could not be done, because the railroad com- 
pany, which was building the overgrade bridge at this place, had 
not completed its work and removed the piling from the road-bed. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 99 

The principal quantities of work performed were as follows : — 

Earth excavation (cubic yards), 26,228 

Dry paving (cubic yards), 60 

Masonry (cubic yards), 166 

5-inch side drains (linear feet), 1,936 

Cast-iron and sewer pipe culverts, 12 to 15 inches in diameter (linear feet), 214 

Rock excavation (cubic yards) , 274 

The amount of the final estimate was $9,263.95. 

Of the earth excavation given above, 5,490 cubic yards was soil 
removed from the Wachusett Reservoir, a large portion of which 
was used for dressing the slopes of embankments. 

Contract 246, JSfavm & Brock. 

Section 3 of the Eelocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad in Clinton. 

On May 6, 1902, a contract was made with Nawn & Brock for the 
construction of the portion of the relocation of the Central Massa- 
chusetts Railroad extending from a point approximately 700 feet 
east of the easterly end of the North Dike to junctions with the 
Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division at two points ; the main 
line running westerly and joining the Worcester, Nashua & Portland 
Division about half a mile southwest of the South Meadow Road in 
Clinton, the other line (known as the Y) turning easterly toward 
Clinton and joining the same division near the southwesterly shore 
of Coachlace Pond. The contract also covered the construction or 
reconstruction of the Clinton-West Boylston Road, from a point a 
short distance west of South Main Street to a point a short distance 
west of the South Meadow Road, the construction of the relocation 
of the South Meadow Road, and the placing of screened gravel or 
broken stone on the water slope of the dike and of the railroad 
embankment east of the dike, to serve as a foundation for riprap. 
As a part of the construction of the railroad, the contractors were 
required to build stone and concrete masonry abutments for a steel 
bridge over the Clinton-West Boylston Road. As far as prac- 
ticable, the soil excavated from the reservoir under their other con- 
tract was to be used in making the railroad and road embankments, 
except where other material was available from the railroad and 
road excavations. The extreme westerly portion of the line was 
so situated that it was better to borrow earth from the vicinity to 
make the embankments. The gravel needed for surfacing the roads, 



100 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

ballasting the railroad and protecting the water slopes of the railroad 
embankment was also obtained from borrow pits. 

The principal quantities of work performed under the contract are 
approximately as follows : — 

Earth excavation (cubic yards), 22,100 

Rock excavation (cubic yards), 310 

Soil taken from Section 6, measured in embankment (cubic yards), . 53,100 
Gravel for the water slope of the embankment east of the dike, for bal- 
last on the railroad and for surfacing the roads (cubic yards), . . 7,500 

Screened gravel in place (cubic yards), 4,934 

Concrete and stone masonry (cubic yards), 434 

Cast-iron pipe in culverts (tons of 2,000 pounds), 20 

The work on the roads, on the Y and on all of the main line of 
the railroad, except the extreme westerly portion, is substantially 
completed. 

The maximum force employed was 116 men and 16 horses, for the 
week ending October 25. 

Contract 247, George M. Atkins & Co. 
Section 4 of the Relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad in West Boylston. 

On June 5, 1902, a contract was made with George M. Atkins & 
Co. for the work connected with the relocation of the railroads in and 
near the village of Oakdale, embracing a change in the location 
of the Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division, connecting curves 
between the two railroads, and slope paving along the railroad em- 
bankments where they will be flooded. 

The material for the embankments, when not obtained from the 
railroad excavations, was to be obtained by taking the soil from that 
portion of the Wachusett Reservoir lying between the two railroads 
on the north and west and the Quinepoxet and Stillwater rivers on 
the south and east, also the soil in and around the Oakdale mill-pond 
north of the Central Massachusetts Railroad, and on both sides of 
the Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division. 

The preliminary estimates called for 130,000 cubic yards of earth 
excavation, 5,700 cubic yards of riprap and slope paving, 25 cubic 
yard-c^f masonry and 325 linear feet of cast-iron and sewer pipe 
drains and culverts from 6 to 18 inches in diameter. 

The contractor commenced work on June 11, 1902, and has accom- 
plished all that can be economically done until changes are made in 
the location of the railroad tracks. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 101 

The total amount of work done has been : — 

Earth excavation (cubic yards) , 100,654 

Riprap and slope paving (cubic yards), 3,217 

Masonry (cubic yards), 5 

Cast-iron pipe culverts (linear feet), 70 

The maximum force employed was 129 men and 53 horses, for 
the week ending September 20. 

Contract 257, Bruno, Salomone & Petitti. 
Section 10 of the Wachuseit Reservoir in Boylston and West Boylston. 

On December 27, 1902, a contract was made with Bruno, Salo- 
mone & Petitti for the construction of what is known as Section 10 
of the Wachusett Reservoir. This contract calls for clearing, grub- 
bing and excavating soil from some 700 acres toward the upper end 
of the Wachusett Reservoir. It includes substantially all of the soil- 
stripping westerly from that provided for under the contracts of 
Nawn & Brock and the Newell & Snowling Construction Company 
and southerly from that provided for under the contract of George 
M. Atkins & Co. In addition the contract provides for excavating 
earth and gravel from shallow portions of the reservoir at Oakdale, 
for enlarging a portion of the channel of the Quinepoxet River west 
of the Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division, building a concrete 
dam across the Quinepoxet River at the upper end of this channel, 
excavating gravel to obtain material for protecting the slopes of 
embankments, excavating — chiefly in rock, to a maximum depth of 
about 50 feet — a new channel for the Nashua River at the highway 
crossing the reservoir at West Boylston, and paving the slopes of 
embankments and the bottom and slopes of the new channel of the 
Quinepoxet River. 

The excavated soil and other materials are to be deposited to fill 
a portion of the reservoir at Oakdale which would otherwise be very 
shallow, to build the embankment for a highway across the reservoir 
at West Boylston, and for embankments of other highways across 
and near the reservoir at Oakdale. 

The preliminary estimate calls for clearing and grubbing 100 
acres; excavating 970,000 cubic yards of soil, 135,000 cubic yards 
of earth and 15,000 cubic yards of rock; laying 23,500 cubic yards 
of paving, and building 1,200 cubic yards of concrete masonry. 

As the contract was not made until a few days before the end of 
the year, no work was done under it during the year. 



102 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Improving the Wachusett Watershed. 

The following work has been done at the expense of the Board 
on the Wachusett watershed, partly by a day-labor force and partly 
by the property owners above the flow line, in improving the sani- 
tary conditions near the mills and dwelling houses : — 

At the Dawson mill, in Holden, a cesspool has been constructed 
and drains laid from the closets in the mill to the cesspool, and a 
new privy with a cemented vault has been constructed. At Stewart's 
and Buck Brothers' mills, in East Princeton, and at the residence of 
Ellen H. Fairbanks, in Holden, similar privies have been constructed. 
An 18-inch sewer pipe drain 182 feet long has been laid to take the 
surface water around the cesspool on the land of Andrew J. Scarlett, 
in West Boylston, into the brook below. 

The maximum day-labor force employed was 10 men and 4 horses, 
for the week ending October 11. 

Land Surveys. 

Surveys and plans for the use of the Attorney-General in land 
suits have been made of the Michael O'Malley property in Clinton, 
John F. O'Brien property in Boylston, and of the Glenn Woolen 
Mills, James Dorr proprietor, in Holden. A plan of the George 
H. Holmes property in West Boylston was made for the Convey- 
ancing Department. Surveys and taking plans of the George R. 
Reed and Mary S. Mason properties in West Boylston have been 
made. Ten real estate plans have been revised. 

Real Estate, Care and Disposal. 

Rents have been collected on houses in the possession of the 
Board. Minor repairs have been made on houses to be maintained, 
and a considerable quantity of land products have been sold. A 
fire guard 40 feet wide along the margins of the land purchased by 
the Board has been extended by clearing trees and bushes from an 
additional length of 1.49 miles, making the total length of the fire 
guard at the end of the year 14.98 miles ; of this length 4.59 miles 
have been planted with grass seed during the year. Interior cart 
roads 15 feet wide have been cleared for 6.02 miles, and the brush 
has been mowed on the fire guards and cart roads previously cleared. 
A furrow has been plowed where land purchased by the Board is 
adjacent to railroads. About 20.52 miles of interior cart roads have 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 103 

been sufficiently graded, drained and otherwise improved to make 
passable roads, making a total of 21.52 miles of such roads. Dur- 
ing periods of drought watchmen have patrolled the land to guard 
against fires. The brush along public roads opposite land purchased 
by the Board has been cut and removed. An area of something 
over 175 acres, mostly pasture land, was planted during the spring 
with white pine and sugar maple seedlings, set in rows 5 feet apart 
each way; 74,200 white pine seedlings and 236,500 sugar maple 
seedlings were used ; the white pines were taken from the nurseries, 
and the sugar maple seedlings were obtained from Tolland, Mass. 
A furrow has been plowed around this planted area, 16,178 feet in 
length, for protection against fires. The necessary clearing has been 
done on 42 acres, preparatory to tree planting the coming spring. 
The forest tree nursery on the south side of the reservoir has been 
enlarged by 0.68 of an acre. In the two nurseries, 372,130 one, 
two and three year old white pine seedlings, and 26,000 two year 
old sugar maple, oak and chestnut seedlings have been transplanted 
from seed beds to nursery rows; 76,750 two year old white pine 
seedlings taken up in the nurseries, and 230,000 maple seedlings 
from Tolland, Mass., have been heeled in in the nursery on the south 
side of the reservoir ready for the spring planting. Three rows of 
white pine seedlings, 6 feet apart each way, were planted along the 
shore of the southerly side of the reservoir for a distance of 12.65 
miles. There have been 570 feet of division fences built and 11 
stone monuments set on land lines. In West Boylston, 35 dwell- 
ings, 11 barns, 5 shops, 4 stores, 1 mill and 3 halls, making a total 
of 59 buildings, have been torn down or removed during the year, 
making a total of 209 at the end of the year. The dam formerlv 
belonging to the West Boylston Manufacturing Company in the 
Quinepoxet River has been removed. A large portion of the two 
dams formerly belonging to the L. M. Harris Manufacturing Com- 
pany, having been wrecked by the spring floods, were removed. 

Sanitary Inspection. 
The camps for laborers employed upon the construction of the Wa- 
chusett Reservoir have by constant vigilance been kept fairly clean. 
Many houses in West Boylston that were located close to the streams 
and were a menace to the purity of the water have been removed. 
Further information with regard to the sanitary inspection of the 
Wachusett watershed will be found under the head of Maintenance. 



104 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Removal of Bodies from St. John's Catholic Cemetery. 

As the work of excavating progressed at the cemetery, 30 bodies 
were found, and upon notification they were removed by the rep- 
resentatives of the Cemetery Association. This makes a total of 
3,902 bodies removed from the cemetery. The last body was found 
during the week ending April 19, and after continuing the excava- 
tion until May 2 this work was discontinued, as it seemed evident 
that all the bodies had been removed. 

Engineering. 

In addition to the engineering work already enumerated and that 
necessarily connected with the contract and day-labor work in prog- 
ress, the engineering force of the Reservoir Department has per- 
formed the following work : — 

Several plans and sketches have been made for the new cemetery 
to receive the bodies to be removed from the small Beaman cemetery ; 
levels of the ground at the Wachusett Reservoir, taken after the 
completion of the excavation, have been entered on record sheets ; 
and contour lines have been drawn, covering an area of some 600 
acres, making a total area covered by these final records at the end 
of the year of 1,520 acres. Measurements have been made from 
these sheets, covering an area of 470 acres, for the purpose of de- 
termining the capacity of the reservoir, making a total area covered 
at the end of the year of 1,000 acres. Gage readings have been 
taken daily in Coachlace and Sandy ponds, and at the Prospect 
Street bridge over the Nashua River in West Boylston during floods. 
Gage readings on the storage reservoirs in the Wachusett water- 
shed have been taken on the 1st and 15th of each month, and the 
storage at each date has been computed. The water areas on the 
Wachusett watershed (ponds, rivers and brooks) have been com- 
puted. Lists have been made to determine the amount to be paid 
by the Board for taxes or in lieu of taxes to the towns of Clinton, 
Boylston and West Boylston. Surveys and investigations have 
been made to aid in determining the extent of the damage to the 
Bigelow Carpet Company by the diversion of water from its mill, 
and much other minor engineering work has been attended to. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 105 



• DAM AND AQUEDUCT DEPARTMENT. 

T. F. Richardson, Department Engineer. 

The principal work in this department has been the construction 
of the Wachusett Dam, the location and the construction of a portion 
of the relocated line of the Central Massachusetts Railroad and the 
placing of riprap on the North Dike. The department has also had 
charge of the operation of the Wachusett Aqueduct and the Clinton 
sewerage system. 

The organization of the force has continued practically the same 
as" during the previous year. Alexander E. Kastl, division engineer, 
continued in charge of the surveys for the relocation of the railroad 
•until May 10, when he resigned to accept the position of chief engi- 
neer of the Denver Union Water Company ; and Moses J. Look 
was transferred from the Reservoir Department to take charge of the 
construction of the railroad, the location having been finished under 
Mr. Kastl. Chester W. Smith, assistant engineer, continued in 
charge of the work of the Wachusett Dam. The work in the draft- 
ing office is in charge of Allen E. Shannan. Elliot R. B. Allardice 
has continued in charge of the river and aqueduct gagings, and has 
direct supervision of the maintenance of the Clinton sewerage plant. 

The engineering force at the beginning of the year numbered 21, 
and reached a maximum in August of 28. There were also 6 
masonry inspectors. 

The main office of this department is in Clinton, and a branch 
office has been maintained near the Wachusett Dam. 



Wachusett Dam. 
The design of the Wachusett Dam, and the contract for its con- 
struction, which was made with the McArthur Brothers Company on 
October 1, 1900, were described in the annual report of January 1, 
1901. The plant provided for the work and the methods of carry- 
ing on the work both at the quarry and at the dam were fully de- 
scribed in the last annual report, and there has been no material 
change in the plant or in the methods. The work has been carried 
on throughout the year, although work upon the masonry, which 
was suspended jon December 3, 1901, on account of the cold 
weather, was not resumed until March 24, 1902. On the whole, 



106 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

good progress has been made upon the work, although the progress 
does not equal the requirements of the contract. This has been 
due in part to the industrial conditions during the past year, which 
have made the work much more difficult of accomplishment, and 
have also added materially to the cost of the work to the contractor. 
As a result of the coal strike, it has been difficult to obtain a suffi- 
cient supply of coal to operate the air compressors, and at times 
there has been less than twenty-four hours' supply of coal on hand ; 
but it has not been necessary at any time to stop the work on this 
account. It has also been difficult to obtain sufficient cement, 
especially Portland cement ; and the construction of the masonry, 
particularly the concrete masonry, has been seriously delayed, in 
consequence. The shortage of cemeot has been due in part to the 
scarcity of coal, but still more to the unprecedented demand for 
cement for construction purposes all over the country. Other sup- 
plies have been obtained with difficulty, and there has been a scarcity 
of good foremen and other skilled labor. 

Main Dam and Gate-chambers, 

When the work upon the masonry was discontinued in 1901, its 
top was substantially at elevation 255, or about 19 feet below the 
bottom of the large flume, and the masonry was limited wholly to 
the length of dam between the large and small flumes. At the 
beginning of 1902, excavation was in progress for 90 feet westerly 
from the large flume ; and when the construction of masonry was 
resumed, on March 24, this excavation had been finished, except 
that the cut-oflf trench, 20 feet wide, remained to be excavated in the 
rock. To excavate this cut-off trench a derrick was installed on the 
hillside, and the rock lifted out of the trench by the derrick was 
put into small cars on a short track and dumped on the westerly 
hillside above the dam. The rock at this place was a hard, brittle 
granite, somewhat seamy, especially near the surface. The excava- 
tion was carried to a sufficient depth to obtain rock nearly free from 
seams, the average depth of the excavation in the granite rock being 
about 14 feet and in the cut-off trench about 15 feet additional. 

After the resumption of work on the masonry, the height of the 
portion of the dam between the flumes increased quite rapidly, and 
the filling on both the up-stream and the down-stream sides was 
carried* on at the same time, so that on June 22 it was feasible to 















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No. 57.] AND SEWEKAGE BOARD. 107 

remove a portion of the large flume at the site of the dam and begin 
to extend the masonry. The flow of the river at this time was so 
small that it could be turned through the small flume into the aque- 
duct, and during the construction of this portion of the dam the 
flow at no time exceeded the capacity of the small flume, so that 
there was no trouble from any overflow. 

The excavation for the foundation of the dam at the site of the 
flume was made before the flume was built, with the exception of the 
cut-off trench in the rock ; this was excavated as expeditiously as 
possible, and the masonry was extended to the end of the excava- 
tion, about 90 feet west of the flume. As the masonry was built 
up, a portion, for a length of 40 feet at the crossing of the flume, 
was left lower than other portions, thereby making what is called a 
gap in the dam, through which water may overflow when the volume 
of water flowing in the river exceeds the capacity of the small flume. 
At the end of the season this gap was left at elevation 283, which is 
about 9 feet higher than the bottom of the flume. For about 20 feet 
at the down-stream side of the dam, at this place, the masonry was 
built only to the elevation of the bottom of the flume, so that the 
water in case of overflow would fall upon the masonry. 

At the easterly end of the dam a night force was organized on 
May 8, to resume excavation from the trench between the easterly 
end of the masonry constructed during the previous year and the 
small flume, also to excavate for a foundation for the lower gate- 
chamber. Earlv in August this force be^an excavating the trench 
beyond the small flume ; and this work was continued, largely by 
the night force, until the latter part of November, when the excava- 
tion, including the cut-ofl" trench, was completed and ready for the 
masonry. The earth overlying the rock on this side of the valley 
had a depth of from 25 to 40 feet below the natural surface, though 
a portion had already been excavated in connection with the con- 
struction of the small flume. The material was a boulder clay or 
till, so compact and hard that it was found economical to loosen it 
by blasting. 

The rock in the vicinity of the small flume is a schist, generally 
black and soft, but practically impervious to water. Much of the 
earth excavated was shovelled into large skips, which were conveyed 
by the cable ways to derricks on or near the dam, which in turn 
deposited the clayey material against the up-stream face of the dam. 



108 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Some of the material was removed by wheelbarrows and carts, and 
used for filling around the lower gate-chamber and the conduits lead- 
ing from the same. The average depth of the excavation in the 
portions of the schist rock which have been excavated this year was 
about 15 feet, and the cut-oft* trench, 20 feet in width, was excavated 
to an additional depth of about 16 feet. The rock was partly re- 
moved by the cable ways and derricks, in the same manner as the 
clayey material, and dumped outside of it on the up-stream side of 
the dam, and partly removed by cableways to cars and dumped on 
the easterly hillside above the dam. 

In excavating the cut-off trench on both sides of the valley, the 
method adopted last year, and described in the last annual report, 
of drilling lines of 3-inch holes 6 inches apart on centres on both 
sides of the trench, was followed. 

As soon as the excavation for the dam had been extended as far 
as the small flume, the masonry was extended to the end of the 
excavation. This extension was sufficient to permit the construc- 
tion of the upper and lower gate-chambers, and the laying of the 
four lines of 48-inch cast-iron pipes through the dam. 

On May 18 the first concrete masonry was put in place in the sub- 
structure of the lower gate-chamber, which is built almost entirely 
of such masonry, and in all cases is founded upon the schist rock. 
In preparing the foundation, all earth and all loose or detached 
pieces of the rock were removed, but none of the more solid rock. 
As the foundation is, at the westerly side of the gate-chamber, about 
15 feet below the bottom of the wells in the gate-chamber, only the 
walls were extended to the rock, and arches were built from wall to 
wall to support the concrete in the bottom of the wells, the space 
under the arches being filled with well-compacted earth. The foun- 
dation walls below the level of the arches have been built of natural 
cement concrete masonry, mixed in the proportion of 1 part by 
measure of cement, 2 parts of sand and 5 parts of screened gravel. 
All other portions of the gate-chamber have been built with Port- 
land cement concrete, mixed generally in the proportion of 1 part 
by measure of cement, 2% parts of sand and 4% parts of screened 
gravel. 

Beginning early in September, the 48-inch cast-iron pipes which 
pass through the dam from the upper to the lower gate-chamber 
were put in place. These were set in the first instance on brick 



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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 109 

piers to hold them in place until the lead joints were calked, and 
subsequently brickwork was built under and around them to the 
height of the middle of the pipe. Brickwork was used instead of 
rubble for this portion of the work, with a view to obtaining a more 
perfect joint between the masonry and the pipe than could be ob- 
tained by the use of stone. The laying of the 48-inch pipes was 
followed by such other work as was necessary in order to provide 
for conveying the water from the upper part of the small flume 
through the permanent pipes to the aqueduct. This work consisted 
of placing the various valves and pipes in the upper and lower gate- 
chambers ; extending the aqueduct to connect with the lower gate- 
chamber; building a permanent wall on one side and a coffer-dam 
on the other side of a channel 42 feet wide, connecting the upper 
part of the small flume with the upper gate-chamber ; and placing a 
temporary wooden screen across this channel 6 feet above the upper 
gate-chamber, to prevent ice and other material from entering the 
pipes. When these works were substantially ready for use, the 
lower portion of the small flume was removed, and the extension of 
the masonry of the dam to a point 50 feet beyond the flume was 
begun. Water was first turned through the pipes on November 20. 
As it was already cold weather before the extension of the masonry 
was begun, only the up-stream part of the masonry has been built, 
and this will be raised only to such elevation as seems necessary in 
order to make this end of the dam secure against floods. 

The masonry on the up-stream side of the dam, where it is to be 
covered with earth, has been built with squared stones having joints 
not exceeding 1 inch in width. Above the level of the earth both 
the up-stream and down-stream sides are faced with ashlar, built 
in 2-foot courses with 3/2-inch joints. On a considerable portion of 
the upper face of the dam 7 courses have been laid, and on the 
down-stream side 4 courses. All of the ashlar has been obtained 
from the quarry from which the rubble for the dam has been taken. 
The masonry of the up-stream face has reached the following eleva- 
tions : — 

Sta 3 -j- 04 to Sta. 3 -j- 99, easterly end to near upper gate-chamber, . . 293 

Sta. 4 -|- 20 to Sta. 6 -\- 20, upper gate-chamber to gap through dam, . . 312 

Sta. 6 + 50 to Sta. 6 -fc 90, gap in dam, 283 

Sta. 7 -j- 15 to Sta. 7 -f- 80, gap to end of masonry, 307 

Average elevation of up-stream face of dam, 304 



110 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

In comparison with these elevations, it may be stated that the bed 
of the river at the site of the dam was at elevation 266, and the 
bottom of the pipes through the dam is at elevation 284. 

Waste Conduits, Pool and Spillway. 

The four 48-inch pipes passing through the dam and lower gate- 
chamber were extended by means of four pipes, each of which diverges 
so that its diameter increases to 8 feet in a length of 40 feet. These 
diverging pipes were made of cast-iron for a length of 5 feet, where 
they pass through the concrete, and for the remainder of the length 
are of riveted steel. At their larger ends these pipes connect with 
the waste conduits built of Portland cement concrete, which continue 
to increase in size until their area is equivalent to that of a circle 10 
feet in diameter, and they continue of this size to the pool. A small 
portion of these conduits was built of natural cement, at a time when 
Portland cement could not be obtained : but where this cement was 
used, the thickness of the walls was increased. 

The pool, which is constructed wholly of Portland cement con- 
crete, was built to the extent that it is feasible to build it until water 
is prevented from flowing over the dam, but was also constructed 
with reference to conveying while unfinished such water as may be 
discharged through the 48-inch pipes. 

Work has been continued on the spillway and apron a short dis- 
tance below the pool ; and the apron, which consists of ashlar paving 
on a rubble masonry foundation, has been completed. The curved 
retaining wall at the easterly end of the spillway has also been par- 
tially built, and some of the dry stone paving below the apron has 
been put in place. 

The building of these structures was carried on from time to time 
during the year, and the last masonry was put in place November 
30. The purpose in building these structures at this time was in 
part to furnish a place for disposing of the material to be excavated 
from time to time during the construction of the dam, but more par- 
ticularly to furnish an opportunity for conveying water from the end 
of the 48-inch pipes to the river below the dam. At the end of the 
year only a short length of wooden flume remained to be constructed, 
between the pool and the spillway, in order to complete these works 
for conveying water. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



Ill 



Amount of Work done and of Materials used. 
The following table «:ives the amount of work done to the end of 
1901, the amount of work done during 1902, the total amount done 
to the end of 1902, and, for comparison, the total estimated amount 
required by the contract : — 





To December 
31, 1801. 


In 1902. 


Total to 

December 31, 

1902. 


Total 

Estimated 
Amount. 


Earth excavation (cubic yards), 


43,000 


31,900 


74,900 


267,300 


Rock excavation (cubic yards), 


24,370 


12,020 


36,890 


100,000 


Rubble stone masonry (cubic yards), . 


28,486 


65,686 


94,172 


265,000 


Ashlar masonry (cubic yards), 


65 


684 


749 


10,300 


Dimension stone masonry (cubic yards), 


- 


58 


58 


2,900 


Brick masonry (cubic yards), 


- 


407 


407 


1,300 


Concrete masonry (cubic yards), . 


- 


5,284 


5,284 


8,300 


Iron and other metal work (tons), 


- 


582 


582 


1,000 



The number of barrels of cement used in the work at the dam has 
been as follows : — 



To December 
31, 1901. 



In 1902. 



Total to 

December 31, 

1902. 



Portland cement, 
Natural cement, 



17,703 
8,892 



21,865 
52,896 



39,568 
61,788 



All of the natural cement has been of the Union brand, and 31,839 
barrels of the Portland cement have been of the Giant brand, — 
both cements being manufactured by the American Cement Com- 
pany of Egypt, Pa. The remaining 7,729 barrels of Portland 
cement, which were either furnished by the American Cement Com- 
pany or otherwise obtained when a sufficient quantity of the Giant 
cement could not be supplied, have been of the following brands : 
4,260 barrels of Ironclad, 2,894 barrels of Atlas, 225 barrels of 
Alsen, 200 barrels of Helderberg and 150 barrels of Alpha. 

The amount of cement used in the dam per cubic yard of each 
class of rubble masonry was as follows : — 



112 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



COMPOSITION OF MORTAR BY MEASURE. 




Cubic Yards 
Built. 



1 part natural cement to 1 part sand, 
1 part natural cement to 2 parte sand. 
1 part Portland cement to 2 parts sand, . 
1 part Portland cement to 2>a parts sand, 
1 part Portland cement to 3 parts sand, . 



184 

59,451 

17,444 

8,926 

6,466 



The amount of cement used per cubic yard of each class of con- 
crete masonry was as follows : — 



COMPOSITION OF CONCRETE BY MEASURE. 


Barrels of : n-vi- v..j. 
n^^,^^. ~„_ i Cubic i ards 
Cement per ■ r> li; u 

Cubic Yard. Built ' 


1 part natural cement, 2 parts sand and 5 parts stone, 

1 part Portland cement, 2>£ parts sand and 4>£ parts stone, 

1 part Portland cement, 3 parts sand and 6 parts stone, .... 


1.36 
1.43 
1.06 


726 

4,241 

317 





Miscellaneous JSfotes. 
# The work of building the rubble masonry, as already stated, was 
resumed on March 24, and, although the weather was unusually 
favorable for the season of the year, the masonry was laid in Port- 
land cement mortar mixed in the proportion of 3 parts of sand to 
1 part of cement until April 12. Toward the latter part of the 
season masonry which was likely to be exposed subsequently to the 
action of frost was laid in Portland cement mortar of the kind above 
stated, and after November 15 all masonry was so laid. After No- 
vember 28 the sand and mortar were heated and salt was added to 
the mortar, 4 pounds being used to each barrel of cement. For 
heating the sand, a bin 16% feet long, 15% feet wide and 10 
feet deep was provided with about 20 coils of 2-inch pipe, which 
pass around the bin on the inside 2 feet from the sides of the bin. 
The sand is dumped into the top of this bin and drawn from the 
bottom, remaining in long enough to become warm. The water 
used for mixing the mortar is heated by steam, and the proper 
amount of salt for each batch of mortar is dissolved in the water. 
Steam was provided to thaw ice from the stones and masonry. 

The work of laying masonry was not started on mornings when 
the temperature was lower than 18° above zero, and not with this 
temperature unless the day was clear and a higher temperature was 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 113 

expected. After each day's work the masonry built was covered 
with canvas. Between April 12 and November 15 most of the 
masonry was laid in natural cement mortar, mixed in the proportion 
of 2 parts of sand to 1 part of cement ; but Portland cement mor- 
tar, mixed in the proportion of 2 parts of sand to 1 part of cement, 
was used as heretofore for the masonry in the cut-off trench, for the 
first courses of masonry above the ledge rock, and was also used in 
the upper gate-chamber around the brick wells. 

The largest amount of rubble masonry laid in the dam during any 
week was during the week ending August 30, when 9 derricks were 
in operation, and 2,751 cubic yards were laid. 

The building of the concrete masonry was done almost entirely at 
night, when one of the cableways could be spared to convey the con- 
crete, which was mixed in the cubical mixer on the side hill, to the 
bottom of the valley. 

All of the permanent pipes, specials and valves which have been 
built into the dam have been made very thick, to insure their perma- 
nence. The 48-inch pipes through the dam have a 2-inch shell, and 
weigh more than 1,000 pounds per foot, including the bells. The 
48-inch valves in the upper gate-chamber weigh about 9 tons each, 
without the stems. The 48-inch valves with hydraulic cylinders in 
the lower gate-chamber are not as heavily built as the others, be- 
cause they will be accessible for repairs or replacing in the future ; 
but, including the cylinders, they weigh more than 11 tons each. 
These were placed by two cableways, which were used together for 
this purpose. 

The progress of the work has rendered a part of the temporary 
works unnecessary. Mention has already been made of the removal 
of the large and small flumes where they crossed the site of the dam. 
As soon as the dam had been built to a sufficient height above the 
bottom of the large flume to hold a body of water between it and 
the temporary dam, there was no further need for the greater portion 
of the flume between the two dams, and it was removed by the con- 
tractor, leaving only about 80 feet, including the headworks, at the 
temporary dam. Later in the season the portion of the large flume 
below the dam became useless, and, as it might cause trouble at 
points below if it should be carried away by a freshet, it was re- 
moved by employes of the Board, though the work was not wholly 
completed at the end of the year. 



114 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The lower protective dam was entirely removed, in order to per- 
mit the building of the masonry of the pool. 

The height of the water in the river is still regulated at the tem- 
porary dam. The flow of the river has been so small that it lias 
been feasible to divert it through the aqueduct nearly all of the 
time; and water overflowed at the -gap in the dam only on October 
28 and 29, on November 19 and 20, when the flow into the aqueduct 
was stopped at the time of the removal of the small flume, and from 
December 17 to 31. 

Relocation or the Central Massachusetts Railroad. 

Reference to the agreement made between the Board and the 
Boston & Maine Railroad for the relocation of the Central Massa- 
chusetts Railroad around the reservoir, and a description of the new 
line and its subdivision into sections, have already been given on 
page 91. The following statement relates to the work done upon 
this railroad under the direction of the Dam and Aqueduct Depart- 
ment. 

At the beginning of the year, surveys were in progress for the 
route, which has since been adopted, between West Berlin and the 
junction with the Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division. These 
surveys were continued until the latter part. of March, when the final 
location was determined. 

From West Berlin to a point near Boylston Street in Clinton it 
was necessary to take land for the railroad, and surveys and plans 
were made for this purpose. Estimates were also made of the 
quantities of material and of the cost of the work. 

Detailed plans were made of the site of the viaduct and various 
bridges and culverts, as a basis for the design of these structures. 
An estimate was also made of the cost of building a track for the 
Central Massachusetts Railroad, parallel with the tracks of the 
Worcester, Nashua & Portland Division, from the point of junction 
to a point near Oakdale, and of the cost of abolishing the grade 
crossings of highways between the same points. 

To determine the position of the surface of the rock along the 
located line, 17 wash drill borings, having an aggregate depth of 334 
feet, and 97 rod soundings, having an aggregate depth of 584 feet, 
were made. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 115 



Contracts, Central Massachusetts Railroad. 
Section 1, Crary Construction Company. 

Date of contract, May 26, 1902 ; amount of contract, $36,767. 50 ; length of 

section, 7,740 feet: 

This section is partly in Berlin and partly in Clinton, and extends 
from the end of the iron bridge at West Berlin to near the middle 
of a swamp, a short distance easterly from the tunnel. Much of the 
excavation is through ledge, and the earth is a clayey gravel with 
boulders. All of the material from the excavations is being used to 
make the embankments, requiring, in some cases, a haul of nearly 
half a mile. There is one undergrade highway crossing with a span 
of 30 feet, five culverts and two cattle passes on this section. The 
bridge abutments are made of granite ashlar backed with concrete. 
By the terms of the contract all of the work should have been com- 
pleted on December 1. At the end of the year all masonry work 
had been completed, but there remained considerable earth and rock 
work to be done, though not more than could be finished in time for 
laying the tracks as soon as the frost is out of the ground in the 
spring. The excavation was begun on June 11. 

The average force employed was 113 men and 17 horses. The 
maximum force was 160 men and 21 horses, for the week ending 
September 20, 1901. 

Section J?, Mc Arthur Brothers Company. 

Date of contract, April 18, 1902 ; amount of contract, $236,621 ; length of section 

5,860 feet. 

As has already been stated, a contract for this section of the rail- 
road was made with the McArthur Brothers Company, contractors for 
the Wachusett Dam. This section is located for a considerable dis- 
tance within the territory where the contractor for the dam has work 
to do, and the construction of the railroad necessarily interferes with 
the work to be done under the contract for the dam. The permanent 
location of the railroad runs across the tracks upon which the west- 
erly towers supporting the cableways rest, and, if built at the present 
time, would interfere seriously with the use of the cableways. To 
obviate this trouble as far as practicable, a temporary location with 
sharp curves was adopted for a distance of 1,317 feet, so as to pass 
as far as possible around the cableway tracks, decreasing the dis- 



116 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

tance that the cableway towers can be moved in a northerly direction 
only about 80 feet. Both the permanent and temporary locations 
cross the waste channel through which water flowing over the 
waste weir is to run. And in other respects there would have been 
considerable interference had the railroad work been given to another 
contractor. There was also an advantage in having both the rail- 
road and the dam constructed by the same contractor, as it was 
possible in making the contract to provide that portions of the rail- 
way embankments should be made with material excavated at the 
dam without extra charge. 

A much more important consideration, however, was the speed 
with which the work could be done. In order to excavate the tunnel 
and heavy rock cuts with reasonable speed and economy, it would 
have been necessary for another contractor to install a large plant 
to furnish power for the work, and the time required for getting 
heavy machineiy would have resulted in serious delay. The con- 
tractor for the dam, on the other hand, had a very large air-com- 
pressing plant, which had a diminishing quantity of work to do, and 
consequently sufficient surplus power for the work upon the railroad. 
The pipes conveying the air from this power plant lead to the dam 
on both sides of the river, and it was an easy matter to extend the 
power to all portions of the new work. The contractor's organiza- 
tion was such that he began excavating at the deep rock cut at the 
westerly end of the section on April 18, the day the contract was 
signed, and also began at once to extend the compressed air mains to 
this rock cut and to both ends of the tunnel. On April 29 the work 
of excavating the approaches at both ends of the tunnel was begun. 
Tunnel excavation began at the west portal on May 31 and at the 
east portal on July 25. 

The tunnel, which is about 1,080 feet long, is 22 feet high and 16 
feet wide inside of the lining of concrete masonry. The easterly 
790 feet of the tunnel are through a hard, close-grained granite, 
comparatively free from seams ; and it is not the intention to line 
this part of the tunnel with masonry except for a short distance at 
the portal, where the frost will affect the rock. The excavation, 
however, is being made sufficiently large for the lining in places 
where it is not the intention to line it. For 200 feet the surface of 
the rock is slightly below the top of the tunnel, so that the top is in 
earth, and for the remaining 90 feet it is only a short distance above 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 117 

the top of the tunnel, so that it will be necessary to line the whole 
290 feet with masonry. For a total distance of 228 feet it has been 
necessary to support the top of the tunnel with heavy timbers during 
construction. The lining masonry will be carried a short distance 
outside of the tunnel, so that the length from portal to portal of the 
finished tunnel will be 1,110 feet. 

The headings, which comprise the upper third of the tunnel, were 
excavated for their whole length before any bench was started at the 
easterly end, and before much of the bench had been excavated at 
the westerly end. They met during the week ending November 29. 
The average progress per w T eek at the easterly end, where there was 
no timber, w T as nearly 60 feet, while through the timbered heading 
at the westerly end the progress was about 16 feet per week. The 
excavation to grade was started outside the tunnel at the westerly 
end during the week ending August 30, and at the end of the vear 
this excavation had been carried into the tunnel, so that the tunnel 
was fully excavated for a distance of about 220 feet. At the easterly 
end of the tunnel at the end of the year the rock cut had not been 
completed to grade for nearly 200 feet from the end of the tunnel, 
but a derrick had been set up for the purpose of starting upon 
the excavation of the bench, or lower part of the tunnel, wnthout 
waiting for the completion of the rock cut. No bench, however, 
had been excavated at the end of the year. 

The material excavated from the easterly approach and from the 
easterly portion of the tunnel w r as used for making the high embank- 
ment in the low land at the easterly end of the section ; the material 
excavated from the westerly end of the tunnel was deposited where 
it w T ould fill a depression on the hillside a short distance below the 
dam. 

The tunnel portals are to be finished with head walls of granite 
backed with concrete masonry, and some of the stones for this work 
have been cut, but none of them have been put in place, nor has any 
of the concrete masonry lining of the tunnel been built. 

Adjoining the tunnel on the w T est is the site of the steel viaduct 
across the valley of the river, and the masonry, consisting of 2 
abutments and 32 pedestals, is included in the contract for Sec- 
tion 2. All of this masonry is composed of coursed granite, with 
a backing or coi;e and foundation of Portland cement concrete. 
One of the abutments and 6 of the pedestals are founded on schist 



118 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pul>. Doc. 

ledge rock, 4 pedestals on boulder clay, 4 on sand, and 1 abutment 
and 18 pedestals on gravel. The 14 pedestals in the bottom of the 
valley, some of which had to be built to a height of 25 feet in 
order to have their tops above the level of the restored mill-pond 
of the Lancaster Mills, are 7 feet square under the cap stones, 
which are 4 feet 6 inches square and 20 inches thick ; while the 
remaining 18 pedestals are 6 feet square under cap stones, usually 
4 feet square and 20 inches thick. The batters on all of the pedes- 
tals are 1% inches per foot. The stone for this masonry was taken 
from the quarry which supplies the stone for the dam, except for 8 
pedestals in the bottom of the valley, the stones for which were 
obtained from the quarry of H. E. Fletcher & Co., West Chelms- 
ford, Mass. Work was commenced on the Boylston Street abut- 
ment on June 4, and at the end of the year all of the masonry had 
been finished except 4 pedestals in the bottom of the valley. The 
concrete masonry foundations for these pedestals were in place, and 
the stone had been delivered but not set. A considerable amount 
of stone is still to be deposited in the bottom of the valley, to pro- 
tect the pedestals from erosion. 

On the westerly side of the river the principal work required by 
the contract is the excavation of the long and deep rock cut through 
the side of the hill. By the requirements of the contract, the rock 
taken from this cut w T as to be separated, in accordance with its size, 
into tw T o classes, and deposited on the outer slope of the North Dike 
as riprap ; the smaller pieces being used in the inner portion of the 
riprap, and the larger pieces, which generally contain 11/2 cubic feet 
or more, on the outside. In order to facilitate the progress of this 
work, a second opening was provided nearly in the middle of the 
cut by making a side entrance at a place where the depth was com- 
paratively small. 

The excavated rock has been loaded into " skips " having a capac- 
ity of about \y% cubic yards of solid rock, and these were placed 
by means of derricks on flat cars which were hauled by mules to the 
North Dike, where the "skips" were again hoisted by a travelling 
derrick, swung around to the proper place and dumped. 

The protection on the face of the dike consists, first, of a thick 
layer of unscreened coarse gravel ; second, a layer of broken stone 
or screened gravel about 1 foot in thickness ; and outside of these 
a layer of riprap, which is thicker at the top than at the bottom, and 
which has a horizontal thickness of 18 feet at elevation 391, which 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



119 



is 4 feet below full-reservoir level. The outer 6 feet are composed 
mostly of stones which contain 1% cubic feet or more, while the 
remainder is composed of the smaller stones. The top of the rip- 
rap is at elevation 400, which is 5 feet above full-reservoir level ; 
and its bottom rests on a gravel berm at elevation 382, or on the 
natural surface of the ground when higher than this level. It has 
not been thought necessary to place riprap below the berm, except, 
to a limited extent, opposite Sandy Pond ; because, if the water in 
the reservoir is lowered nearly to the level of the berm, it will be so 
shallow in the vicinity of the dike that there can be no waves of any 
considerable magnitude. 

In addition to the riprap on the dike, the portion of the railroad 
embankment which will be exposed to the waves in the reservoir 
was also protected with riprap in the same general manner as the 
North Dike, although not quite as thoroughly. At the end of the 
season the riprap had been completed on the railroad embankment 
and for a distance of 1,320 feet along the dike. The distance to 
which it was necessary to haul the riprap increased as the work pro- 
gressed, and some of it was hauled 3,300 feet at the end of the year. 

The following table gives the total quantity of work done to the 
end of the year, and the total estimated amount of work included in 
the contract : — 



Work done Total Esti- 
to December mated Amount 



81, 1902. 



of Work. 



Earth excavation (cubic yards), . 
Rock excavation (cubic yards), . 
Tunnel excavation (cubic yards), ... 
Concrete masonry not in tunnel (cubic yards), 
Concrete masonry in tunnel (cubic yards),. 
Dimension stone masonry (cubic yards), . 



18,500 

26,100 

7,800 

1,920 



490 



30,900 

45,300 

18,300 

2,460 

1,800 

870 



While a large amount of work has been done since April 18, the 
date of the contract, the progress of the work is considerably behind 
the requirements of the contract, and it will require very energetic 
work to complete the contract within the required time. 

The average force employed by the contractor was 166 men and 
18 horses ; and the maximum force was 223 men and 27 horses, 
for the week ending August 23. 



120 METROPOLITAN WATER fPub. Doc. 



Steel Viaduct and Bridges, American Bridge Company/ of New 

York. 

Date of contract, July 23, 1902 ; amount of contract, $91,450. 
This contract includes the steel viaduct over Boylston Street and 
the Nashua River valley in Clinton, the bridge over the highway in 
Berlin on Section 1 of the railroad, and the bridge over the West 
Boylston Road in Clinton on Section 3 of the railroad. The via- 
duct, as already stated, is to have a length of 917 feet and a height 
above the lowest part of the valley of 133 feet. The bridge in 
Berlin has a span of 30 feet, and the bridge in Clinton, which 
crosses the highway at a considerable angle, has a span of 43 feet. 
Plate-girder construction will be used throughout. At the viaduct 
the spans between towers are 72 feet, and at the towers 38 feet. 
The span from the last tower to the abutment at the westerly end is 
53 feet, and at the easterly end 60 feet. It is provided in the con- 
tract that all three bridges shall be erected on or before March 1, 
1903. At the end of the year one of the small bridges was com- 
pleted but not erected, nearly all of the remaining material had been 
rolled, and the shop work upon the viaduct had been begun. 

Mortar Experiments. 

Mention was made in the last annual report of the extended series 
of experiments to determine the relative strength of mortars used 
immediately after wetting and mixing, and when used at different 
intervals up to two hours after they are first wet and mixed. These 
experiments were made entirely with Union natural and Giant Port- 
land cements, which were the only brands used at that time in the 
dam. During the past year, when several brands of Portland cement 
have been used in the construction of the dam, this series of ex- 
periments has been extended to include three of the brands of Port- 
land cement used in the dam, namely, Atlas and Ironclad, which are 
American cements, and Alsen, which is a German cement, and, in 
addition, an English Portland cement and two brands of American 
natural cement. The experiments were made with different grades 
of sand and with mortar which was worked continuously until put 
into the molds, also with mortar which was not worked after being 
first mixed until immediately before being put into the molds. 

The time required for the briquettes of neat cement to set, so that 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 121 

they would bear the light and heavy Gilmore needles, averaged for 
the natural cements 33 and 83 minutes, and for the Portland cements 
89 and 330 minutes, respectively. The briquettes were broken at 
the end of 7 days, 28 days, 3 months and 6 months after mixing. 
The results were generally in accordance with those obtained with 
the Union and Giant brands last vear, as given in the last annual 
report. 

Taking first the results with the two brands of natural cement, it 
was found that breaking tests at the end of 7 days indicated consid- 
erable loss of strength when the mortar was put into the molds 1% 
and 2 hours after being first wet, instead of being put in immediately 
after mixing ; but the breaking tests at the end of longer periods 
showed that delay in putting the mortar into the molds increased its 
strength. Briquettes broken at the end of 6 months showed an 
increase of 40 per cent, in strength, as the result of a delay of 1% 
or 2 hours in filling the molds. 

The results with the four brands of Portland cement showed that, 
whether the briquettes were broken at the end of 7 days or at longer 
periods, there was no loss of strength because of delay in filling 
the molds, even when the delay was as much as 2 hours, and the 
mortar after being first mixed was not again worked until immedi- 
ately before filling the molds, and that there was a slight gain in 
strength when the mortar was mixed continuously. 

In making these experiments 2,496 briquettes were made and 
broken. 

In addition to the above-described experiments, others were made 
in January and December, tq determine the effect upon the strength 
of the Portland cement mortar of the addition of salt in cold weather, 
and of the heating of the materials of which the mortar was composed ; 
also, to what extent the strength of such mortar was affected by 
freezing, when mixed with both fresh and salt water. The mortar 
used in the experiments was composed of 1 part by measure of 
cement to 3 parts of sand. Salt was added to the mortar in the 
proportion of 4 pounds, 8 pounds and 16 pounds per barrel of cement. 
Briquettes were made to be broken 7 days, 28 days, 3 months, 6 
months and 1 year after mixing. Only a portion of the briquettes 
have been broken up to the present time. The experiments indi- 
cated that the addition of salt to and the heating of the ingredients 

f 

of the mortar have but little if any effect upon the strength of the 



122 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

mortar. The briquettes which were frozen, when broken at the end 
of 7 days, had less strength than the briquettes not frozen ; but at 
the end of 28 days they had more nearly the same strength, indi- 
cating that, while the mortar is slower setting, it may not be per- 
manently injured by freezing. There were 970 briquettes made for 
these experiments. 

Improvement of Channel of Nashua River below the Lan- 
caster Mills in Clinton. 

Under the provisions of the Metropolitan Water Act, the Board 
is required to let only a comparatively small stream of water run 
down the river below the Wachusett Dam. Below the Lancaster 
Mills there is but little fall in the river down to the partly demol- 
ished dam near Water Street, and the stream receives manufactur- 
ing wastes from the mills, including tar and other waste products 
from the works which furnish eras for the mills. The bed of the 
river was somewhat irregular, and the water affected by these wastes 
from the mills stood in places in shallow pools or was spread out 
among the stones of which the river bed was composed, causing an 
unpleasant appearance and disagreeable odors, especially during the 
summer and early fall. These conditions were the cause of com- 
plaint from the residents of a section of Clinton known as Ger- 
mantown, near the river below the mills. A number of pipes in 
Germantown, carrying domestic sewage, also discharged into this 
part of the river channel, and it was used as a dump for tin cans 
and similar refuse. 

In order to improve the conditions, a channel 3,750 feet long, 12 
feet wide and about 1 foot deep was formed in the lowest part of the 
river bed, extending from the point where most of the water from 
the Lancaster Mills enters the river nearly to the dam near Water 
Street ; and an extension of the channel was carried 600 feet further 
up the river with a width of 6 feet, to receive the water from the 
gas works and bleachery. The tin cans and other refuse were 
gathered up and buried, and the shallow pools filled with material 
excavated from the channel. Such trees and brush along the river 
banks as were objectionable were cut down and burned. 

By these improvements, the flow of the river, when small, passes 
through the new central channel, and does not spread over the other 
portions of the river bed, and no complaints have been received 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 12? 

from the residents along this part of the river since these improve- 
ments were made. This work was begun July 18 and finished 
August 23. An average force of 23 men and 2 horses was employed. 

Real Estate, Care and Disposal. 
Rents have been collected and repairs made on houses belonging 
to the Board in the neighborhood of the dam and South Dike and 
of the Clinton sewerage filter-beds in Lancaster. 

Cement Tests. 

The usual tables of tests of cements used in the dam and in the 
masonry of the Central Massachusetts Railroad may be found in 
Appendix No. 2. 

SUDBURY DEPARTMENT. 
Desmond FitzGekald, Department Engineer. 

The work in this department relates mainly to the maintenance 
and operation of the Sudbury and Cochituate works, including the 
aqueducts and Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

The work of construction in this department during the year has 
been connected almost entirely with the improvement of certain shal- 
low arms of Lake Cochituate, known as the Pegan Brook and Snake 
Brook meadows, as required by chapter 509 of the Acts of the year 
1901. In addition, works have been constructed for intercepting 
the waters of brooks flowing from the settled portions of Natick, and 
conveying them to a point where they can be pumped to the Pegan 
Brook filter-beds and purified before being discharged into the lake. 
Mr. FitzGerald and his assistants have also devoted a considerable 
amount of time to the case of the Nashua River Paper Company v. 
Commonwealth for damages caused by the diversion of the waters 
of the Nashua River, and to other cases. 

The resignation, on November 15, of Mr. FitzGerald, and the 
placing of the work of his department in charge of Mr. Haberstroh, 
assistant superintendent, and Mr. Sherman, division engineer, have 
already been referred to at the beginning of my report. 

Benjamin F. Goodnough, assistant engineer, has been in imme- 
diate charge of the improvements at Lake Cochituate. 

The engineering force engaged upon construction has varied from 
3 to 5. 

The offices of this department are in Boston and South Framingham . 



124 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Improvement of Lake Cochituate. 

The Act of the General Court, under which the removal of mud 
from Snake Brook and Pegan Brook meadows has been done, required 
the excavation "to be made to a level of three feet above the bottom 
of the aqueduct," or 10.33 feet below high water; "provided, how- 
ever, that the amount so expended shall not exceed one hundred thou- 
sand dollars ; and if the board shall find it impossible to excavate 
said meadows to the depth specified and to carry out all the provi- 
sions hereof for said sum, then the work shall be prosecuted to such 
extent as may reasonably be done for the sum of one hundred thou- 
sand dollars." 

It was evident before the work was entered upon that $100,000 
would not be sufficient to complete the excavation to the depth speci- 
fied, and accordingly the removal of mud at Snake Brook Meadow 
was carried to a depth of 9 feet below high water. As the work at 
this point was completed for a less sum than had been anticipated, 
it was possible to carry the excavation at Pegan Meadow to a some- 
what greater depth, and the mud was therefore removed to a level 
about 9.8 feet below hiffh water. The event has demonstrated, how- 
ever, that this excavation was carried somewhat too low, as the com- 
pletion of necessary work has already made the total cost of the 
improvement about $102,000. 

Snake Brook Meadow. 
At the beginning of the vear the excavation of mud under the con- 

CO v 

tract of Long & Little was nearly finished, as stated in the last annual 
report, and work w r as then in progress. The excavation was com- 
pleted early in January, and the gravel facing of the embankments 
was finished on January 22. The total quantity of mud excavated 
and placed in embankments was 52,631 cubic yards, and 5,247 cubic 
yards of gravel were used in facing the embankments. The maximum 
force employed by the contractor during 1902 was 65 men and 32 
horses, on January 7. 

During the winter and spring the embankments settled, and in a 
number of places the slopes became badly distorted. A small day- 
labor force was employed during October and November in placing 
gravel to repair these slopes, and in excavating and embanking the 
channel of Snake Brook from the point where the contract work 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 125 

ceased, at the mouth of Hammond's Brook, to Main Street, a dis- 
tance of about 960 feet. The channel of Hammond's Brook was also 
cleaned out as far as Lake Street. 

Peg an Brook Meadow. 

At the beginning of the year, the work of excavating a main ditch 
for the drainage of this meadow was in progress with a day-labor 
force, and was completed on February 17. Pumping was then 
stopped and the water allowed to rise over the meadow. The ditch 
was about 2,500 feet long, and extended from the northerly end of 
the meadow near Kansas Street to a pump well near the Boston & 
Albany Railroad. On April 5, although the lake was full and the 
water was 6 feet deep over the meadow, the pumps were started 
again ; and on April 20 the meadow, which was cut off from the 
main portion of the lake by a dam, was bare. The pumps were at 
all times operated by the employes of the Board. 

A parcel of land containing 2.95 acres, adjoining land of the 
Commonwealth and just north of the meadow, was purchased for 
use as a gravel pit, as it proved impossible to find a sufficient quan- 
tity of suitable gravel at any other point within reasonable distance 
of the meadow. 

Four bids for improving the meadow were received on May 6 ; 
the contract was awarded to the lowest bidder, Auguste Saucier of 
South Framingham, Mass., at 22% cents per cubic yard for mud 
excavation and 36 cents per cubic yard for gravel excavation. He 
began operations on May 12, and prosecuted the work vigorously, 
completing it on December 20. The main-drainage ditch and the 
tributary ditches drained the meadow so thoroughly that excavation 
was carried on very advantageously. The mud, being of a peaty 
nature, was easily handled, and large loads were readily carried. 
In various portions of the work the contractor made use of wheel- 
barrows, carts, and cars drawn by a stationary engine ; each had 
special advantages under particular conditions of haul, and all proved 
satisfactory. 

Late in the autumn, when the lake had been drawn very low, the 
contractor was required to remove the dam separating the meadow 
from the lake to a point about 7 feet below the level of high water. 
A considerable part of this dam was composed of gravel of fair 
quality, which was used in facing the embankments ; the remainder 



126 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

was sand, which was placed on top of some of the embankments, 
for the double object of constructing a surface which would bear up 
a horse and of protecting the peaty material against fire. 

The total quantity of material excavated under this contract was 
157,962 cubic yards of mud and 28,543 cubic yards of gravel. The 
largest force employed was 162 men and 38 horses, on August 2. 

When the work of excavation was in progress, the water pumped 
for the drainage of the meadow was thereby made unfit to be turned 
into the lake, and it was discharged upon the Pegan filter-beds for 
purification. As the quantity of water filtering through the gravel 
from the lake and from the land side, added to the flow of the brooks, 
made a very large quantity to dispose of on the filter-beds, a system 
of ditches and drain pipes was provided to carry the pure w r ater to a 
second pump well, so that it could be pumped directly into the lake. 
The pumps were stopped on November 28, as all work requiring 
pumping was then completed. 

Extension of the Pegan Brook Filtration System. 

For nine years the waters of Pegan Brook have been pumped to 
filter-beds for purification before entering the lake. In connection 
with the improvements at the Pegan Brook Meadow and the need for 
a more efficient pumping station at Pegan Brook, it was thought 
advisable to intercept the waters of four small brooks which drained 
a somewhat thickly settled portion of Natick and discharged into the 
Pes:an Brook Meadow, and conduct them to a small receiving reser- 
voir to be connected with the new pumping station. For this pur- 
pose an intercepting ditch about 3,000 feet long was constructed 
alon£ and near the inner ed^e of the embankment made for the 
improvement of the meadow, from a new culvert under Kansas 
Street to a reservoir of about 1,000,000 gallons capacity, which was 
excavated by the contractor for the improvement of the Pegan Brook 
Meadow near the site of the new pumping station. 

In order to equalize as much as possible the freshet flows, the 
small pond north of Kansas Street was included in the system as 
an equalizing reservoir. The level of Kansas Street was raised by 
permission of the authorities of the town of Natick, and a concrete 
arched culvert was built under the street at the proper level for con- 
necting the pond with the upper end of the intercepting ditch. To 
provide for emptying the equalizing reservoir if it should be neces- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 127 

sary at any time, an 8-inch pipe was laid under the street at a low 
level. Three storm overflows were also provided for wasting freshet 
water from the ditch into the lake whenever the pumps and reser- 
voirs may be unable to take care of it. The works for this improve- 
ment, with the exception of the reservoirs, were built by a day-labor 
force. A 20-inch pipe has been laid from the bottom of the new 
reservoir to the location of the new pumping station, to be subse- 
quently described under the head of Maintenance. 

WESTON AQUEDUCT DEPARTMENT. 

Horace Ropes, Department Engineer. 

The work of this department has related solely to the construction 
of the Weston Aqueduct, Weston Reservoir and other structures 
pertaining to this new conduit of 300,000,000 gallons daily capacity, 
extending from the Sudbury Reservoir in Southborough to a point 
west of the Charles River in Weston, where it connects with main 
pipe lines leading to the Metropolitan Water District. 

During the year work has progressed actively all along the line, 
and much more work has been done than in the previous year. 

The greater amount of work in progress this year, after the re- 
sumption of active operations in the spring, made it necessary to 
increase the size of the engineering force, and at the same time 
made it advisable to modify to some extent the organization of the 
force. Edward S. Larned was advanced from the position of divi- 
sion engineer to that of principal assistant engineer on April 1, and 
was given general supervision, under the department engineer, of 
the work and materials of construction, and acted in this capacity 
until early in August, when the position was abolished. On April 
1 the four assistant engineers, Dan B. Clark, Frank E. Winsor, 
Marshall Nevers and George W. Booth, assigned to divisions of 
the work, were promoted to the rank of division engineers, and 
were placed in charge of all work on their respective divisions. 
The increasing amount of field work made it necessary to relieve 
Mr. Winsor of the supervision of the drafting work in the Saxon- 
ville office, and on March 5 Walter W. Patch, assistant engineer, 
was transferred from the Sudbury Department, and given charge of 
the records, drafting and computing at the main office. Since 
August 1, Mr. Patch has also directed the work of the cement- 
testing laboratory. - - 



128 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The total engineering force at the beginning of the year was 37, 
and in addition there was 1 masonry inspector. As the work in- 
creased additions were made, until in August the engineering force 
reached a maximum of 70, including 16 engineering inspectors, 
and there were also 10 masonry inspectors. At the end of the year 
the force had decreased to 58, and 3 masonry inspectors. At times 
a small day-labor force has been employed to do miscellaneous 
work. 

In addition to the main office of the department in Saxon ville, 
branch offices have been maintained throughout the vear at Framing- 
ham, Way land and Weston, for the use of the engineers of the first, 
third and fourth divisions, respectively. 

Weston Aqueduct. 

A full description of this aqueduct, accompanied by a map, was 
given in the last annual report. Early in 1901 contracts were made 
for the construction of those portions of the aqueduct which it was 
thought would require the longest time for completion, because of 
the tunnel work included therein. At the end of August in that 
year contracts for additional sections were let, but the season was 
too far advanced for much progress to be made that year. At the 
beginning: of 1902 there were yet remaining three sections for which 
contracts had not been made. Of these, the contract for the steel 
siphon pipes and other works on sections 7 and 9 was signed on 
March 8 ; and that for laying three lines of cast-iron pipes and doing 
other work on Section 1, near the Sudbury Dam, was signed on 
June 19. This completed the main contracts for the construction 
of the aqueduct and reservoir, which comprised 9.14 miles of masonry 
aqueduct in open trench, 2.30 miles of aqueduct in five tunnels, 0.98 
of a mile of steel and cast-iron pipes, and 1.02 miles of open channel 
and reservoir, — a total of 13.44 miles. Several other contracts of 
less importance w T ere made during the year, providing for hauling 
cast-iron pipes from the railroad to Section 1, for a blow-off pipe 
and ditch leading from the siphon pipe on Section 9, and for stone 
superstructures at four siphon and two gaging chambers. 

The progress of the work to date upon the different contracts and 
a comparison with the total amount of work to be done on each are 
given in the following tables, which show the length of aqueduct 
built and the value of work performed. These tables show that, 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



129 



taking the contracts as a whole, 70 per cent, of the total length of 
aqueduct has been built, and the value of the work performed is 66 
per cent, of the whole. 

Table showing Length of Aqueduct built and to be built, December 31, 1902. 



NUMBER OF SECTION. 



Built to 

December 

31, 1901 

(Feet). 



Built in 

1902 
(Feet). 



Total to 

December 

31, 1902 

(Feet). 



To 
be built 
(Feet). 



Total 
Length 
(Feet). 



1, • 

2, . 

3, . 

4, . 

5, . 

6, . 

7, • 

8, . 

9, . 

10, . 

11, • 

12, . 

13, . 
15, . 

Totals, 





2,449 

1,479 

3,271 

1,567 

841 



494 







1,264 

751 





12,116 



226 
4,127 
2,804 

879 
3,432 
2,294 
2,126 
2,969 
1,125 

3,951 
3,149 
3,586 
3,294 



33,962 



226 
6,576 
4,283 
4,150 
4,999 
3,135 
2,126 
3,463 
1,125 

3,951 
4,413 
4,337 
3,294 



46,078 



311 

1,861 

1,217 



301 

1,383 

1,480 





2,923 

2,634 

2,087 

2,963 

2,427 



19,587 



537 
8,437 
5,500 
4,150 
5,300 
4,518 
3,606 
3,463 
1,125 
2,923 
6,585 
6,500 
7,300 
5,721 



65,665 



Note. — In estimating the length of aqueduct built, the portions of tunnels in which side lining and 
arch have been built are included, and three-fourths of the portions of tunnels excavated but not lined. 



Value of Work done and to be done, December 31, 1902. 









Amount 
of 


Value of 


Per Cent, of 


SECTION. 


Contractor. 


Date of 
Contract. 


Work done to 
Decembei 


Work done to 
December 










31, 1902. 


31, 1902. 


1 


•T. H. Gill & Co., . 


June 19, 1902, 


$29,030 00 


$20,500 00 


71 


2 


Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . 


May 9, 1901, 


200,477 00 


136,500 00 


68 


3 


Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . 


May 9, 1901, 


127,507 50 


88,500 00 


69 


4 


Patrick McGovern, 


May 6, 1901, 


61,161 69 


61,161 69 


100 


5 


Bruno, Salomone & Petitti, . 


May 8, 1901, 


129,300 00 


119,300 00 


92 


6 


Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . 


May 9, 1901, 


112,600 00 


78,700 00 


70 


7 and 9 


Edward Kendall & Sons, 


March 8, 1902, 


134,990 00 


116,400 00 


86 


8 and 10 


Winston & Co., 


Aug. 28, 1901, 


146,139 00 


80,000 00 


55 


11 


Winston & Co , 


Aug. 28, 1901, 


148,635 00 


95,000 00 


64 


12 


Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . 


May 9, 1901, 


134,096 50 


95,900 00 


71 


13 


Columbus Construction Co., 
successor to Michael H. 












Keefe 


May 20, 1901, 


403,000 00 


253,800 00 


63 


14 


Nawn & Brock, 


Nov. 26, 1901, 


58,490 00 


31,600 00 


54 


15 


Winston & Co., 


Aug. 28, 1901, 


171,645 00 


97,200 00 


57 


Reservoir. 












1 


Nawn & Brock, 


Nov. 26, 1901, 


59,587 50 


9,900 00 


17 


2 


Nawn & Brock, 


Nov. 26, 1901, 


88,292 50 


38,200 00 


43 




$2,004,951 69 


$1,322,661 69 


66 



130 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Contracts, Weston Aqueduct. 

Section 1. — Headwords and Connections at Sudbury Darn. 

Contractor, T. H. Gill & Co.; date of contract. June 19, 1902; amount of contract, 
$29,030; length of section, 537 feet, including three lines of 60-inch cast-iron pipes 
and 57 feet of masonry section in head-house and aqueduct. 

The contractor began work promptly, and made good progress 
until cold weather forced him to stop operations. The value of the 
work performed to the end of the year was 71 per cent, of the total 
amount ; and, while the contractor did not accomplish all that was 
required by the contract, the portions performed were by far the 
most difficult and exactino\ 

To be properly prepared to care for the freshet flow from the Sud- 
bury Reservoir, it was essential that certain parts of the work should 
be substantially completed and ready for operation before stopping 
work for the winter. The contractor succeeded in attainino- this 
result. 

The work accomplished comprises the new channel with its con- 
crete floor, masonry sidewalls — including the abutments for the 
arched bridge — and heavy stone paving ; the laying of the three 
lines of 60-inch cast-iron pipes, extending from their connections 
with the 48-inch outlet pipes from the reservoir, for a distance of 
about 220 feet, to a point a short distance easterly from the cham- 
ber containing the valves which regulate the discharge from these 
pipes into the channel ; and the completion of the outlet and valve 
chambers. The unfinished ends of the two lines of 60-inch pipes 
for the side outlets have been strongly bulkheaded, so as to permit 
the discharge of at least 200,000,000 gallons daily from each pipe 
into the channel. 

The sand required for concrete and mortar was obtained from 
adjacent private land, while the contractor's stone crusher and rotary 
screen, erected on the work early in the season, furnished the nec- 
essary crushed stone. 

The 60-inch cast-iron pipes and other heavy castings were put in 
place by a large derrick. The Board purchased and delivered on 
the ground all the cast-iron pipes and special castings required, 
amounting to 930 tons. The greater part of these had been de- 
livered prior to letting the contract, by agreement with L. F. Childs 
of Framingham. He was paid $1.25 per ton for unloading the pipes 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 131 

from the cars at Fayville and hauling them to convenient points on 
the section. The maximum force employed on this section was 73 
men and 8 horses, for the week ending August 30. 



Sections 2, 3, 6 and 12. — Masonry Aqueduct and Tunnels. 

Contractor, Shanahan, Casparis & Co.; date of contracts, May 9, 1901; amount of con- 
tracts, $574,681 ; length of aqueduct, 24,955 feet, including 5,879 linear feet of tunnels. 
The aqueduct on sections 2 and 3 has a width of 10 feet, and on sections 6 and 12 a 
width of 13 feet 2 inches. 

The work which was started and in progress on all these sections 
in 1901 has been continued throughout the year, subject only to the 
interruptions to open trench work due to the cold weather. The 
contractor has been confronted by many difficulties from time to 
time, and is somewhat more behind the requirements of the con- 
tracts than at the beginning of the year ; but the work is still in such 
condition that it is possible to finish it within the required time. 

At the beginning of the year, scarcely more than a start had been 
made in the excavation of the tunnels on sections 2 and 3. At the 
end of the year, tunnel No. 1, which is 704 feet long, had been 
excavated for rather more than half its length; tunnel No. 2, which 
is 3,015 feet long, had been excavated to within 5 feet of the meet- 
ing point; and tunnel No. 3, which is 2,160 feet long, had been 
excavated for its full length. 

In tunnel No. 1, at the beginning of the year, work was in prog- 
ress at the easterly portal ; but, owing to the use of inefficient 
methods and the presence of an incompetent superintendent, the 
tunnel caved in several times, causing serious delays. After the 
caving in of the roof, on February 6, the work was completely aban- 
doned until July 7. After other futile attempts to advance the 
excavation and masonry lining of the tunnel, the contractor was 
required, on August 16, to adopt more efficient methods, and to 
place the work under a more competent superintendent. Since this 
was done, the excavation and masonry, which have been carried on 
at both ends of the tunnel, have progressed smoothly and without 
accident until December 8, when the work was again shut down at 
the west end, because preparations had not been made to meet the 
winter conditions. 

The tunnel is being excavated through a ridge of compact material 
which is hard to penetrate with a pick, and when freshly exposed 



132 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

appears quite dry and self-sustaining ; soon after exposure, however, 
moisture begins to gather, and the material rapidly softens and 
begins to run, bringing considerable weight on the timbers. The 
material has the appearance of clay, but it is to a large extent a very 
compact, fine sand. 

The system of timbering used is the common form of a cap and 
inclined legs resting on the wall plates, which are. supported by 
plumb posts. There is no trouble in setting the roof timbers before 
the ground begins to soften ; therefore, with timbers of sufficient 
strength properly placed, and with careful attention to driving the 
lagging close and tight, very little complication or difficulty need be 
experienced in the work. 

The original plans provided alternative methods for the lining of 
this tunnel ; a brick lining was to be used if the material was to a 
large extent self-sustaining, otherwise a concrete lining was to be 
used. At the beginning of the work the brick lining was used, but 
it was soon found that it would be necessary to resort to heavy tim- 
bering, and the concrete lining was therefore adopted. The concrete 
is made with Portland cement, mixed in the proportion of 1 part by 
measure of cement to 2% parts of sand and 4% parts of broken 
stone or screened gravel, and is built in short lengths of from 16 to 
20 feet, as the excavation of the bench advances, in this way keeping 
it always near the end of the work. Owing to the difficulty of plac- 
ing the invert while the other work is in progress, this portion of 
the lining is omitted until the excavation is completed or until it 
becomes necessary. At the end of the year the tunnel lining had a 
total length of 375 feet. 

For eight weeks in the latter part of the year the average total 
weekly progress of the excavation for both ends of the tunnel was 21 
feet of full section. Excavation is suspended while the masonry is 
building, which in part accounts for the low rate of progress. At 
the end of the year 305 linear feet remained to be excavated. 

Tunnel No. 2, which is 3,015 feet long, was excavated wholly 
through granite and diorite formations. At the beginning of the 
year the excavation of the tunnel at its easterly end was in progress, 
and excavation was begun at the westerly portal on January 20. 
As already stated, this tunnel was excavated for substantially its full- 
length at the end of the year, as the headings were within 5 feet of 
the meeting point. None of the masonry lining has as yet been built. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 133 

Tunnel No. 3, which is 2,160 feet long, was excavated for the 
greater part of its length through granite and diorite formations, 
though for about 125 feet near the easterly end and about 50 feet 
near the centre of the tunnel the surface of the ledge was below the 
top, and the overlying earth required to be supported by timbering. 
At the beginning of the year the excavation of the tunnel at its west- 
erly end was in progress, but at the easterly end the excavation of 
the portal cut did not reach a point where the tunnel could be begun 
until February 20. The heading at this point was barely started 
when a thaw and heavy rains caused the sides of the portal cut to 
slip, filling the bottom of the cut with a soft, semi-fluid clayey ma- 
terial, and completely blocking the work. This was not removed 
so that tunnelling could be resumed at this point until May 12. At 
the point selected for the portal the ledge had sufficient height to in- 
clude the full section of the tunnel, but its surface dipped so that 60 
feet in from the portal the clayey earth appeared in the top of the 
tunnel. This condition extended for a distance of 125 feet, and re- 
quired heavy timbering to sustain the roof of the tunnel. In order 
to guard against any settling of the timbers and adjacent portions of 
the roof, the concrete lining was built from the portal to the inner 
end of the timbering. 

In excavating from the westerly end the only special difficulty 
encountered was at a point about 800 feet in from the portal, where 
a depression in the ledge caused the work to be partly in rock and 
partly in boulder c\slj for 50 feet. This portion had to be timbered. 
Later, as the ground above settled, the timbers began to yield, and 
it became necessary to quickly secure the same by building the 
masonry lining through this portiqn of the tunnel. In all 240 feet 
of concrete lining were built in this tunnel during the year. The 
headings met on December 24, at a point 1,662 feet from the west- 
erly portal and 498 feet from the easterly portal. 

The very much smaller progress at the easterly end was due to the 
late date of starting the work, and to the considerable delays caused 
by timbering and the building of the concrete lining. 

In tunnels Nos. 2 and 3 the contractor first adopted the plan of 
excavating a bottom heading about 7 feet high to the full width of 
the tunnel, leaving the remainder of the section to be removed later. 
After an extended trial of this method, it was decided, late in March, 
to be more economical to excavate the full section of the tunnel at 



134 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

one time, and this has since been done. At the end of the year there 
remained in tunnel No. 2 690 feet and in tunnel No. 3 450 feet to be 
enlarged, and in addition the trimming of projecting points remains 
to be done in other portions of the tunnels. 

All of the power required for drilling and pumping purposes in 
these tunnels and for running three stone crushers has been furnished 
by the air compressors installed between the two tunnels in 1901. 

The lighting of the tunnels has been principally by gasolene lamps, 
though at times, and particularly when building masonry, acetylene 
lamps have been used with satisfactory results. 

All the motive power to transport the material excavated from the 
tunnels has been furnished by mules, except at the westerly portal 
of tunnel No. 2, where the cars are raised about 30 feet above the 
level of the tunnel to the top of the cut, on an incline operated by a 
cable and hoisting enaine. 

At the be^innino: of the season for outside work there was a serious 
delay caused by the retesting or rejection of a large quantity of the 
natural cement used on these sections. The cement used the pre- 
vious year in the concrete had not hardened in a wholly satisfactory 
manner, and cement which had been stored during the winter by the 
contractor, as well as that stored at the cement works, and shipped 
in the spring, showed much less strength on short-time tests than in 
the previous year. Arrangements were made as promptly as possible 
to get fresh and more finely ground cements, but there was a consid- 
erable delay in resuming the actual building of masonry. 

On sections 2 and 3 grading and other work pertaining to the 
construction of the aqueduct in open trench was resumed about 
April 1 ; but the actual building of masonry was not begun until 
May 1 on Section 2, and May 13 on Section 3. The work pro- 
ceeded slowly during the season, and the total length of aqueduct 
outside of tunnels completed during the year on Section 2 was 
1,729 feet and on Section 3 1,316 feet. 

There has been a considerable increase in the plant during the 
year : sand bins with a rotary screen and conveyor, operated by 
steam, have been erected at the Brewer sand pit, to supply sand for 
sections 2 and 3 ; a No. 5 Gates crusher, with conveyor, rotary 
screen, bins, etc., and run by a 50 horse-power engine, has been 
set up on the waste dump at the west end of tunnel No. 2 ; a crush- 
ing and mixing plant has also been erected at the west end of tunnel 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 135 

No. 3, — it includes a 16 horse-power engine, jaw crusher, con- 
veyor, screen, large stone bins and a 4- foot cubical mixer. These 
crushers have been operated intermittently to furnish stone as re- 
quired for the masonry in progress. 

The dimension stone headwalls for all the culverts on sections 2 
and 3 were completed early in the season. 

The proportion of the value of the work done to the full amount 
of the contract is substantially the same on each of these sections. 
At the end of the year only 69 per cent, had been completed, instead 
of 84 per cent, of the total, as required by the contract. 

On Section 6 a siiiall force was engaged during the winter months 
in making the Elm Street embankment, excavating muck from the 
swamp at the westerly end of the section and hauling bricks. Trench 
excavation and other work preparatory to masonry construction were 
actively resumed about the middle of March, and concrete masonry 
would have been started before April 1 had the cement on hand been 
acceptable. By using a leaner Portland cement concrete for the 
natural cement concrete specified, until the proper quality of natural 
cement could be obtained, the contractor besjan building concrete 
masonry on April 2. The work on this section has been carried on 
in a satisfactory manner, but the rate of progress has not been equal 
to that required by the contract, so that the deficiency noted in the 
last annual report has been slightly increased. On December 31 the 
value of the work completed w T as 70 per cent, of the total, and in 
point of time maybe said to be about six weeks behind time. There 
have been 3,135 linear feet of aqueduct built, including the whole 
of the easterly half of the section and the substructure of the siphon 
chamber; 1,383 feet remain to be built. 

The material excavated on this section has been nearly all extremely 
hard to dig, and it has consequently been difficult to excavate the 
trenches rapidly. So little excavation remains to be done that the 
work should progress more rapidly in the future. A larger propor- 
tion of the trench than was anticipated has proved suitable for the use 
of the compact earth type of aqueduct, which requires less masonry 
than the ordinary type, and it will reduce the cost of this section 
somewhat below the preliminary estimates. 

The only work of an exceptional character that has occurred on 
this section has been the excavation of peat and mud to a depth of 12 
feet where the aqueduct crosses a swamp for a distance of 250 feet. 



136 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The bottom of this excavation was in fine material, and, on account 
of the considerable quantity of water encountered, was difficult to 
excavate. The pit was refilled with earth spread in 3-inch layers, 
which were compacted by rolling, and watering if necessary, so as 
to make a suitable foundation for the aqueduct. The water was re- 
moved from the excavations by a 4-inch centrifugal pump. One 
stone crusher was run steadily, and for a part of the time a second 
crusher has been operated, to furnish stone for the concrete. 

On Section 12 work has been in progress throughout the year. 
Prior to April 1, when work was resumed on the line of the aque- 
duct, a small force had been employed in quarrying and crushing 
stone and distributing it along the line, also in hauling a supply of 
bricks for use in the work. 

In the early part of the season there was considerable delay, 
owing to a decision to adopt mechanical devices instead of hand 
work for various operations. 

Commencing with a force of 50 men, the number was gradually 
increased to 100 men in the middle of June. 

The erection of a screening and concrete mixing plant was begun 
about the middle of May, and it was ready for operation five weeks 
later. Toward the latter part of July a cableway near the easterly 
end of the section and a gravity screen near the westerly end were 
ready for operation, and the number of working points was thus 
increased to great advantage. After the work was well started the 
progress was substantially that required during the second season 
of the work, but at the end of the year the deficiency was some- 
what greater than at the end of the previous year. On December 
31 the value of the work done was 71 per cent, of the whole, and 
the work appeared to be about seven weeks behind the requirements 
of the contract. 

At the end of the year 4,413 feet of aqueduct had been completed, 
and 2,087 feet remained to be completed. The most rapid progress 
was made in October and the first half of November, when the 
average weekly rate for seven weeks was 132 feet of completed 
aqueduct. The greatest weekly rate for any week was 180 feet. 

The earthwork upon this section has generally been easily handled 
material, and much of it was gravel and sand of good quality for 
concrete. At the easterly end of the section, however, a very fine 
sand is encountered toward the bottom of the trench, and consider- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 137 

able water enters the trench at this place. The aqueduct rests on a 
double platform of 1-inch spruce boards, of which the top layer was 
fluted, extending over the entire bottom to form a dry foundation on 
which to lay the concrete. Drainage was facilitated by the flutings 
which were on the under side of the upper boards, and connected 
with a longitudinal box drain laid in the middle of the trench. The 
brick lining: of the invert was also made with two rings of bricks, 
instead of the single ring used in most places, in order to withstand 
the upward pressure of the ground water. 

On all four of these sections the skimcoating of the arch has been 
in progress, and at the end of the year about 8,600 linear feet had 
been completed. 

The maximum force employed on these sections was 437 men and 
89 horses, for the week ending September 27. 

Section 4. — Masonry Aqueduct. 

Contractor, Patrick McGovern ; date of contract, May 6, 1901 ; amount of contract, 
L,161.69; length of aqueduct, 4,150 feet; width, 10 feet. 



Work under this contract was resumed early in April, and was 
continued to completion in August, about one year earlier than the 
time required by the contract. The work was not only done ex- 
peditiously, but in a ver}' satisfactory manner. The maximum force 
employed during the year was 72 men and 11 horses, for the week 
ending May 24. 

Section 5. — Masonry Aqueduct. 

Contractor, Bruno, Salomone & Petitti ; date of contract, May 8, 1901 ; amount of con- 
tract, $129,300; length of aqueduct, 5,300 feet, including crossing under the tracks of 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad at Nohscot station ; width of aque- 
duct, 13 feet 2 inches. 

Work under this contract was resumed on March 31, and con- 
tinued throughout the year with a rate of progress well in advance 
of the requirements of the contract. The special section of aqueduct 
which crosses under the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
near the Nobscot station has been completed, and there remain but 
300 feet of aqueduct masonry to be built, for which the trench 
excavation is nearly all made. The trench excavation has been gen- 
erally harder than that of the previous year. The deep cut toward 
the westerly end of the section was nearly all through a boulder 
clay, and a small depth of ledge found in the bottom of the cut 



138 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

caused considerable delay, as the small depth and limited quantity 
did not warrant the use of steam drills. On the whole, the work 
progressed rapidly and satisfactorily. The material in the excava- 
tions has been sufficiently compact to permit the use of a greater 
length of the compact earth type of aqueduct than was considered 
probable when the preliminary estimates were made, and there will 
consequently be a corresponding reduction in the total cost of the 
section. 

In addition to the stone-crushing plant, which has continued in 
nearly constant operation, two gravity screening -plants were built 
to obtain material for the concrete. A small combined derrick and 
hoisting engine, mounted on wheels, was used to good advantage to 
handle the excavation from the deep cut west of Water Street. 

The maximum force employed on this section was 125 men and 
22 horses, for the week ending June 14. 

Sections 7 and 9. — Riveted Steel Pipe Lines, including Bridge 

over the Sudbury River. 

Contractor, Edward Kendall & Sons ; date of contract, March 8, 1902 ; amount of contract, 
$134,990 ; total length of pipe lines, 4,731 feet. 

Sections 7 and 9 comprise single lines of 7%- foot diameter riveted 
steel pipes, forming inverted siphons across the valleys of the Sud- 
bury River and Happy Hollow, respectively. Three lines of these 
pipes will ultimately be required, but one will convey about half as 
much water as the capacity of the aqueduct, and will meet the re- 
quirements for quite a long period. The pipe on Section 7 has a 
length of 3,606 feet, and that on Section 9 of 1,125 feet. 

The pipes are made in the shop in 30-foot lengths of 4 plates 
each, except where curves or other special requirements made it 
necessary to use shorter lengths. The plates are about 91 by 290 
inches in size, each plate being sufficiently long to make the full 
circumference of the pipe and a sufficient lap for riveting. The pipes 
are made with alternate large and small courses, the small courses 
having an inside diameter of 7% feet. The plates are all %e of an 
inch thick, except in the portion of the pipe which is to be built as 
a self-sustaining arch over the Sudbury River, where %-inch plates 
are used. This arch has a span of 80 feet and a rise of 5% feet, 
and springs from substantial granite-faced concrete masonry abut- 
ments. 






J 







Wi.\X. v . V 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 139 

The shop work is done at the plant of the contractor in Cambridge- 
port, the plates being furnished by the Central Iron and Steel Com- 
pany of Harrisburg, Pa. The riveting is done by hydraulic machines 
exerting a pressure of about 80 tons on each rivet. Calking is done 
with pneumatic tools. After a 30-foot section is made up, it is sub- 
jected to a water pressure of 75 pounds to a square inch, and made 
tight, after which it is dipped vertically in a bath of mineral rubber 
asphalt pipe coating, heated to a temperature of about 500° F. 
After being coated, the pipes are hauled on wagons to the railroad 
and shipped to Saxonville, where they are again loaded on a special 
wagon hauled by six horses and delivered on the work. The weight 
of a 30-foot section is about 8 tons. The pipes are delivered at 
points where they can be conveniently rolled on to a small steel- 
framed truck, running on a track laid in the trench, and are then 
hauled into place by a hoisting engine and wire cable. 

The field equipment for pipe work consists of two 25 horse-power 
upright boilers, one small Knovvles air compressor, one hoisting 
engine, track and car, an air pipe line ; two Boyer riveting machines, 
4l/2-inch stroke, running 800 strokes per minute, with pneumatic 
holding-on tool ; two Boyer calking machines, with %-inch cylinder, 
1%-inch stroke, running 1,500 strokes per minute; forges, jacks 
and small tools. Practically all the riveting and calking in the field 
have been done with pneumatic tools. 

All pipe lines before completion and acceptance are filled with 
water and made tight under a pressure equal to the maximum work- 
ing pressure when the aqueduct is in use. This has required an 
additional plant of boiler, pumps and pipe lines for short periods of 
time. 

The contractor immediately after the award of the contract ar- 
ranged with Winston & Co., who are building the adjacent sections 
8 and 10, to do all work except furnishing and laying the steel pipe. 

The Section 8 camp, which was established last year, was enlarged 
to accommodate the increased forces. Clearing was begun on April 
1, and the earthwork was prosecuted vigorously. The pipework 
on Section 9 was started first, the plant began to arrive on June 10, 
and the first section of pipe was delivered on June 30. The work 
progressed very slowly during the summer and early fall, and the 
section was not completed, tested and accepted until November 10. 
Considerable difficulty was experienced in obtaining water for test- 



140 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

ing, and, after abandoning an attempt to get water by driving wells 
near by, a pipe line about 3,000 feet long was laid to Dudley Pond, 
and the supply pumped from there. 

On Section 7 much better progress has been made with the pipe- 
work. The first pipe was set October 1, and on November 25 
1,651 feet of pipe line had been completed, tested and accepted. 
In addition, 480 feet of pipe had been laid and partially riveted when 
the season's work closed on November 29. Work on the Sudbury 
River bridge abutments was begun about the middle of August, and 
on December 1 the abutments were sufficiently advanced to receive 
the pipe bridge. The plant for, this work consisted of an 18 horse- 
power double-drum hoister, running a large derrick set up on a 
coffer-dam in the middle of the river, and a horizontal Worthington 
duplex pump for keeping the water out of the pits for the founda- 
tions. The stone and sand for concrete was obtained from the 
screening and crushing plant on Section 8. 

Blow-off from Section 9. 

Contractor, T. Bruno; date of contract, October 13, 1902; amount of contract, $2,191.94. 

In order to empty the existing and future steel pipes at Happy 
Hollow, it was necessary to provide means for conveying the water 
for a considerable distance. This was accomplished by laying under 
this contract 482 feet of 12-inch cast-iron pipe in a trench about 
10 feet deep, and 392 feet of 24-inch vitrified pipe in a trench from 
5 to 7% feet deep, and by excavating for a distance of 1,800 feet a 
ditch 1 foot wide on the bottom and generally about 2% feet deep 
and 11 feet wide on top. About 750 feet of this ditch are faced 
with a 6-inch layer of screened gravel, and about 24 feet with dry 
rubble-stone paving. These channels take the flow from the pipe 
to a small stream in the Sudbury Meadows, through which it finally 
reaches the river. 

Work was begun on October 22, carried on energetically and in 
a satisfactory manner, and completed on November 20, ten days 
ahead of the time required by the contract. The maximum force 
employed on the work was 33 men and 3 horses, for the week end- 
ing November 8. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 141 



Sections 8, 10, 11 and 15. — Masonry Aqueduct and Tunnel. 

Contractor, Winston & Co. ; date of contracts, August 28, 1901 ; amount of contracts, 
$466,419; length of aqueduct, 18,692 feet, inclusive of three siphon chambers on sec- 
tions 8 and 10, and the screen and terminal chambers and 600 feet of tunnel on Section 
15 ; width of aqueduct, 13 feet 2 inches. 

As mentioned in the last annual report, these contracts were let 
too late in the season of 1901 for much to be accomplished before 
the end of that year. No masonry was built except on Section 8, 
where about 500 linear feet of aqueduct were completed before the 
end of the season. During the winter, while making plans for the 
work, the contractor concluded that it would be advisable to use a 
much more extensive plant and more machinery than had hitherto 
been used in the construction of the aqueducts ; and he presented 
plans for a central crushing, screening and concrete mixing plant to 
be used on each section, with a system of tracks to be used for con- 
veying the materials to be screened and crushed to the central plant 
and the concrete from the central plant to working points. As the 
system adopted and the plant installed on these sections appear to 
represent an important advance as regards economy over the methods 
heretofore used, they will be described subsequently at some length. 

Sections 8 and 10 are included in one contract, but, as the plant 
set up on Section 8 could not be moved to Section 10 so as to begin 
work on that section before cold weather, the contractor has not 
attempted to do much more than complete the work on Section 8 
this year, leaving the bulk of the work v on Section 10 for the coming 
year. 

On Section 8 all of the masonry, comprising the substructures of 
two siphon chambers and 3,413 linear feet of aqueduct, has been built. 
The earthwork is well advanced, though considerable yet remains to 
be done towards widening embankments to their full width and 
covering them with loam. 

On Section 10 the ground has been cleared of trees and brush, all 
the depressions below the grade of the aqueduct have been filled with 
suitable material carefully compacted to form a firm foundation for 
the masonry, all the cast-iron pipe culverts have been laid, and the 
grading for the construction railroad has been nearly finished. This 
preliminary work represents a small proportion of the total value 
of the work, but it makes it possible to make rapid progress the 
coming season. 



142 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



On Section 11 the route of the aqueduct was cleared during the 
winter and the logs were hauled to a sawmill and converted into ties 
and lumber for use in the work. About March 1 the contractor 
leased buildings and land from Francis Shaw, near the crossing of 
the aqueduct and electric railway, and proceeded to build quarters 
for men and stock, establishing his central camp at this place. Early 
in April, as soon as the weather would permit, a large force of men 
and teams began the work of excavation and embankment, the work 
being done with special reference to preparing a road-bed for 4,000 
feet of double-track construction railroad. The work of providing 
and erecting machinery was also -pushed forward as rapidly as pos- 
sible ; but, owing to delays which often occur in the delivery of 
machineiy, the plant was not ready for use until June 24. Among 
other causes which contributed somewhat to the delay was the burn- 
ing, on the night of May 17, of a house used by the contractor as 
an office and storehouse, causing a total loss of a full stock of 
shovels, tools, harnesses, cordage, blocks and other supplies. After 
the plant was ready to operate, the work was carried on so expedi- 
tiously that 3,951 linear feet of aqueduct were completed on Decem- 
ber 5, when the cold weather made it necessary to cease work. 
Grading operations were continued until the end of the year, and 
the embankments over this portion of the work were nearly com- 
pleted. It is the intention to move the crushing, screening and 
mixing plant during the winter to a point toward the westerly end 
of Section 11, where it can be used for building not only the re- 
maining 2,650 linear feet of aqueduct to be built on Section 11, but 
also a portion of the aqueduct on Section 10. On the westerly por- 
tion of Section 11, as well as on the easterly portion of Section 10, 
substantially all the preparatory grading has been done, so that rapid 
progress should be made as soon as the weather permits the resump- 
tion of work in the spring. 

On Section 15 some excavation from rock cuts and the tunnel 
proceeded without serious interruption during the winter. The 
excavation of the tunnel, 600 feet in length, was started on January 
9, and the heading, which was driven entirely from the easterly 
end, was completed May 2, when the work was discontinued, leav- 
ing 192 feet of bench to be excavated at times during the summer 
when the rock could be conveniently used at the crusher. The same 
general conditions which prevented an early start on the construe- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 143 

tion of the masonry on Section 11 existed on Section 15, and it was 
not until May 23 that the construction of the aqueduct was begun. 
The masonry work has been confined to the easterly half of the sec- 
tion, and 2,844 linear feet of aqueduct and about two- thirds of the 
substructure of the terminal chamber had been built before cold 
weather compelled a cessation of work on December 5. The greater 
part of the trench has been dug through massive ledges of granite 
and trap rock, and the progress has necessarily been slow. The 
earth on this section also has been very hard to dig. Progress on 
the brick lining was greatly retarded for some weeks by the failure 
to secure a sufficient number of brick masons, and this in turn pre- 
vented the building of the arch and the grading of the embankments. 
This contract includes some excavation and shore protection at, and 
the construction of a portion of the dam of, the Weston Reservoir. 
About half of this work has been done. 

The value of the work done on all these contracts has been much 
less than the amount stipulated in the contracts, as at the end of the 
year the value of the work performed on sections 8 and 10 was 55 
per cent., on Section 11 64 per cent., and on Section 15 57 per 
cent, of the total ; while the amounts required by the contracts at 
that time were, respectively, 80, 80 and 82 per cent. With the 
methods employed, however, the providing of the plant was an 
important part of the work, and rapid progress should be made on 
all sections during the coming year. Ou Section 15, as already 
stated, the excavation has been difficult ; but on the other sections it 
has generally been excellent, and has furnished a large proportion of 
excellent concrete stock. Xo water has been found in the trenches 
on any of the sections. 

The maximum force employed on these sections was 399 men and 
93 horses, for the week ending September 20. 

Plant. 

The main purpose in arranging the plant on these sections has 
been to so plan the work that large mechanical concrete mixers 
could be used to good advantage ; ' but on Section 1 1 , where a large 
amount of good sand and gravel would be available from the exca- 
vations, it was also the purpose to bring suitable material from all 
parts of the trench to the screening and crushing plant. 

In order to transport the concrete quickly and all materials eco- 



144 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

nomically, it was necessary to use cars and tracks for transportation 
instead of carts. 

The plant on Section 11 is somewhat more complete than on other 
sections, and will be described in some detail. The central feature 
is the crushing, screening and mixing plant (shown by the accom- 
panying illustration), which was compactly arranged with the neces- 
sary engines and boilers, in the middle of the easterly 4,000 feet of 
the section. The section includes much sidehiil work, and by build- 
ing the aqueduct embankment on its lower side about to the top of 
the sidewalls a road-bed was furnished much of the way for a double- 
track railroad. For the remainder of the distance the road-bed was 
provided by cutting through the higher ground to a sufficient width 
for the tracks. The grading for the tracks required a large amount 
of work, but nearly all was work required under the contract. The 
tracks were 3-foot gage, laid with 30-pound rails. The cars were 
hauled in part by mules and in part by a 7-ton locomotive. 

At the central plant large bins for sand and broken stone or 
screened gravel, supported by heavy framed timbers, were built at 
a proper elevation to allow these materials to run from the bins to 
the mixing platform, thence into the concrete mixer, from which the 
concrete was dumped into steel dump cars of triangular section. A 
large derrick, fitted with a bull wheel and with a boom of sufficient 
length to reach well above the bins, lifted " skips" loaded with 
stone for the crusher to a low platform just at the level of the top 
of a No. 5 Austin crusher, or with gravel to be screened, to the top 
of inclined stationary screens. The stone was fed to the crusher by 
attendants and discharged into an elevator which lifted it to the top 
of the bins, where it entered a rotary screen, and the acceptable 
material dropped into the stone bin, while the rejected large stones 
ran through a shute to be again crushed. The material dumped on 
the stationary screens was separated so that the sand was discharged 
into a bin beneath, screened gravel of suitable size into an elevator 
which carried it to the stone bin, and the larger stones at the mouth 
of the crusher. As the sand bin beneath the inclined screen was 
too low to deliver its contents directly to the measuring platform, 
such sand as was suitable for the concrete was permitted to drop into 
" skips" on cars run under the bin, the " skips" being hoisted by the 
main derrick and dumped into the main sand bin. Surplus or un- 
suitable sand was similarly dropped into cars or carts and hauled to 
the embankments. The cement was hoisted in large quantities at a 




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tfo. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 145 

time by the derrick to the platform over the mixer. This platform 
was about 16 feet square, and gave room for the three men employed 
there as well as storage space for a supply of cement. The large 
conical hopper connected with the mixer below was set with its top 
flush with the platform. This hopper could be closed by a swing- 
ing door at the bottom. The proper quantity of stone was run 
directly into the hopper and levelled off to a guide mark on the 
sides, then the proper number of bags of cement was emptied and 
spread over the stone. The sand was measured by drawing it into 
a measuring box hung on trunnions and then tipped into the hopper 
and spread evenly over the cement, after which the whole charge 
was dropped into the mixer. Water was measured by a small steel 
tank fitted with a glass gage, and was admitted to the mixer by pipe 
connections through the hollow shaft on which the mixer revolved. 
The batches as mixed contained about 30 cubic feet of coucrete. 
From 25 to 30 revolutions of the mixer were required to be made, 
after which the concrete was discharged into the steel car for trans- 
portation to the work. 

For masonry in the bottom of the trench it was possible, by means 
of steel shutes, to dump the concrete from the car directly into the 
trench. For masonry in the sidewalls and arch the concrete was 
first dumped from the car to a platform and then rehandled into 
place with shovels and wheelbarrows. 

Under favorable conditions the daily capacity of one of these 
mixing plants was about 150 cubic yards, but the quantity actually 
placed in the work w r as ordinarily not much more than 100 cubic 
yards per day. 

For the excavation of a part of the trench a travelling derrick was 
used, which lifted the " skips" after they had been loaded to flat 
cars to be hauled to the central plant, if the material was suitable 
for concrete, otherwise to be hauled to another travelling derrick 
which dumped them upon the embankment over the arch. 

During the latter part of the season, after this plant had been 
operated for a sufficient time to give the necessary experience, the 
aqueduct was built very rapidly. The average rate of progress for 
nine weeks at this time was 216 feet per week, and the greatest 
progress in any one week was 270 feet. 

On Section 8, where there was very little excavation from the 
aqueduct trench, and excellent opportunities for obtaining large 
quantities of suitable material for the concrete from borrow pits 



146 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

near the central plant, the material was all hauled to it by teams* 
and a single track along the line of the aqueduct was used to convey 
the concrete from the plant to the work. 

On Section 15, where there was very little if any sand or gravel, 
the plant was located near the middle of the section, and near a 
large pile of rock which had been excavated from the tunnel. In 
this case, also, only a single track was required to carry the concrete 
from the plant to the work ; but, in addition, the ground was so 
rough that it was necessary to build a road for carts the full length 
of the section. 

The successful use of so much machinery in building aqueducts 
is largely dependent upon the continuity of operations, a stoppage 
at any point affecting the whole work. On these sections, while 
there have been some delays by the breakage of important portions 
of the machinery, the work has been carried on so as to make very 
good progress. At the plant on Section 8, where there was very 
little stone to break, and it was necessary to depend almost wholly 
upon the screening of gravel, there was considerable delay in wet 
weather on account of the difficulty of screening wet material. At 
Section 11 there was sufficient stone, so that the progress was not 
materially interrupted by the wet weather. 

The quality of the product obtained from the cubical mixer is 
better than that obtained by thorough hand mixing ; but, as there 
is a tendency toward the separation of the materials when dumped 
from cars, on account of the large stones falling out first without a 
fair proportion of mortar with them, and as the quantity of concrete 
supplied by the mixer is so large in proportion to the size of the 
structures in which the concrete is placed that it is difficult to place 
it properly as fast as it comes to the work, the final results are little 
if any better than those obtained by hand mixing, and continual 
watchfulness on the part of the inspectors is required in order to 
get even as good work. 

Section 13. — Masonry Aqueduct and Tunnel. 

Contractor, Columbus Construction Company, successor to Michael H. Keefe ; date of 
contract, May 20, 1901; amount of contract, $403,000; length of aqueduct, 7,300 feet, 
of which 5,686 feet are tunnel and 53 feet are open channel ; width of aqueduct, 13 
feet 2 inches. 

Work in the tunnel has been continued day and night throughout 
the year, subject only to interruptions of about three days each at 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. / 147 

the Fourth of July and Christinas holidays. At the end of the pre- 
vious year the tunnel had been excavated for 530 feet at the westerly 
end and 471 feet at the easterly end, and the amount of progress, 
largely on account of conditions stated in the last report, was 559 
feet less than the contract requirements at that time. The condi- 
tions met with in the first 530 feet of tunnelling from the west end, 
caused by the lower half of the tunnel being in ledge and the upper 
half in earth, were also described in the last annual report. These 
conditions continued until about the middle of April, when the ledge 
rose above the roof of the tunnel, and the full section has been in 
rock since that time. The length excavated through this difficult 
portion has been 400 feet. From time to time the strength of the 
timbers used to support the roof was found to be inadequate, par- 
ticularly of the timbers first put in. Many of them crushed and 
sagged, and had to be braced with props or reinforced by additional 
sets. The first timbers used were a cap and two batter posts 8 
inches square, set from 4 to 5 feet between centres; later, 10-inch 
by 10-inch timbers were used, and finally 10-inch by 12-inch hard 
pine timbers. During the latter part of the time also 3-inch planks 
were used for lagging. For the last 300 feet wall plates were used 
as a footing for the batter posts. 

Early in January the excessive settlement of the timbers at places 
emphasized the necessity of immediately building the masonry lining 
through some of the worst portions ; and to meet this exigency the 
contractor was permitted to use brickwork instead of concrete for 
about 75 feet, as his preparations for the latter class of work were 
far from ready. Brickwork was also better adapted to these places, 
because many timbers obstructed the work and had to be moved, and 
this could be done with greater safety by building the arch in very 
short sections, which was not practicable with concrete. 

The contractor was strongly urged to hasten the trimming of the 
tunnel and other preparations for concrete work, but these proceeded 
very slowly. Scarcity of labor and slow delivery of equipment were 
given as reasons for the delay, and the placing of concrete was not 
started until May 12. Before the concrete was placed throughout 
the whole of the timbered portion of the tunnel it was necessary to 
use props to support the timbers in many places, and for consider- 
able lengths to retimber the tunnel. The progress of the portion of 
the tunnel where timbering was required was necessarily retarded, 



148 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc, 

and even after this portion of the tunnel had been passed and the ex- 
cavation was wholly in rock, the trimming of the tunnel, retimbering 
and masonry construction impeded the progress somewhat. Not- 
withstanding these difficulties, the earnest efforts of the contractor 
have resulted in a progress in tunnel excavation somewhat in excess 
of that specified for the year 1902, as the deficiency of 559 feet at 
the end of 1901 was reduced to 463 feet at the end of 1902. This 
deficiency in the amount of tunnel excavation is in comparison with 
the progress required by the contract, but, as an additional two 
months has been allowed' the contractor for the completion of the 
contract, on account of the difficulties met with in the westerly drift 
of the tunnel, it cannot be said that there is any deficiency in the 
progress of the excavation at the present time. 

The total length of tunnel excavated to December 31 was 4,903 
linear feet, of which 2,278 feet are in the west drift and 2,625 feet 
in the east drift. The average weekly progress for the year 1902 
has been 75 feet. 

The amount of concrete lining built at the end of the year was 
1,414 feet, all in the west drift of the tunnel ; and thus far only the 
sides and arch have been built, the invert being left until such time 
as the tracks can be taken up. The progress of the concrete lining 
is far behind the requirements of the contract. 

The tunnel excavation has been through massive granite and 
diorite formations, which vary locally in structure and hardness. 
When seamy and blocky the rock has been troublesome to drill, and 
when hard it has required a large amount of powder to blast it. 

The quantity of water draining into the tunnel is comparatively 
small, although sufficient to drain wells and springs in its vicinity. 

After March 1, as the weather became warmer, delays due to the 
smoke of the powder remaining in the heading, owing to poor venti- 
lation, became frequent, especially in the easterly drift, and the con- 
tractor was advised to resort to artificial ventilation. A quantity of 
10-inch galvanized sheet-iron pipe and two blowers with electric 
motors were ordered. The arrival of this apparatus was very much 
delayed, so that the ventilation remained defective for a long time. 
Some advantage, however, had been derived in the mean time from 
the use of another form of explosive, which generated less gas and 
smoke. 

At the westerly end of the section, where there was only a short 



No. 57. ] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 149 

length of aqueduct to be built in open trench, a derrick was set up 
and excavation begun early in June, and three weeks later the first 
invert was laid. This work progressed very slowly, as the aque- 
duct was extended in short stretches, so that the excavation and 
back-filling should both be within reach of the derrick ; and it re- 
quired nearly the whole season to build the 236 feet of aqueduct 
which could be built without encroaching on the space required for 
the operations at the tunnel. The trench was about 15 feet deep, 
and, as there was considerable water in it, constant pumping was 
necessary. A double board platform with central box drain and a 
brick invert two rings in thickness wene used, as described for the 
easterly end of Section 12. 

Only 162 feet of aqueduct remain to be built at the westerly end 
of the section. At the easterly end there are 1,100 linear feet of 
aqueduct and a substructure of a channel chamber to be built in a 
very deep trench, much of which is to be excavated in rock. On 
account of the large amount of work, many requests were made ot 
the contractor to make an early start upon this portion of the work, 
but there has been much delay. 

Preliminary work on the plant began about the middle of July, 
but actual excavation at the easterly end of the section was not under 
way until August 9. After this date the work progressed very 
slowly,- and the trench was not completed at any place until the very 
end of the season, when it was too late to build much masonry. A 
16-foot length, however, was built before the cold weather required 
the cessation of work. The backward condition of this portion of the 
work will make it necessary to use very energetic efforts to complete 
the work within a reasonable time. The contractor has been asked 
to continue the work of excavation through the winter. 

At the end of the year the work to be done comprised about 24,000 
cubic yards of excavation from a trench 900 feet long, having a depth 
of 30 feet, and the construction of the aqueduct and the substructure 
of the channel chamber. 

During the year the following additions have been made to the 
plant : two large derricks and hoisting engines ; an inclined track, 
operated by hoister and cable, has been substituted for the derrick 
at the east portal ; another 125 horse-power boiler has been added 
to the compressor plant ; and two No. 4 Austin crushers, with con- 
veyors, screens, etc., all run by 30 horse-power electric motors. 



150 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

One crusher is located near each end of the tunnel, and is provided 
with an elevated stone bin and a sheltered mixing platform and sand 
bins. Steam pipes pass through the sand bins for use in freezing 
weather. 

The maximum force employed on this section was 229 men and 
13 horses, for the week ending October 25. 

Section 14, Open Channel. — Sections 1 and 2, Weston Reservoir. 

Contractor, Nawn & Brock ; date of contracts, November 26, 1901 ; amount of contracts, 
$206,370 ; length of three sections, 5,347 feet, including about 1,347 feet of open chan- 
nel, 66.6 acres of reservoir and channel, and an earth dam 900 feet long with concrete 
corewall. 

The contractor entered on the work early in March, but the re- 
mainder of that month was consumed in the erection of camp build- 
ings, and the actual work of construction was not started until April 
1. The organization of forces, preliminary work of road building, 
track laying and installation of plant went on slowly, so that com- 
paratively little was done until late in May. During this time, and 
pending the delivery of the steam shovel, gangs of men were em- 
ployed in clearing and burning brush, grubbing stumps, stripping 
loam from portions of the reservoir site and storing same in piles 
for future use, grading a temporary relocation of Ash Street, making 
a paved drainage ditch on the north side of the open channel and 
reservoir, stripping ledge and preparing foundation for the core- 
wall at the dam, and making excavations from the reservoir with 
men and teams. A new steam shovel which had been promised 
some weeks earlier was not ready for operation until May 28, when 
it was put to work near the easterly limits of Section 1 . 

Brief observation of the daily working of this shovel showed that 
it could not make the desired rate of progress, and the contractor 
was advised to adopt some other measures to increase his output. 
He decided to provide a second steam shovel, and no time was lost 
in ordering the same, but it was not put into commission until late 
in September. The output for each of these shovels for the period 
they have been working has averaged about 500 cubic yards for ten 
hours, which falls far short of the amount necessary to advance the 
work at the rate stipulated. 

On Section 14 the open channel and reservoir excavation are well 
advanced. The material from the excavations is being deposited in 
extensive mounds, designed by Olmsted Brothers, landscape archi- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 151 

-tects, which are to be regraded to required contours and covered 
with loam, so that they will resemble natural mounds. The mound 
north of the open channel will cover 9% acres to an average depth 
of 5 feet, and the highest point will be 20 feet above the natural 
surface of the ground. It is designed to contain about 80,000 cubic 
yards. Material from Section 14 has been dumped at this place, and 
the mound is very nearly half made. All the loam has been removed 
from the site of this mound. Some of it had to be stored in spoil 
banks to be rehandled, but by careful management it has been pos- 
sible to spread as much as half of the loam directly in place with 
only one handling. 

The smaller filling north of the reservoir and east of Ash Street 
has been completed with material excavated mostly from Section 14. 
This fill covers 5 acres, has an average depth of 3 feet and contains 
27,000 cubic yards. None of the soil beneath it was removed, as 
there was sufficient soil dressing from the reservoir which could be 
hauled directly to place. 

Nothing has been done on the ground toward the stone arched 
bridge over the open channel at Ash Street. The paved drainage 
ditches are very nearly completed, 2,900 linear feet having been 
built. 

The value of the work done on this section was 54 per cent, of 
the total value, which was only about two-thirds of the amount 
required by the contract. 

On Section 1 the total excavation is estimated to be 230,000 cubic 
yards, of which only 37,000 cubic yards had been made at the end 
of the year. This material has gone mainly into the large mound 
to be built on the south side of the reservoir, and which when fin- 
ished will contain 210,000 cubic yards. At the end of the year 
only 17 per cent, of the total value of the work had been finished, 
where 79 per cent, was required. 

On Section 2 70,000 cubic yards of soil stripping and excavation 
had been done, out of a total estimated amount of 177,000 cubic 
yards. This excavation has been placed in two small embankments 
south of the reservoir, which are now substantially completed ; in 
the small embankment at Cooper Cove on the north side of the res- 
ervoir ; and in the embankment of the dam. About 1,100 feet of 
shore line have been dressed to slopes, and riprap placed upon 
them. 



152 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The work done on the dam includes the removal of earth and 
loose materials so as to expose the ledge for a width of 25 feet and 
length of 700 feet along the line of the core wall, preparing the 
foundation of the corewall and inner portion of the earth dam by 
removing all loose and seamy rock from immediately under the 
corewall, and by carefully scraping and washing out the seams over 
the whole width of exposed ledge, then filling the seams with rich 
Portland cement mortar, and finally coating the whole surface of 
the ledge with a cement wash. The 16-inch cast-iron waste pipe 
from the lowest part of the dam has been laid. The corewall has 
been partly built for a length of 439 feet. For 233 feet of this 
length, including the deepest portions of the dam, the top of the 
corewall is up to elevation 185.5, which is 14.5 feet below full res- 
ervoir level, and for the remaining 206 feet is up to elevation 192. 
The portions of the earth dam on both sides of the corewall, w T hich, 
by the specifications, are to be built of selected materials spread in 
layers, wet and rolled, have been built about to the same elevations 
as the corewall. Considerable filling has been done in the portions 
of jthe dam where, to increase its thickness and give it the form re- 
quired by the plans of the landscape architects, much waste material 
and loam are to be dumped. 

The excavation for the concrete drain 4 feet in width and height 
along the northerly shore of the reservoir was begun about the 
middle of June. The first concrete was laid July 2, and the work 
was continued until late in November, when 1,374 linear feet had 
been built. The material through which the trench for the drain 
w T as excavated was very hard, a large part of it being ledge. Across 
Cooper Cove a rolled embankment had to be built to make a foun- 
dation for the drain. There remain 893 feet of drain to be built. 

On December 31, 43 per cent, in value of the work on Section 2 
had been done, which w T as about half the amount required at this 
time by the contract. 

Although the work on these three sections has at all times been 
far below the requirements of the contracts, the contractor was not 
urged very strongly during the summer and autumn to increase his 
force, because it w T as known that he had a very large organization 
at the Wachusett Reservoir on work which would be substantially 
finished at the end of the year, and that on the completion of that 
work he could increase very much the organization at the Weston 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



153 



Reservoir, where there is abundant opportunity for working a large 
force. At the end of the year, however, the work was so seriously 
behind time that much more activity must be shown to finish the 
work as soon as required. 

In addition to the two 45-ton Souther steam shovels before men- 
tioned, the principal items of plant upon these sections have been 
as follows : 3 12-ton and 1 6-ton locomotives, 40 dump cars of 3 
cubic yards capacity, 2 miles of track laid with 30-pound rails, 8,600 
feet of wrought-iron pipe from 1 to 2 inches in diameter, 1 derrick 
and hoisting engine and a gasolene engine and pump. 

The maximum force employed on these sections was 237 men and 
36 horses, for the week ending July 5. 

Siiperstructiwes of Siphon and Gaging Chambers. 

Contractor, Norcross Brothers Company ; date of contract, December 18, 1902 ; amount of 

contract, $27,352. 

These superstructures are to be built of stone. The superstructures 
of the siphon chambers are located at the ends of the Sudbury River 
and Happy Hollow siphons, and of the gaging chambers on sections 
2 and 5 of the aqueduct. Under the terms of the contract the con- 
tractor is not required to begin the erection of these buildings before 
April 10, 1903, although it is expected that the necessary prepara- 
tory work will be done during the winter and early spring. 

Work Done and Materials Used. 

The principal items of work done and to be done in the construc- 
tion of the Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir are given in the follow- 
ing table : — 



ITEM. 


Total 

Estimated 

Amount 

(Cubic 

Yards). 


During 

1901 

(Cubic 

Yards). 


During 

1902 
(Cubic 
Yards). 


To 
Dec 31, 

1902 
(Cubic 
Yards). 


Remaining 

to be done 

Dec. 31, 1902 

(Cubic 

Yards). 


Earth excavation, 






1,641,100 


248,950 


660,910 


909,860 


731,240 


Rock excavation, ... 






55,270 


6,020 


20,700 


26,720 


28,550 


Tunnel excavation, . 






62,700 


7,780 


46,120 


53,900 


8,800 


Natural cement concrete, 






77,890 


16,160 


35,712 


51,872 


26,018 


Portland cement concrete, 






75,820 


9,652 


31,983 


41,635 


34,185 


Brick masonry, 






15,970 


3,217 


7,103 


, 10,320 


5,650 


Ashlar and dimension masonry, 






606 


8 


237 


245 


361 



154 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The following materials have been used during the year : — 

Natural cement (barrels), 55,027 

Portland cement (barrels), 45,613 

Bricks 3,739,000 

Sanitary Inspection. 
In May, two physicians, Dr. L. M. Palmer of South Framingham 
and Dr. Horace B. Frost of Weston, were appointed as medical in- 
spectors. Dr. Palmer was assigned to the portion of the line west 
of the Sudbury River, and Dr. Frost to the portion east of the Sud- 
bury River. They inspected the contractors' camps once a week, and 
as a result of their visits there was a considerable sanitary improve- 
ment at all of the camps. 

Engineering. 
The greater part of the time of the engineering assistants has 
been spent in the field, directing and supervising the work under 
construction. There has been, however, a small office force at the 
Saxonville office to attend to the drafting and other office work of 
the department. Some preliminary engineering work was required 
to prepare for the laying of the steel pipe lines and the blow-off 
from the steel pipe at Section 9. It has been necessary to make 
many detailed plans in connection with the construction of the 
work, also plans for the modification of highway crossings in Way- 
land. Considerable work has also been done in the preparation of 
record plans. The testing of cement has continued to be an impor- 
tant part of the work of this department, and has been in progress 
throughout the year. The force employed for this work has con- 
sisted of two cement testers and a third man for collecting samples ; 
in addition, for several months during the busiest portion of the sea- 
son a fourth man was stationed at the cement works in Binnewater, 
N. Y., to sample cement in advance of shipment, thus causing less 
delav for testing cement after it arrived at the work, and to some 
extent preventing the shipment of unacceptable cement to the work. 
During the year 692 carloads of cement, containing 102,350 barrels, 
were received and tested, and about 27,000 briquettes were made 
for this purpose. Four brands of Portland and two of natural 
cement have been furnished by the contractors and used during the 
year. A summary of all cement tests made upon the aqueduct to 
the end of the year is given in Appendix No. 2. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 155 



DISTRIBUTION DEPARTMENT. 

Dexter Brackett, Department Engineer. 

The work of this department comprises the construction, mainte- 
nance and operation of the pipes, distributing reservoirs, pumping 
stations and all other works in the Metropolitan Water District, 
with the exception of Chestnut Hill Reservoir and the grounds about 
it, and the Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts. 

During the past year the work of the department has been under 
the direct charge of the following assistants : — 

William E. Foss, division engineer, has had charge of the engi- 
neering work connected with the construction of Bear Hill Reser- 
voir, and of the laying of 48-inch and 60-inch pipes from the terminal 
chamber of the Weston Aqueduct through Weston, Newton and 
Brighton. He has also been in charge of investigations relating to 



the electrolysis of water pipes. 

John L. Howard, division engineer, has had charge of the engi- 
neering work in connection with the laying of 48-inch and 60-inch 
pipes in Medford, and until July 9 was in charge of the laying of 
48-inch pipes in Brighton, near the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. He 
has also made surveys and investigations in relation to the improve- 
ment of Spot Pond Brook, and has done the engineering work in 
connection with raising the 36-inch pipes in Somerville at the 
crossing of the Mystic River. 

Caleb M. Saville, division engineer, has had charge of the engi- 
neering work in connection with the Forbes Hill water tower, and 
the laying of 1.7 miles of 12-inch pipe in Hyde Park for supplying 
the high-service district in the town of Milton. He has also been 
in charge of studies relating to the use and waste of water in the 
Metropolitan District, and to the installation of Venturi meters. 

Alfred O. Doane, division engineer, has continued in charge of 
the engineering work connected with the maintenance and operation 
of the pumping stations and pipe lines. 

John W. Lynch, engineer of pumping stations, has continued in 
direct charge of the pumping stations at Chestnut Hill, and has had 
general supervision of the mechanical work at the other stations. 

George E. Wilde, assistant superintendent, has had charge of the 
maintenance and operation of the pipe lines, reservoirs and other 
works in the Distribution Department, with the exception of the 



15(5 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



pumping stations. The force employed under his direction, in addi- 
tion to the ordinary maintenance work, set 24 Venturi meters, 
relaid 1,135 feet of 16-inch pipe in Revere, and raised 520 feet of 
36-inch pipe at the crossing of the Mystic River. 

Frank E. Fuller, an engineer employed for four years as assistant 
to Mr. Doane, was granted leave of absence in December, 1901, in 
order that he might take a sea voyage for the benefit of his health. 
The voyage did not prove of benefit, and he died at Santa Cruz on 
the island of Teneriffe on August 1. He was a very faithful and 
able assistant. 

The engineering force, including inspectors, numbered 23 at the 
beginning of the year, was gradually increased to 38 during the 
summer, and at the close of the year numbered 30. 

During the year the Bear Hill Reservoir and the water tower at 
Forbes Hill in Quincy have been completed. There have been laid 
3.06 miles of 48-inch and 60-inch pipes, completing the second pipe 
line between Chestnut Hill pumping station and Spot Pond ; 5.45 
miles of 48-inch and 60-inch pipes, as a portion of a line connecting 
the new Weston Aqueduct with existing pipes near Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir, and 1.7 miles of 12-inch pipes for the purpose of sup- 
plying water to the high-service district of Milton. Twenty-four 
Venturi meters have been set on the connections through which 
water is supplied to several of the cities and towns in the District. 

Pipes, Special Castings and Valves. 
The following table gives the number of tons of pipes and special 
castings purchased during the year : — 





Diameter of Pipes (in Inches). 


Special 
Castings. 




60 


48 


16 


12 


10 


8 4 


United States Cast Iron Pipe and 

Foundry Company. 
Camden Iron Works, 

Warren Foundry and Machine 
Company. 

Taunton Locomotive Manufactur- 
ing Company. 

The George F. Blake Manufactur- 
ing Company. 

Davis & Faruum Manufacturing 
Company. 


4,837.16 


13,266.69 


11.20 
42.88 


530.61 


8.18 


7.79 


7.42 

_ 


265.74 

342.12 

58.03 

36.06 

224.03 
21.83 




4,837.16 


13,266.69 


54.08 


530.61 


8.18 


7.79 


7.42 


947.81 



Total, 18,711.93 tons pipe; 947.81 tons special castings. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



157 



Of the above, about 1,018.83 tons of pipes and 407.76 tons of 
special castings were used in connection with the work of the 
Wachusett Dam and Reservoir and Weston Aqueduct. 

Valves have been purchased during the year as follows : — 





Size of Valves (in Inches). 






48 


36 30 


24 


16 


12 


10 


8 


6 


4 


Total. 


Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, . 
The George F. Blake Manufacturing Company, . 


8 
2* 

10 


10 
10 


2* 
2 


8 

S 
16 


26 

6 

32 


43 
15 

58 


9 
2 

11 


12 

2 

14 


1 
1 


5 
8 

13 


42 
86 
39 




167 



* Sluice gates. 

All of the 48-inch, 30-inch and 24-inch valves and sluice gates, 
together with a few of the smaller valves, were used at the Wachu- 
sett Dam or in connection with the W x eston Aqueduct. 

All pipes, castings and valves have been carefully inspected at 
the several places of manufacture. 

For the convenient delivery of pipes to be used on the new pipe 
line from the Weston Aqueduct, a yard for receiving, storing and 
delivering pipes was established and is still in use near the Wood- 
land station on the circuit branch of the Boston & Albany Railroad, 
on land belonging to the railroad company. 

Pipe Laying. 

During the year 10.6 miles of pipes have been laid, making a 
total of 82.09 miles now owned and operated by the Board in con- 
nection with the Distribution System. 

Nearly all of the pipe laying has been done under the following 
contracts made during the year : — 



CONTRACTOR. 


Work and Location. 


Date of 
Contract. 


Value of 
Work done 
December 
31. 


C E. Trumbull & Co., 


Section 12, low-service pipe line, Medford, . 


April 3, 


$44,431 59 


Coleman Bros., . 


Section 12, low. service pipe line, Medford, . 


May 2, 


56,093 32 


D.F. O'Connell, . 


Section 2, supply pipe line, Newton, .... 


April 7, 


70,100 00 


T. F. Moore, 


Section 4, supply pipe line, Brighton and Newton, 


April 18, 


26,600 00 


Ward & Cummings, . 


Section 1, supply pipe line, Weston and Newton, 


July 26, 


24,300 00 


T.Bruno, 


Section 30, southern extra high-service pipe line, Hyde 
Park. 


April 28, 


7,602 81 



158 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Loic-service Pipe Line, Section 12. 

Under contracts made with C. E. Trumbull & Co. and Coleman 
Brothers, the 48-inch pipe line laid in 1897 from the Chestnut Hill 
pumping station to the old Boston Water Works mains near Tufts 
College in Medford has been extended to Spot Pond, so that there 
are now two large mains between Spot Pond and the District. 

C. E. Trumbull & Co. laid 10,088 feet of 48-inch pipes between 
the end of the old main near Tufts College, through College Avenue, 
Summer and Walnut streets to South Street Court, and through 
Governors Avenue and other private property and the Middlesex 
Fells Reservation to a point not far from the junction of Forest 
Street, Fellsway West and the Border Road. Through South Street 
Court and across the Mystic River, for a distance of 439 feet, the 
pipes were laid in 1897. Work on this contract was commenced 
April 14. On July 3 pipe laying south of the Mystic River was 
finished, and on September 30 that north of the river. The pipes 
were carried over the Boston & Maine Railroad at College Avenue on 
a pipe bridge built in 1898, when the 20-inch pipe line was laid for 
supplying the high-service district in Somerville and Medford. At 
the time when plans were made and the contract was let for laying 
the 48-inch pipes, plans for laying out an extension of Governors 
Avenue as a public street were under consideration by the city gov- 
ernment of Medford. The location of the proposed pipe line was 
through this extension of the street, and the line and grade of the 
pipes were fixed with reference to the proposed line of the new 
street, with the expectation that the street would be laid out before 
the work of pipe laying began. Action of the city government of 
Medford was delayed ; and, in order that the contractor might pro- 
ceed with his work, a taking was made on June 24 of the right to 
lay the pipes in a strip of land 20 feet wide. The street was laid 
out by the city government on July 17, and the surplus material 
from the pipe trench has been left on the ground for use in con- 
structing the new street. In order to secure room for laying the 
48-inch pipe, it was found necessary to relay 600 feet of 4-inch 
water pipe in Walnut Street, belonging to the Medford Water De- 
partment, and about 1,100 feet of 4-inch gas pipe in College Avenue 
and George Street. 

Between the terminus of the pipe line laid by C. E. Trumbull & 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 159 

Co. and the southern gate-house at Spot Pond, Coleman Brothers 
have laid a line of 60-inch pipes 6,084 feet in length. For a dis- 
tance of 1,500 feet from the connection with the 48-inch pipes this 
pipe line is laid in a northeasterly direction through the Middlesex 
Fells. It then passes through Forest Street for 500 feet to its 
junction with Elm Street, then through the property of the city of 
Medford, passing under the easterly end of the dam at Wright's 
Pond and through the pond, which was emptied to facilitate the 
work, and then through the property of the Commonwealth to a 
point about 200 feet south of the gate-house at Spot Pond, where 
it connects with pipes previously laid. The pipes laid in Wright's 
Pond are covered for a distance of 1,500 feet by an embankment 
protected with a facing of stone, the top of which will be 5 feet 
below the surface of the water when the pond is full. Between 
Wright's Pond and the end of pipes previously laid near the gate- 
house at Spot Pond the trench was very largely in rock, and for a 
considerable part of the distance was from 15 to 22 feet in depth. In 
order to provide for the laying of a second line of pipe in the future, 
the trench, where excavated in rock, has been made 16 feet wide. 
The total amount of rock excavation was about 9,750 cubic yards. 
The completion of the work has been delayed by unfavorable 
weather, and on January 1 lacked four days of completion, but the 
whole length of the line has been included in the mileage for the 
year 1902. The work is completed, with the exception of filling 
over the pipes and sloping and loaming the sides of the trench 
through the deep cutting near Spot Pond. 

In excavating the trench through the dam at Wright's Pond it was 
discovered that the concrete corewall of the dam had not been car- 
ried down to the rock when the dam was built. Two lines of pipe 
were laid through the dam, and after they were in position the core- 
wall was rebuilt and carried down to solid rock for the full width of 
the trench. The corewall was also reinforced on each side, making 
it 6 feet in thickness, and the trench was filled with concrete to the 
centre of the 60-inch pipes for a distance of 25 feet each side of the 

corewall. 

Supply Pipe Lines. 

The work of laying the first of several pipe lines which will ulti- 
mately be required for conveying water from the terminus of the 
Weston Aqueduct into the Metropolitan District has been in progress 



160 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

during the past year. A contract for the first section of the work, 
beginning at the terminal chamber of the aqueduct, was made with 
Ward & Cummings of Boston, on July 26. The work includes a 
single line of 60-inch cast-iron pipe 1,570 feet in length, extending 
from the terminal chamber in Weston, through land of the Common- 
wealth and through private property to the westerly shore of the 
Charles River, and three lines of 60-inch pipes crossing under the 
bed of the river for a distance of 350 feet. Two of these lines 
across the river are for future use ; the third, which is connected 
with the line from the terminal chamber, will eventually supply two 
lines of 48-inch pipes, but for the present only one line is to be 
laid. Work under this contract was begun August 5. For laying 
the three lines of pipes under the Charles River the contractor was 
required to build a coffer-dam in two sections, so that there should 
always be nearly one-half of the river channel unobstructed. Work 
upon the western section of the coffer-dam, extending from the 
westerly shore of the river to the centre of the channel, enclosing a 
rectangular area 210 feet long by 50 feet wide, was begun August 15. 
The dam was constructed of two parallel rows of 4-inch tongued 
and grooved sheet piling, spaced 5 feet apart and, driven to a maxi- 
mum depth of 5 feet below the gravel bed of the river. The space 
between the two rows of sheeting was filled with a mixture of mud and 
gravel . The sheet piling was supported by round spruce piles driven 
7% feet apart on centres, and additional piles were driven inside 
the coffer-dam, which were used to support the bracing across the 
dam and also to support the sheeting of the trench, which was exca- 
vated inside the dam 25 feet in width and from 7 to 14 feet in depth. 
The bottom of this trench was about 14 feet below the average ele- 
vation of the water in the river. The material excavated was a 
rather coarse gravel, with coarse sand at the end of the excavation 
near the centre of the river. Through this the water flowed quite 
freely, and one 6-inch, one 8-inch and one 10-inch centrifugal pump 
were required to keep the water under control so that the pipes 
could be laid. The quantity pumped was estimated to be from 
5,000,000 to 6,000,000 gallons per twenty-four hours. The exca- 
vation inside the dam was begun on September 30, but on account 
of the breaking down of the pumps and engines, and of the insuffi- 
cient size of the pumping plant first installed, the work was delayed 
so that pipe laying was not begun until November 17. The joints 



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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 161 

of the pipes were run solid with lead so that they could be calked 
on the inside as well as on the outside of the pipe. After the joints 
had been calked the pipes were embedded in Portland cement con- 
crete, both for the purpose of preventing them from floating when 
empty and to protect them. The concrete was mixed in the propor- 
tion of 1 part by measure of cement, 3 parts of sand and 7 parts of 
stone, and the least thickness of concrete on the outside of the pipes 
is 6 inches. At the close of the year pipe laying between the ter- 
minal chamber and the centre of the river was completed, the west- 
erly half of the coffer-dam pulled up, and about one-half of the round 
piles for the easterly half of the dam had been driven. In connec- 
tion with this contract a gravel road 16 feet wide and 1,250 feet long 
has been built as a means of access to the terminal chamber from 
Loring Street. 

The second section of this pipe line is 48 inches in diameter, and 
extends for 17,100 feet through the Commonwealth Avenue boule- 
vard in Newton, from the easterly side of the Charles River to Wal- 
nut Street. A contract for doing the w T ork was made with D. F. 
O'Connell of Boston, on April 2. The delivery of pipes along the 
line of the work was begun on April 26, and the excavation of the 
trench on April 29. The work was continued until the end of 
the year, and the last pipe was laid on December 30. The greatest 
number of men employed during any week was 221, and the average 
was 138. In order to provide room for the 48-inch pipes, or to 
provide for the surface drainage system in Newton, it was found 
necessary to lay 3,294 feet of vitrified pipe from 8 inches to 20 
inches in diameter, to build 514 feet of 36-inch concrete drain, and 
to raise or lower water pipes at several points. Where the trench 
was excavated in rock it was made 14 feet in width, so that blasting 
alongside the pipes will not be necessary when another parallel line 
is laid in the future. At the crossing of the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road a right of way was taken through land belonging to the railroad 
company and the city of Newton, in which the pipes were laid cross- 
ing under the four tracks of the railroad alongside the bridge. 

The work of replacing the Telford foundation and resurfacing the 
roadways on this section has been done by the Street Department 
of the city of Newton, at the expense of the Commonwealth. At the 
close of the season 12,100 linear feet of the roadway had been re- 
surfaced, leaving 4,700 linear feet to be done to complete the work. 



162 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The cost of work done under this contract has been about 40 per 
cent, more than the estimated amount, due to changes made in the 
plans in order to avoid interference with the surface drainage system 
of the city of Newton, and to finding much more rock than was ex- 
pected. 

No contract has yet been made for the third section of this pipe 
line, which is about 9,800 feet in length, and will connect the end 
of Section 2 at the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and Walnut 
Street with Section 4 on Kenrick Street, near Waverley Avenue. 

That part of the pipe line known as Section 4 begins on Kenrick 
Street near Waverley Avenue, and extends through Magnolia Avenue 
and through private property to the Cochituate Aqueduct lands, 
which it enters at a point not far from the ventilator chamber on the 
aqueduct; thence it extends parallel with and from 12 to 15 feet 
north of the aqueduct for a distance of 3,100 feet to Commonwealth 
Avenue, which it enters near the line between Newton and Brighton ; 
thence in the southerly roadway of Commonwealth Avenue to the 
easterly end of Chestnut Hill Reservoir, and along the side of the 
reservoir for a distance of 900 feet to a point near the old effluent 
gate-house, where it will be connected with two 48-inch mains lead- 
ing toward Boston. A side outlet into Chestnut Hill Reservoir is 
also provided. 

A contract for laying these pipes was made with Thomas F. Moore 
of Syracuse, N. Y., on April 18, 1902. This contractor used a 
travelling machine for handling both the excavated material and the 
pipes, which was convenient and economical, but the rate of prog- 
ress was slower than by the usual methods of pipe laying. The 
machine consisted of a carriage spanning the trench, with wheels 
at the bottom running on rails laid on each side of the trench. 
By means of an engine and boiler mounted upon a platform at 
the forw r ard end of the excavation, and wire ropes attached to the 
carriage and passing around a pulley fastened to a fixed support at 
the rear end of the trench, the excavated material was raised, trans- 
ported and deposited in the trench after the pipes were laid, and 
the pipes themselves were also transported, lowered into the trench 
and placed in position by the machine. The average rate of prog- 
ress when no unusual conditions were encountered was from 350 to 
400 feet per week. At the end of the year the pipes were all laid 
with the exception of 100 linear feet on Kenrick Street. The trench 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 163 

has not been resurfaced for a distance of 3,500 feet at the westerly 
end of the section, and the work cannot be entirely finished until 
the coming spring. 

Southern Extra High-service Pipe Lines, Section 30. 

On April 28 a contract was made with T. Bruno of Boston for 
laying 8,800 feet of 12-inch pipe in Hyde Park, through West 
Street, from the West Roxbury line to the Neponset River, across 
the Neponset River and through Metropolitan Avenue to the Milton 
line, for the purpose of connecting the pipe system in West Rox- 
bury with that in Milton, in order that the higher portions of Milton 
might be supplied from the pumping station and standpipe of the 
West Roxbury high service. The work was commenced May 5 and 
completed August 22. At the crossing of West Street over the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad the pipes were placed under 
the floor of the sidewalk, and protected from the cold and from the 
locomotive gases by a covering made by steel plates placed under- 
neath the pipe and riveted to the sidewalk stringers, which, with 
the stringers and sidewalk planking, make a comparatively tight box. 
The Neponset River, at the point where the pipe crosses, is about 
140 feet in width, with a maximum depth of 6% feet. The pipes 
used for crossing the river were made with ball and socket joints. 
The contractor attempted to excavate the trench across the river 
and lay the pipes by the use of a coffer-dam, but finally abandoned 
this method, and excavated the trench with a dredge. The pipes 
were then joined together on the westerly shore, buoyed by empty 
oil barrels and drawn across the river, after which the barrel lash- 
ings were cut, allowing the pipe to settle into the trench. 

Bear Hill Reservoir. 

The C. H. Eglee Company had completed the greater part of the 
work of constructing this reservoir at the close of the year 1901, 
and during the winter it was kept filled with water to within 3% 
feet of high-water mark, in order to protect the masonry. On April 
3 the water was drawn off, and on April 17 work was resumed. 
The reservoir basin was completed on June 18, and filled with 
water on June 21 and 22. The construction of walks, grading of 
embankments and cleaning up of the grounds were finished on 
July 8. 



164 METROPOLITAN AVATER [Pub. Doc. 

The reservoir is 15 feet in depth, has a capacity of 2,450,000 
gallons, and the high-water elevation is 300 feet above Boston City 
Base. It was formed by constructing two dams across a depression 
in the rocky ridge which forms the summit of Bear Hill, and enclosing 
an area of about three-fourths of an acre. From this area the earth 
and rock were excavated for constructing the dams ; the rock surface, 
which composes nearly the entire bottom and slopes of the reservoir, 
was very thoroughly cleaned ; the seams, which were very numer- 
ous, were carefully pointed with Portland cement ; and the entire 
surface of the rock washed with Portland cement grout. The dams 
were built with an inner wall of Portland cement concrete, sup- 
ported on the outer side by an embankment of earth and loose rock. 
The concrete wall is vertical from the bottom to elevation 295, or '5 
feet below high- water mark, and above that point slopes outward 
and upward, with an inclination of 1 horizontal to 1 vertical, to a 
level 2 feet above high-water mark. The upper 5 feet of the slope 
are paved with stones from the excavation, averaging 16 inches in 
depth, laid in cement mortar. 

A small gate-chamber, built of concrete masonry with exterior 
granite facing, is located near the centre of the north dam. This 
chamber contains sluice gates for controlling the flow into and out 
of the reservoir, and a waste gate for draining the reservoir. In 
addition to a 20-inch pipe which enters the gate-chamber from the 
north, and acts both as a supply and delivery pipe, a 20-inch pipe 
has been laid from the chamber across the bottom of the reservoir, 
and carried through the south dam for use in supplying other towns 
in the future. The superstructure of the gate-chamber has not yet 
been built. 

The cost of the reservoir, exclusive of engineering, to December 
31, 1902, was $28,411.40. The capacity of the reservoir was in- 
creased nearly one-fourth above the original estimate, owing to the 
fact that the ledge composing the reservoir site was found to be 
very much broken up and full of seams, necessitating the removal 
of more rock than was expected ; and the cost of the reservoir was 
also increased, both by the cost of removing the rock and because 
of the pointing of seams, — a work which required much time and 
careful attention. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 165 

Forbes Hill Water Tower. 

At the close of the year 1901, James E. McCoy, the contractor 
for the construction of this tower, had built the circular masonry 
wall encircling the standpipe to a height of about 70 feet, or 7 feet 
below the finished height. The work progressed slowly, and was 
not completed until July 19. The tower is 77 feet high from the 
surface of the ground to the tops of the merlons. It is circular in 
section, having an inside diameter of 36% feet, leaving a space of 
3.25 feet between the wall and the outside of the standpipe which it 
encloses. The wall is built of uncoursed masonry, with joints of 
about % of an inch, and with cut-stone trimmings ; and is 4.75 feet 
thick at the base and 2 feet thick at the top just below the cornice. 
The granite used for the masonry was all furnished from the Quincy 
quarries, and the cut stone from both Quincy and Rockport. At 
the top of the tower there is a granolithic roof, which is accessible 
to the public by means of an iron stairway encircling the standpipe. 
This roof or floor is 260 feet above Boston City Base, and affords 
an extended view of the surrounding country. 

The total cost of the tower, exclusive of engineering, was $26,120. 

Installation of Venturi Meters. 
On May 13, 1902, an act of the Legislature was approved, author- 
izing the construction of works for measuring the water supplied to 
each of the cities and towns in the Metropolitan Water District ; 
and for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this act a 
contract was made on June 20 with the Builders Iron Foundry of 
Providence, R. I., for furnishing 42 Venturi meters, in sizes from 
8 inches to 48 inches ; and on August 4 a contract was made with 
the Daniel Russell Boiler Works of South Boston for furnishing 36 
steel chambers in which to place the registering apparatus of the 
meters. When the contract for the meters was made, it was ex- 
pected that they would all be delivered in time to be set before the 
end of the working season ; but, on account of difficulties in obtain- 
ing castings, and for other reasons, the work has been delayed, and 
only 24 of the meters were received in season to be set before the 
work was stopped by the cold weather ; and none of the registers 
had been received on December 31, although a few had been shipped 
by the manufacturer. 



166 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



At the close of the year the meter tubes and the chambers for 
holding the registering apparatus had been set at the following- 
points : — 



City, Town or 
District. 



Location. 



Size of Meter 
(Inches). 



Arlington, 

Belmont, . 

East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Brighton, 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Everett, 

Maiden, 

Maiden, 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Medford, 

Medford, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Milton, 

Revere, 

Somerville, 

Somerville, 

Somerville, 

Somerville, 

Watertown, 

Winthrop, 



Medford Street, at Parallel Street, 
Common Street, at Belmont Street, . 
Condor Street, at Brooks Street, 
Broadway, at Walnut Street, Somerville, 
Chestnut Hill Avenue, at Beacon Street, . 
Powderhorn Hill, near Reservoir, 
Hancock Street, at Broadway, . 
Broadway, at Corey Street, 
Highland Avenue, at Clifton Street, . 
Clifton Street, at Washington Street, 
Medford Street, at Pearl Street, . 
High Street, near Governors Avenue, 
Boston Avenue, at College Avenue, . 
Governors Avenue, at High Street, . 
Jerome Street, at High Street, . 
Ravine Road, at way to Melrose Reservoir, 
Adams Street, at Canton Avenue, 
Prospect Avenue, near Revere Reservoir, 
Boston Avenue, at Professors Row, . 
Broadway, at Willow Avenue, . 
Broadway, at Marshall Street, . 
Webster Avenue, near Newton Street, 
Mt. Auburn Street, near Irving Street, 
Atlantic Avenue, at Crescent Avenue, 



20 
12 
24 
24 
16 
16 
16 
20 
16 
16 
12 
10 
8 
20 
10 
20 
12 
12 
12 
16 
12 
20 
16 
16 



The Venturi meters consist of two truncated cones joined at their 
smallest diameters by a short throat piece having a diameter varying 
in different meters from % to % of the diameter of the large ends 
of the cones, the three parts making what is known as the meter 
tube. At the up-stream end and at the throat small holes are drilled 
into the tube, from which pipes are carried to the register. The 
operation of the meter is due to the fact that when water is flowing 
through the tube the pressure at the throat is less than at the 
up-stream end of the tube, and that the difference in pressure is 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 167 

dependent upon the quantity of water flowing through the tube. 
The differing pressures at the up-stream end and throat of the meter 
are transmitted through small pipes to the register, which can be 
located at any convenient point within 300 or 400 feet of the tube. 
In the register the differences of pressure affect the level of a column 
of mercury which carries a float. The position of this float is thus 
made dependent upon the quantity of water passing through the 
meter, and by suitable mechanism the quantity is recorded by a 
counter, and the rate of flow at intervals of ten minutes is continu- 
ously recorded upon a roll of paper, so that the fluctuations in the 
flow during different hours of the day can be observed. Although 
the pressure at the throat of the meter is often several pounds less 
than at the inlet or up-stream end, the lost pressure is nearly all 
regained by the time the water reaches the outlet end of the tube, 
so that the net loss of pressure caused by the meter is seldom more 
than one pound under ordinary circumstances. 

The entire consumption of the principal low-service district of 
Boston, amounting to 40,000,000 gallons per day, has for the last 
two years passed through two 48-inch meters of this type. 

Miscellaneous . 

Apparatus for operating the hydraulic sluice gates at the southern 
gate-house at Spot Pond, consisting of a force pump operated by 
hand, the necessary piping between the pump and the cylinders, and 
a tank for storing surplus oil, was installed in February, the work 
being done by the maintenance force. Oil which will not congeal 
at 1° below zero, F., was used in the cylinders for operating the 
valves. 

On November 14 an additional connection 12 inches in diameter 
w T as made between the Metropolitan mains and the Watertown pipe 
S3^stem at the junction of Common and Orchard streets in Water- 
town. 

Engineering. 

The engineering force has been engaged upon the preparation of 
plans and contracts, and the superintendence of the construction of 
10.6 miles of pipes, generally 48 inches and 60 inches in diameter, 
of the water tower at Quincy, and of the Bear Hill Reservoir in 
Stoneham. Surveys and plans have been made of Spot Pond Brook 
for a distance of nearly 4 miles between Spot Pond in Stoneham 



168 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

and Centre Street in Maiden, and studies and plans have been made 
for the improvement of the brook. The results of these surveys 
and investigations have been embodied in a special report for pres- 
entation to the Legislature. 

Investigations and plans have been made for metering the water 
supplied to the several cities and towns, and investigations have 
been commenced to determine the quantity of water used and wasted 
throughout the District. 

In connection with the maintenance of the works, the engineering 
force has superintended the installation of a new boiler at the 
Arlington pumping station, made tests of oils and coal in use at 
the pumping stations, prepared plans for additional steam piping at 
the low-service station at Chestnut Hill, and kept records of pressures 
in water mains, quantity of water pumped and consumed, and the 
elevation of the water in the several reservoirs. 

OFFICE FORCE. 

Alfred D. Flinn and Frank T. Daniels, Principal Office Assistants, John N. 

Ferguson, Office Assistant. 

As already stated, Mr. Flinn resigned to accept a position else- 
where, the resignation taking effect October 6 ; and Mr. Frank T. 
Daniels, who occupied the position of division engineer in charge 
of the drafting department of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, 
was transferred to the Water Works to take the vacant position. 

The average number in the drafting force during the year was 10, 
the same as last year. / 

The most important matters upon which the force has been engaged 
were the Wachusett Dam, the Weston Aqueduct, the relocation of 
the Central Massachusetts Railroad, the highway bridges at cross- 
ings of the Wachusett Reservoir, and the preparation of some of the 
contract plans for Section 10 of the Wachusett Reservoir, involving, 
among other things, an enlarged channel for the Quinepoxet River 
and a small circular concrete dam across the river. 

In connection with the work in progress at the Wachusett Dam 
many working plans have been made, particularly of the upper and 
lower gate-chambers, and the valves, pipes and other castings to be 
built into these structures and the dam. Before the final drawings 
could be made for the lower "rate-chamber, which is to form the 
foundation for the power house, it was necessary to complete the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 169 

preliminary studies for the power plant and the preliminary draw- 
ings for the superstructure. The latter drawings were made by 
Messrs. Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, architects. Much time of the 
department has been consumed in following up orders for pipes, 
valves, special castings and steel work, to prevent delay in the con- 
struction of the dam. 

The designing for the Weston Aqueduct related principally to the 
various chambers, the siphons across the valleys and the headworks 
near the" Sudbury Dam. Plans have also been made showing the 
necessary dimensions of ten superstructures required in connection 
with the aqueduct, which have since been designed by Messrs. Shep- 
ley, Rutan & Coolidge. Contracts and specifications for seven ot 
these structures have been prepared in part by the drafting depart- 
ment. In addition to the office work, Mr. Flinn had charge of the 
manufacture and inspection of the 7%-foot riveted steel pipes for 
the siphons of the aqueduct. Drawings and specifications were 
prepared for the connections between the pipes through the Sudbury 
Dam, and the head-chamber of the aqueduct. These connections 
included some difficult work in large pipes and special castings, a 
large underground outlet chamber through which water can be dis- 
charged into the channel leading to Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 
a masonry arch bridge of 30-foot span, a head-chamber and two 
smaller chambers, together with extensive grading. 

For the relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad, designs 
were prepared for the tunnel through the hill near Boylston Street, 
including two masonry portals, for the abutments of two highway 
bridges, for abutments and pedestals for the viaduct across the valley 
of the Nashua River, for masonry arch bridges to carry Clamshell 
Road over the railroad and the railroad over the waste channel below 
the dam, and for other minor structures. In this work the depart- 
ment conferred with Mr. J. P. Snow, the bridge engineer of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad, who also furnished the specifications and 
contract drawings for the steel superstructures of the two plate- 
girder bridges and the viaduct. 

In addition to the larger work already indicated, the drafting de- 
partment has been engaged on many detailed and minor drawings, 
and has made a large number of record plans. Among the minor 
drawings may be mentioned the plans for a frame carpenter shop to 
take the place of one burned at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, a design 



170 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

for steel chambers for the registers of Venturi meters to be placed 
beneath the sidewalks, a design of somewhat difficult centering for a 
skew arch bridge over the w r aste channel at the Wachusett Dam, 
and plans of the foundation and superstructure of a brick pumping 
station to be built at the Pegan Brook filters in Natick. 

In- all, 177 finished drawings w r ere made during the year, also 
many studies, sketches and computations. 

Mr. Ferguson has continued in charge of the miscellaneous work 
of the office, such as receiving applications from those desiring em- 
ployment, procuring supplies, making blue-prints and filing plans 
and records received from outside offices. He has furnished much 
assistance to the Conveyancing Department in the preparation of 
land plans, has made many investigations and computations, and has 
done much other work- of so varied a character that it cannot be 
enumerated in a report. The average force in his department has 
numbered 7. 

Accidents. 

Six fatal accidents have occurred during the year, 1 at the Wa- 
chusett Dam, 2 at the quarry which furnishes stone for the dam, 1 
on the relocation of the Central Massachusetts Railroad and 2 on the 
Weston Aqueduct. 

All of those at the Wachusett Dam, quarry and relocation of the 
railroad occurred in connection with the work of the McArthur 
Brothers Company. At the dam a laborer was killed by falling 
with a car from a trestle 20 feet high ; at the quarry one laborer 
was killed by the falling of one of the w T eights from the tripod of an 
air drill which was being moved by a derrick, and another by the 
falling of a large stone which w T as being removed by a derrick ; on 
the relocation of the railroad a foreman was killed by a premature 
blast. 

The first accident on the Weston Aqueduct occurred on Section 
13, where a laborer was killed by a runaway car on an incline ; and 
the second on Section 14, where a laborer was caught under a car 
while dumping it. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 171 



MAINTENANCE. 

The additional works maintained and operated in 1902 are the 
Bear Hill Reservoir in Stoneham and a new pipe line in Hyde Park 
to supply water to the high portions of Milton. 

Organization of Maintenance Force. 
At the beginning and end of 1902 the total maintenance force 
employed directly by the Board was 174, exclusive of such of the 
engineers as devoted only a part of their time to maintenance. 
From time to time during the year there has been an additional 
temporary force engaged on special work, making the maximum 
number, including both the permanent and temporary force, 233. 

Rainfall and Yield. 

The total rainfall for the year has been a very little less, and the 
yield of the watersheds a very little more, than the average. The 
distribution of the rainfall and yield throughout the year has not 
differed enough from normal to call for any special mention. Sta- 
tistics relating to rainfall and yield of watersheds may be found in 
Appendix No. 3, tables Nos. 1 to 11. 

Storage Reservoirs. 

Early in January the reservoirs on the Sudbury and Cochituate 
watersheds were as nearly full as it is desirable to keep them 
during the winter months. At the beginning of May they were 
entirely filled, and remained so until the first day of June, when 
they contained 16,129,500,000 gallons of water; after which the 
quantity of water stored gradually decreased until September 30, 
when there were 9,603,700,000 gallons in store. From this time 
until the middle of December the water in the reservoirs was rising 
slowly, and for the remainder of the year at a rapid rate. 

The following table gives the quantity of water stored in the 

storage reservoirs at the beginning of each month. The second 

column gives the total in the reservoirs from which the supply is 

usually taken, the third column the storage in the other reservoirs, 

. and the last column the total storage in all storage reservoirs. 



172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Quantity of Water stored in Reservoirs on Sudbury and Cochituate Water- 
sheds at the Beginning of Each Month. 



DATE. 



In Sudbury 

Reservoir and 

Framingharn 

Reservoir No. 3 

(Gallons). 


In All Other 

Storage Reservoirs 

(G-allons). 


Total 
(G-allons). 


7,127,200,000 


6,712,900,000 


13,840,100,000 


7,746,500,000 


6,601,100,000 


14,347,600,000 


7,754,400,000 


6,869,600,000 


14,624,000,000 


8,091,300,000 


7,238,400,000 


15,329,700,000 


8,489,600,000 


7,503,400,000 


15,993,000,000 


8,489,400,000 


7,640,100,000 


16,129,500,000 


7,776,400,000 


7,459,700,000 


15,236,100,000 


6,649,400,000 


6,564,600,000 


13,214,000,000 


5,972,000,000 


5,536,100,000 


11,508,100,000 


5,043,300,000 


4,685,800,000 


9,729,100,000 


5,643,900,000 


4,568,100,000 


10,212,000,000 


5,636,300,000 


4,550,000,000 


10,186,300,000 


6,236,600,000 


5,479,500,000 


11,716,100,000 



January 1, 1902, 
February 1, . 
March 1, 
April 1, 
May 1, . 
June 1, . 
July 1, . 
August 1, 
September 1, 
October 1, . 
November 1, 
December 1, 
January 1, 1903, 



Note. — The storage in Dudley Pond is included in this table. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — From the beginning of the year until the 
latter part of March the water in the Sudbury Reservoir was a little 
below the level of the crest. It reached the crest on March 26 and 
the top of the flash-boards on April 9. The surface remained near 
high- water level until June 15, when the draft from the reservoir 
began to exceed the supply ; it receded gradually about 8 feet, 
reaching elevation 251.85 on September 30. At the end of the 
year the water was 3.95 feet below the crest of the dam. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, at the head of one branch of 
the Sudbury Reservoir, have been in service throughout the year. 
They filtered all the water of the brook, excepting for short periods 
of less than a day each on several occasions during freshets. Dur- 
ing the year it was found necessary, besides removing the film which 
had collected upon the surface of the beds, to take off about 2 inches 
of sand which had become filled with fine organic matter. A con- 
siderable quantity of small stones was also removed from the 
"natural" beds and placed on the outside of the banks. Studies 
for an apparatus for washing the sand upon the beds and tests of an 
experimental apparatus have been made during the year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 173 

Analyses have been made monthly by the State Board of Health 
of the water before and after passing through the filter-beds, which 
show that the water was purified by the filters to a fairly satisfac- 
tory extent. 

The walls of Marlborough Brook above the Walker Street cul- 
vert, which were in bad condition, have been taken down and re- 
built for a distance of about 150 feet. The concrete structures 
connected with the filter-beds, which had cracked during the winter, 
have received the necessary pointing. 

A horse shed has been built near the filter-beds. 

A large number of hemlock, white pine and white spruce trees 
has been set out, and other small improvements have been made 
around the Sudbury Reservoir. 

While preparing for the connections with the Weston Aqueduct, 
it was discovered that the granite in the pipe-chambers and the bell- 
mouths connecting the chambers with the pipes through the dam had 
been badly eroded in places by the action of the water at high veloc- 
ities. The erosion had proceeded to such an extent that the bell- 
mouths, which were of cast iron 1.25 inches thick, were worn entirely 
through at a few points. Repairs to two of the chambers and bell- 
mouths have been made by bolting steel plates over the eroded 
places. 

Framingham Reservoir JVo. 3, which derives its supply almost 
wholly from the Sudbury Reservoir, was kept nearly full throughout 
the year, with an extreme range in elevation of about 4.5 feet. While 
the Sudbury Reservoir was full, or from early in April until the first 
part of June, the flash-boards were in position on the dam and the 
water kept as high as possible ; but during the remainder of the year 
it. was in general kept about 1 foot below the crest, to avoid wasting 
water from the effect of the wind. 

Framingham Reservoir JSfo. 2. — W^ater was drawn in consider- 
able quantities from this source for the supply of the Metropolitan 
District between June 30 and November 20. The surface was kept 
within 2 or 3 feet of high- water level by drafts from Ashland, Hop- 
kinton and Whitehall reservoirs. Except during the period men- 
tioned, the reservoir has been full throughout the year. 

The top planking of the Fountain Street bridge has been renewed, 
and Fountain Street gravelled within the limits of the reservoir, a 
distance of about 1,200 feet. 



174 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Framingham Reservoir JVo. 1 has been kept practically full 
throughout the year. Water was drawn in small quantities from 
this reservoir for the supply of the District from May 16 to June 29. 

Ashland Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year water was 
flowing over the spillway, and except as drawn down during Febru- 
ary and March in anticipation of freshets, the reservoir remained 
full until the first of August. After that date water was drawn into 
Framingham Reservoir No. 2 until October 27, when the surface 
was at elevation 213.98, or 11.23 feet below hi^h water. The water 
then began to rise, and at the end of the year was 3.89 feet below 
high-water mark. All the joints on the exterior of the gate-house, 
in both brick and stone work, were pointed as far as they were ac- 
cessible. 

Hopkinton Reservoir. — Water in this reservoir was flowing over 
the spillway at the beginning of the year. Except during February 
and March, when it was drawn down in expectation of freshets, the 
reservoir remained full until July 3, after which water was drawn 
from it to maintain the level of Framingham Reservoir No. 2, and 
the surface ^raduallv fell, reaching elevation 293.23, 11.77 feet be- 
low high-water mark, on October 1. At the end of the year it had 
risen to a point 2.12 feet below high water. All the water drawn 
from this reservoir for maintaining the supply was filtered through 
the filter-beds below the dam. 

Wliitehall Reservoir was practically full throughout the year, ex- 
cept during February, when it was drawn down somewhat in antici- 
pation of freshets. But little water has been drawn from this source 
to maintain the supply, and that between September 18 and Octo- 
ber 14. 

Farm Pond was full during the early part of the year, but after 
the first of June was gradually drawn down to a point about 1 foot 
below high water by the operations of the Framingham Water Com- 
pany. At the end of the year it had risen to 0.53 of a foot below 
high water. No water has been drawn from this pond for the supply 
of the Metropolitan District. 

At the Farm Pond gate-house the joints in the stonework and 
part of the brickwork have been thoroughly pointed, and a cap has 
been put on the chimney. 

Lake Cochituate at the beginning of the year was 2.71 feet below 
high water ; it was full on March 2, and so remained until the latter 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 175 

part of June. After this date the quantity drawn through the aque- 
duct was sufficient to lower the water at a practically uniform rate 
until November 21, when it was 8.76 feet below high-water mark. 
From this date to the end of the year the water was rising, and at 
the end of the year was 6.08 feet below high water. 

Water was wasted at the outlet dam almost continuously from the 
beginning of the year to January 24, and from February 18 to 
May 15. 

The diversion from the lake of the water collected on 1.96 square 
miles of Snake Brook watershed, in connection with the work of 
improving Snake Brook Meadow, as described in the last annual 
report, was continued until January 24. Allowance for this diver- 
sion and also for the amount of water pumped from Snake Brook 
Meadow and diverted from the lake was made in estimating the 
yield of the Cochituate watershed. 

Excepting 100,000 gallons on April 2, no water was discharged 
from the Sudbury Aqueduct into the lake during the year. 

Advantage was taken of the low stage of the water to excavate a 
considerable quantity of mud from the southerly end of the lake 
just west of the Boston & Albany Railroad culvert. An arrange- 
ment was made with Auguste Saucier, contractor for the work of 
excavation at Pegan Brook Meadow, to do this work, which was 
executed between the middle of October and December 4. The 
mud excavated was piled in embankments above high-water mark, 
and a considerable additional area of muddy bottom, which it was 
inexpedient to excavate, was covered with clean sand. 

There were 51,400,000 gallons of water drawn from Dudley Pond 
into Lake Cochituate between September 4 and 13. At the begin- 
ning of the year the pond was 2.17 feet below high water and at the 
end of the year 3.69 feet below high water. The highest point was 
reached on April 14, when the surface was 0.44 of a foot below 
high water. 

The Pegan Brook filter-beds in Natick have been in use 257 days 
during the year. All of the brook water was filtered except for 
portions of four days, when a small amount of water overflowed the 
settling reservoir and passed into the lake. Some of these filter- 
beds have also been used for filtering the water pumped from Pegan 
Brook Meadow while the work of excavation was in progress, and 
when the water was consequently unfit to be discharged into the 



176 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



lake. The total quantity of water pumped from Pegan Brook during 
the year was 224,677,800 gallons. The total quantity of coal con- 
sumed was 253,770 pounds, making 885 gallons of water pumped 
per pound of coal. 

The pumping plant now in use for raising water from the Pegan 
settling reservoir to the filter-beds consists of two 6-inch centrifugal 
pumps, belted to a semi-portable engine and boiler, and was origi- 
nally installed in a rough wooden house as a temporary plant. 
Owing to the unsatisfactory character of this plant and to the deci- 
sion, already noted, to extend the Pegan Brook filtration system 
while making the improvements at the Pegan Brook Meadow, it 
was concluded to entirely reconstruct the pumping plant upon a 
permanent basis. Plans have accordingly been made for a small 
brick pumping station, which it is intended to erect early in the 
coming year just below the dam of the old settling reservoir. 

The foundations of the station have been carried to an average 
depth of about 9 feet through mud to a firm stratum of sand and 
fine gravel. A beginning was made in December, and about one- 
half of the concrete foundations was completed at the end of the 
year. 

The machinery to be installed will consist of one 8-inch and one 
10-inch centrifugal pump, directly connected to vertical compound 
engines of the marine type, similar to those in use at the Alewife 
Brook pumping station of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

A force main will be laid from the new pumping station, to con- 
nect with the existing pipe which discharges upon the filter-beds, 
and also with a 12-inch pipe under the Boston & Albany Railroad, 
which was laid at the time the new railroad embankment was con- 
structed, by which the farther beds can be reached through a second 
pipe line. At the end of the year only a few lengths of this pipe 
had been laid. 



Sources from which Water has been taken. 
During the year the only water supplied from local sources was 
20,190,000 gallons supplied for use in the town of Milton by the 
Hyde Park Water Company, and 9,830,000 gallons drawn by the 
city of Medford from Wright's Pond, making in all an average of 
82,000 gallons per day for th,e whole year from local sources. All 
of the supply, except this very small quantity, was furnished by 



No. 57.] AND SEWEEAGE BOARD. 177 

the Metropolitan Works, which supplied an average of 107,186,000 
gallons per day. An average of 66,127,000 gallons a day was 
drawn from the South Branch of the Nashua River through the Wa- 
chusett Aqueduct into the Sudbury Reservoir, and an average of 
85,314,000 gallons a day was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct 
from Framingham Reservoir No. 3, which obtains its supply mainly 
from the Sudbury Reservoir. An average of 10,331,000 gallons 
per day was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct from Framingham 
reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, which receive all of the water supplied by 
the main Sudbury River. An average of 12,165,000 gallons per 
day was drawn from Lake Cochituate. 

The utmost care is taken to draw as little water as possible from 
the less satisfactory sources, and to draw the water only at such 
times as it is in good condition ; but the maintenance of the supply, 
with the existing condition of the works and the large consumption 
of water, makes it necessary to draw some of the water from the 
less desirable sources. 

Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct has been in use 309 days during the year. 
It was shut off for 35 days in the winter and spring, when the river 
water was somewhat turbid, and on 21 days was shut off for clean- 
ing the aqueduct, making repairs to the small flume near the dam, or 
for changing from the temporary to the permanent works at the dam. 
The usual work of maintenance along the line of the aqueduct has 
been performed, and the aqueduct and its appurtenances are in excel- 
lent condition. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in constant service throughout the 
year, except on a few occasions when it was necessary to empty it 
for cleaning. The total flow for the whole year averaged 95,645,000 
gallons per day, which is 5,317,000 gallons more than the daily 
amount of water carried by the aqueduct last year. The interior of 
the aqueduct from Framingham Dam No. 1 to the terminal chamber 
at Chestnut Hill Reservoir was cleaned twice during the year ; first 
on April 3, 10, 17 and 24 ; and a second time on October 16, 23 
and 30, and November 6. The siphon pipes were cleaned at the 
time of the first cleaning only. In April it was found that the in- 
terior of the aqueduct was covered with a thick coating of black 
slime for its entire length, and considerable quantities of sponge 



178 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



were found, principally on the invert. At the time of the second 
cleaning the slime was not very thick, and but little sponge was 
found. The second cleaning was undertaken in order to maintain 
the capacity of the aqueduct at as high a figure as possible during 
the winter, when the consumption of the water in the District is 
greatest. 

The Framingham low-level sewer in the valley of Beaver Dam 
Brook passes under the Sudbury Aqueduct at the junction of Irving 
and Herbert streets in South Framingham. The Framingham Sewer 
Department began the construction of this crossing on August 4. 
It was intended to employ the method of forcing cylindrical telescopic 
steel pipes from each side through the earth at some distance below 
the bottom of the aqueduct, in accordance with a plan which had 
proved successful in other cases. The work had progressed so that 
pits on both sides of the aqueduct had been carried down to grade, 
and one of the pipes was in position to be forced under the aque- 
duct, when it was found that the condition of the ground was such 
that the aqueduct was likely to be injured if the work proceeded in 
accordance with the plan. As it was necessary to keep the aqueduct 
running full without cessation in order to supply water to the Dis- 
trict, no work which menaced the safety of the supply could be 
permitted, even though it might have proved successful. On the 
other hand, it was very desirable that the work should be completed 
without delay, in order to divert sewage from a somewhat thickly 
populated district, which was a menace to the purity of the water 
supply. Under these circumstances it was decided to adopt a differ- 
ent plan, which provided for removing the earth from over and around 
the aqueduct and for supporting the aqueduct from heavy steel beams 
crossing the sewer trench, also for making a passage for the sewer 
pipe immediately under the wooden platform on which the aqueduct 
was constructed. This additional work was done by the Board. 
The aqueduct was suspended from two 20-inch steel beams on either 
side of and parallel with it by steel rods having stirrups at their 
lower ends, which supported the ends of 8-inch steel beams passing 
under the platform on which the aqueduct was built. The nuts on 
these suspension rods were screwed up to such a point that the whole 
weight of the aqueduct was supported by the beams. The 18-inch 
cast-iron pipe was placed in position under the aqueduct, and all 
spaces under the platform and around the pipe and 8-inch beams 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 179 

were entirely filled with Portland cement mortar. Work under the 
new plan was begun on September 15 and completed on November 
12, at an expense of a little more than $3,000. 

Boylston Street in Newton has been widened to accommodate the 
tracks of the Boston & Worcester Street Railway. Where the 
aqueduct passes under Boylston Street it has been strengthened by 
an additional ring of brick for a length of about 51 feet. While 
the widening was in progress the city of Newton placed two 8-inch 
pipes, one for sewage and the other for surface drainage, in the cul- 
vert under the aqueduct, in addition to an 8-inch water main pre- 
viously laid there. After the new pipes had been placed the culvert 
was filled solid with natural cement concrete. 

The interior of the arches at the Waban Bridge was heated with 
steam during the winter months, to prevent the formation of ice 
inside of the bridge. Echo Bridge also requires considerable at- 
tention during the cold weather, to prevent the formation of ice in 
the interior of the arches. 

A storehouse 21 feet by 40 feet on the ground and one and one- 
half stories high has been built near the west siphon chamber. The 
entire exterior surface was covered with galvanized iron, as a pro- 
tection against fire. 

All the joints in the masonry of Beaver Dam Brook culvert and 
those in the up-stream side of the Course Brook culvert above water 
level were pointed during the year. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use 259 days. The interior of 
the aqueduct was cleaned from the influent gate-house at Lake Co- 
chituate to Brookline Reservoir, with the exception of the siphon 
pipes, on May 1, 2 and 3. The interior coating of black slime was 
thick near the westerly end, but gradually diminished in thickness 
from Dedman's waste-weir to the intermediate gate-bouse at Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir, except at the westerly end of the Newton tunnel, 
where there was a thick coating. Sponge was found in considerable 
quantities, especially where the slime was thick. From the inter- 
mediate gate-house to the Brookline Reservoir, especially in the 
Brookline tunnel, the coating was very thick, with considerable 
quantities of sponge. 

In May, by permission of the Boston Water Commissioner, a 
stop-plank gate was built in Webber's waste-weir, a short distance 
east of the Chestnut Hill pumping station, by which the Cochituate 



180 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Aqueduct could be shut off at that point and the Brookline Reservoir 
disconnected. 

A new flume was put in the embankment over the aqueduct in 
the cut east of Snake Brook, by which any diversion of water from 
the Cochituate watershed at this point can be controlled. 

The masonry of the substructure of the east pipe chamber at the 
Charles River siphon was strengthened many years ago by a casing 
of concrete. It was discovered that this concrete had settled away 
from the masonry and cracked. All the spaces and cracks were 
cleaned out, grouted and pointed with Portland cement. The iron- 
work in all structures along the aqueduct has been painted. The 
aqueduct was crossed at five places in Wellesley by the mains of 
the Newton & Watertown Gas Company. At these crossings, and 
for some distance on each side of the aqueduct, the gas pipes were 
laid with lead joints. 

The quantity of water flowing in both the Sudbury and Cochituate 
aqueducts has been determined by current meter measurements 
made from time to time during the year. 

Pumping Stations. 

All water supplied to the Metropolitan Water District has been 
pumped at the two stations at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, with the 
exception of the very small quantity of water supplied from the 
Spot Pond watershed and by cities and towns from local sources. 
Seventy-two per cent, of the water was pumped at the low-service 
and 28 per cent, at the high-service station. The supply for the 
northern high-service district, after being pumped from Chestnut 
Hill to Spot Pond, has been again raised to the Fells or Bear Hill 
reservoir. The supplies for the northern extra high service in 
Arlington and the southern extra high service in West Roxbury 
and Milton have been pumped at the small stations in Arlington and 
West Roxbury. 

The daily pumping capacity of all the stations is 204,500,000 
gallons, and the force employed numbers 48, both figures being the 
same as at the date of the last annual report. 

The total quantity pumped at all of the stations during the year was 
42,000,400,000 gallons, and the cost of operating the stations was 
$105,226.76, equivalent to $2.50 per million gallons pumped. This 
is 2 cents less than the corresponding cost for the year 1901, and 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



181 



may be considered a favorable showing, taking into consideration 
the facts that the cost of fuel, which is nearly one-half of the total 
expense of pumping, was from $0.50 to $0.85 per ton, or 12 to 20 
per cent, more in 1902 than in 1901, and that a large payment on 
account of new boilers made the cost of repairs 12 cents more per 
million gallons pumped than for the previous years. 

Coal for use at the several- stations has been purchased as fol- 
lows : — 





Gross Tons. 






Chestnut 
Hill High- 


Chestnut 
Hill Low- 


Spot 
Pond 


West 
Roxbury 


Arling- 
ton 


Price 

per Gross 

Ton. 




service 
Station. 


service 
Station. 


Station. 


Station. 


Station. 




Loyal Hanna Coal and Coke Com- 


1,187.60 


1,426.02 


_ 


_ 


_ 


$4 34 


pany, bituminous. 














Loyal Hanna Coal and Coke Com- 


854.39 


742.61 


- 


- 


- 


4 69 


pany, bituminous. 














Loyal Hanna Coal and Coke Com- 


662.00 


595.64 


- 


- 


- 


6 86 


pany, bituminous. 














Loyal Hanna Coal and Coke Com- 


- 


- 


487.15 


- 


- 


5 22 


pany, bituminous. 














Gillespie & Pierce, bituminous, . 


111.03 


27.40 


- 


- 


- 


4 93 


Gillespie & Pierce, bituminous, . 


8.26 


43.56 


- 


- 


- 


5 60 


Gillespie & Pierce, bituminous, . 


252.22 


190.90 


- 


- 


- 


8 40 


Gillespie & Pierce, screenings, . 


291.35 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 24 


Locke Coal Company, bituminous, . 


- 


- 


100.00 


- 


- 


4 87 


Locke Coal Company, bituminous, . 


- 


- 


133.93 


- 


- 


6 72 


Locke Coal Company, buckwheat 


_ 


«. 


201.74 


_ 


_ 


4 25 


anthracite. 














J. A. Whittemore's Sons, anthracite, 


- 


- 


- 


44.64 


- 


6 44 


D. J. Cutter & Co., anthracite, . 


- 


- 


- 


89.37 


- 


$6 05 to 7 84 


D. J. Cutter & Co., bituminous, 


- 


- 


- 


52.32 


- 


6 16 and 8 96 


E. B. Townsend, bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


22.32 


- 


11 20 


D. Doherty, bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


22.32 


- 


8 96 


Pierce & Winn Company, bituminous, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


267.44 


4 76 to 8 68 


Pierce & Winn Company, screenings, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


61.94 


2 22 to 2 55 


Total gross tons, bituminous, 


3,075.50 


3,026.13 


721.08 


96.96 


267.44 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite, 


- 


- 


201.74 


134.01 


- 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite screen- 


291.35 


_ 


_ 


_ 


61.94 


_ 


ings. 














Average price per gross ton, bi- 


$5 34 


$5 20 


$5 45 


$8 61 


$5 91 


- 


tuminous. 














Average price per gross ton, an- 


- 


- 


4 25 


6 52 


- 


- 


thracite. 














Average price per gross ton, an- 


2 24 


- 


- 


- 


2 29 


- 


thracite screenings. 















The necessary apparatus has been obtained for making tests of the 
viscosity, specific gravity and burning points of the oil, and of the 



182 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



thermal value of coal used at the pumping stations, and tests are now 
made of the oil and coal as furnished. Fifty tests of lubricating oil 
have been made, and the oil now used is supplied in conformity 
with specifications prepared by this department. Thirteen tests of 
coal have been made, and the results have proved of value in select- 
ing coal, although the state of the coal market during the greater 
part of the year was such that coal was purchased with little regard 
for quality. 

Chestnut Hill High-service Station. 

The supplies for the high-service district of Boston, the whole of 
the city of Quincy and the towns of Watertown and Belmont, and 
the greater part of the town of Milton after February 28, were 
pumped at this station. The 30,000,000-gallon Allis engine pumped 
92.9 per cent, of the entire quantity pumped at the station. 

The following are the statistics relating to the operations at this 
station : — 



Engine 
No. 1. 


Engine 
No. 3. 


Engine 
No. 4. 


273.90 


503.39 


10,118.61 


380,417 


443,134 


8,078,166 


720.00 


Ijl35.98 


1,252.59 


119.99 


123.70 


128.43 


$97i 25 


$771 28 


$12,540 53 


847 87 


994 25 


17,436 73 


610 41 


484 74 


7,881 48 


44 67 


35 47 


576 75 


73 57 


58 42 


949 87 


$2,547 77 


$2,344 16 


$39,385 36 


$9 302 


$4 657 


$3 892 


078 


038 


030 



Totals. 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds) 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 
Average head pumped against (feet), 
Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Small supplies, 

Total for station, 

Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir, 
Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



10,895.90 

8,901,717 

1,224.02 

127.97 

$14,283 06 

19,278 85 

8,976 63 

656 89 

1,081 86 



$44,277 29 

$4 064 

032 



The cost per million gallons pumped to the reservoir was $0.48 
more than in 1901, due to increased cost of fuel and repairs and to 
increase in the head pumped against. 

Early in the year specifications were prepared for two 98-inch 
diameter vertical fire-tube boilers, from designs ' made by Dean & 
Main, mechanical engineers; and on February 24 a contract was 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 183 

made with the I. P. Morris Company of Philadelphia for furnishing 
the boilers for the sum of $6,250 each. It was expected that the 
boilers would be delivered during the summer and placed in service 
before the end of the year ; but the contractor experienced great 
difficulty in obtaining steel plates and other material of the high 
quality required, so that, although nearly finished at the shop, the 
boilers had not been delivered at the close of the year. 

During the year new stay bolts were put in and other repairs 
made to the No. 4 boiler, and the American mechanical stoker which 
was in use with the boiler was replaced by a Continental shaking 
grate. 

Three of the pump valves on engine No. 3 were fitted with new 
trunnions and trunnion boxes, and all three of the pump plungers 
were repacked. One leaky tube was replaced in the Wainwright 
heater connected with engine No. 4. 

Chestnut Hill Low-service Station. 

The three 35,000,000-gallon engines at this station have pumped 
a daily average for the entire year of 76,553,000 gallons. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 

Engines 
Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 27,941.95 

Total coal used (pounds), 8,275,464 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 3,376.48 

Average head pumped against (feet), 42.48 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $16,955 70 

Fuel, 18,276 50 

Repairs, 839 15 

Oil, waste and packing, 705 74 

Small supplies, 1,108 24 

Total for station, $37,885 33 

Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir, f 1 356 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, ...... 032 

The cost per million gallons pumped to the reservoir was $0,146 
less than for the year 1901. 

The machinery at this station has continued to work satisfactorily, 
and is now in good condition. The only repairs made to the plant, 
with the exception of minor repairs made by the regular employes, 



184 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

were a new valve wrist plate on the No. 5 engine, which was broken 
on account of a dry bearing, and new lifting levers on the upper 
valves of the low-pressure cylinders. 

Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

At this station engine No. 8 was not used during the year, all 
of the water having been pumped with engine No. 9, a 20,000,000- 
gallon Holly engine. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 

Engine No. 9. 

Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 2,919.01 

Total coal used (pounds), 2,267,456 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 1,287.35 

Average head pumped against (feet), 123.73 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $6,998 51 

Fuel, 5,328 25 

Repairs, Ill 07 

Oil, waste and packing, 211 09 

Small supplies, 513 98 

Total for station, $13,162 90 



Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir, 
Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



U 509 
036 



Engine No. 9 has given a much better duty than during the pre- 
vious year, so that, notwithstanding an increase of 4 per cent, in 
the head pumped against and an increase of 5.5 per cent, in the 
quantity pumped, there was a decrease in the amount of coal used 
of 6.3 per cent. The cost per million gallons pumped to the 
reservoir was $0,328 less than during the previous year, although 
the cost of fuel was $0.85 per ton, or nearly 20 per cent, more than 
for the year 1901. 

The machinery is in good condition, with the exception of a very 
small leak in the lower joint of the high-pressure steam cylinder on 
engine No. 9. 

West Poxbury Pumping Station. 

The water pumped at this station supplied the extra high-service 
district in West Roxbury for the whole year, and a portion of the 
town of Milton after August 22. The machinery has shown better 
economy, but the cost of pumping has been increased by increased 
cost of labor and fuel. The principal item of repairs was the sub- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



185 



stitution of Bannister shaking grates for the plain grates furnished 
with the boilers, which had become badly warped. 

On January 4, Frank Matthews, the engineer in charge of this 
station, was given two months leave of absence on account of poor 
health. He died on August 6. He had been employed in the 
pumping stations of the Boston and Metropolitan Works for more 
than thirty years, and was a very faithful employe. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 

Pumps operated 4,701 hours ; average, 13 hours per day. 

Daily average quantity of water pumped (gallons), .... 352,000 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), .... 1,300 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 271 

Average lift in feet, 133 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $3,239 33 

Fuel, 1,679 93 

Repairs and small supplies, 287 41 

Total for station, $5,206 67 

Cost per million gallons pumped to reservoir, $40 554 

Cost per million gallows raised 1 foot high, 305 

Arlington Pumping Station. 

The supply for the high-service district of the town of Arlington 
was pumped at this station, and between September 4 and Novem- 
ber 17, 4,320,000 gallons were also pumped for furnishing a portion 
of the supply of the town of Lexington. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Pumps operated 5,341 hours 5 minutes ; average, 15 hours per day. 
Daily average quantity of water pumped (gallons), 
Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average lift in feet, 
Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs and small supplies, . 

Total for station, . 

Cost per million gallons pumped to standpipe, 
Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



315,000 

1,922 

164 

278 

$2,708 87 

1,722 53 

263 17 

$4,694 57 

$40 769 
147 



186 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The cost of pumping at this station shows an increase of $10.43 
per million gallons pumped. This increase is due to an increase of 
50 per cent, in the cost of fuel and of 30 per cent, in the cost of 
labor, the latter largely due to the employment of another engineer 
while water was supplied to the town of Lexington. 

The 72-inch vertical boiler which was purchased from the city of 
Chelsea in 1901 was set up, covered with magnesia and connected 
with the pumps early in the year. During the year the old boiler 
has been examined and cleaned, the steam joints upon the compound 
pump repaired, and the boilers and pumps and the exterior of the 
building painted. A small concrete dam and new intake for the 
condenser pump were constructed at Mill Brook, the brook below 
the dam cleaned out, and the side- walls of the brook rebuilt. 

Consumption of Water. 

The daily average quantity of water consumed in the cities and 
towns of the Metropolitan Water District, supplied wholly or in 
part by the Metropolitan Works during the year 1902, was 107,- 
268,000 gallons, equal to 123 gallons per inhabitant in the district 
supplied. Of the above, 107,186,000 gallons per day were supplied 
by the Metropolitan Water Works, and 82,000 gallons per day 
from local sources. The increase over the consumption of the pre- 
vious year was 5,776,000 gallons per day, or 5.6 per cent. A 
small part of this increase was due to the addition of Milton to the 
territory supplied with Metropolitan water in 1902. If the water 
consumed in Milton in both years were included in making the com- 
parison, then the increase during the past year would be 5,505,000 
gallons per day, or 5.4 per cent. The increase in the quantity con- 
sumed per inhabitant was 3 gallons per day, or 2.5 per cent. 

The consumption of water during the month of December was 
20,000,000 gallons per day greater than during the month of No- 
vember, and more than 6,500,000 gallons per day greater than in 
any previous month in the past. This was due to the use or waste 
of water to prevent the freezing of pipes. It is estimated that the 
total quantity of water used or wasted to prevent freezing during 
the colder months of the year was equivalent to a daily average con- 
sumption of 4,500,000 gallons for the entire year. 

The consumption and percentage of increase over the previous 
year in the several districts was as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



187 



Gallons 
per Day. 



Percentage 
of Increase. 



Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of Boston, 
with the exception of Cbarlestown and East Boston, 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts of Somer- 
ville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, Charlestown and East 
Boston, 

Southern high-service district, embracing the high-service districts of Boston, 
Quincy, Watertown, Belmont, and a portion of Milton, 

Northern bi«h-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Winthrop, Swamp- 
scott, Nah int and Stoneham, and the high service districts of Somerville, 
Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and East Boston, 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the highest portions of West 
RoxDury and Milton, 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing the highest portions of Ar- 
lington, . . , 



42,469,000 

26,589,000 
29,543,000 

7,999,000 
364,000 
304,000 



107,268,000 



6.8 

0.3 
11.5 

—1.2 

9.0 

—1.6 

I 



For reasons not entirely apparent, the consumption of the south- 
ern part of the District shows an increase, while that in the northern 
part was slightly less than during 1901. A reduction of about 
475,000 gallons per day in the consumption of the northern high- 
service district was made in August by the stoppage of leaks in the 
street mains and services in the town of Stoneham ; and the inspec- 
tion which was made during the summer to prevent the unlawful 
use of hand hose without doubt tended to reduce the consumption 
through this district. During each of the last six months of the 
year the consumption of this district was less than daring the corre- 
sponding months of the previous year, and the average for the last 
half of the year was more than 1,000,000 gallons per day less than 
for the same time in 1901. 

The consumption of the southern high-service district was in- 
creased about 250,000 gallons per day by the addition of the town 
of Milton, and about one-half of the increase in the southern extra 
high-service district was also due to the same cause. 

Detailed statistics of the consumption of water may be found in 
Appendix No. 3, tables Nos. 19 to 23. 

Quality of the Water. 

Samples of water were collected every two months from ten 
points, monthly from eight points and weekly from three points 
upon the works, and sent to the State Board of Health for analysis 
and examination. Samples of water were also collected each week 
from many points upon the works, and examined microscopically 



188 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



and for color, odor, taste and turbidity by the biological force of the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

The quality of the water furnished was about the same as that of 
the previous year. The average color was slightly greater accord- 
ing to the State Board of Health examinations, and slightly less 
according to the Metropolitan Water Works examinations. As far 
as shown by the chemical examinations by the State Board of Health, 
the tap water of the main portion of the Metropolitan supply was 
somewhat better, while as far as concerns freedom from microscopical 
organisms it was not quite so good. The following table gives a 
comparison of the average results of examinations of Boston tap 
water, made for the years 1897 to 1902, inclusive. The additional 
supply from the South Branch of the Nashua River first reached the 
Metropolitan District about May 1, 1898. 



1897. 



1898. 



1899. 



1900. i 1901. 



1902. 



State Board of Health Examinations. 
Color (Ne-sler standard), 

Total residue 

Loss on ignition, 

Free ammonia, 

( total, 
Albuminoid ammonia, < dissolved, 

( suspended, 

Chlorine 

Nitrogen as nitrates 

Nitrogen as nitrites, . 

Oxygen consumed 

Hardness, 



Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board Examinations. 
Color (platinum standard), 
Turbidity, 
Total organisms, 
Amorphous matter, . 
Bacteria, .... 



0.65 

4.82 

1.84 

0.0009 

0.0193 

0.0177 

0.0016 

0.40 

0.0137 

0.0001 

0.64 

1.6 



0.59 



351 
177 
105 



0.41 

4.19 

1.60 

0.0008 

0.0152 

0.0136 

0.0016 

0.29 

0.0097 

0.0001 

0.44 

1.4 



0.40 



0.23 

3.70 

1.30 

0.0006 

0.0136 

0.0122 

0.0014 

0.24 

0.0137 

0.0001 

0.35 

1.1 



0.32 



0.24 

3.80 

1.20 

0.0012 

0.0157 

0.0138 

0.0019 

0.25 

0.0076 

0.0001 

0.38 

1.3 



0.34 



230 

131 

96 



192 
201 
117 



468 

97 

181 



.24 

.43 

.64 

.0013 

.0158 

.0143 

0.0015 

0.30 

0.0173 

0.0001 

0.42 

1.7 



0.34 
2.0 

243 
38 

162 



0.26 

3.93 

1.56 

0.0016 

0.0139 

0.0119 

0.0020 

0.29 

0.0092 

0.0001 

0.40 

1.3 



0.33 
2.3 

367 
34 

164 



Note. — Chemical analyses are in parts per 100,000, organisms and amorphous matter in standard 
units per cubic centimeter, and bacteria in number per cubic centimeter. The standard unit has an area 
of 400 square microns, and by its use the number of diatomaceae are decreased, and the number of 
chlorophyceae and cyanophyceae are very much increased, as compared with the number of organisms. 

A considerably larger supply of water than during the previous 
year was furnished to the Metropolitan District, owing to the in- 
creased consumption ; and the greater part of this increase has been 
met by drawing an increased quantity from Framingham Reservoir 
No. 2. A somewhat smaller quantity was drawn from Lake 
Cochituate than during the preceding year. Although the water 
from Framingham Reservoir No. 2 is generally of less satisfactory 
quality than that from Framingham Reservoir No. 3, which comes 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 189 

mainly from Sudbury Reservoir and the Nashua River, nevertheless, 
the quality of the supply as a whole has been maintained about the 
same as last year, by drawing the water from Framingham Reservoir 
No. 2 when at its best condition, and utilizing as far as possible the 
water in Ashland and Hopkinton reservoirs, which had been much 
improved by long storage. 

Appendix No. 3, tables Nos. 24 to 30, gives the detailed results 
of chemical examinations of water in the various parts of the Metro- 
politan Water Works. 

Biological Laboratory. 

On April 28 Edward P. Walters, assistant biologist, was pro- 
moted to chief biologist, and he has been in charge of the laboratory 
throughout the year. 

During the year 2,657 microscopical and 1,048 bacterial exami- 
nations of water were made at the laboratory of the Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage Board, at No. 1 Ashburton Place, Boston. 
Of the microscopical examinations, 2,201 were of the regular weekly 
samples and 456 were made in connection with special examinations. 
Determinations of color, odor and turbidity have been made of all 
samples collected, and the temperature of the water has been noted 
in connection with all the regular weekly samples. Examinations 
of coal and of oil for use in the pumping stations have also been 
made in this laboratory. 

The results of the color examinations are given in Appendix No. 
3, Table No. 31, and the temperatures of the water and of the air 
in tables Nos. 32 and 33. Tables showing the results of the micro- 
scopical and bacterial examinations arid the turbidity observations, 
which have been included in former reports, are omitted this year. 

Sanitary Inspection. 

The sanitary inspection of the Sudbury, Cochituate and Wachu- 
sett watersheds has been continued during the year, under the 
direction of William W. Locke, C.E., sanitary inspector. The 
greater part of the inspection has been done upon the Sudbury and 
Cochituate watersheds, where there is a large population ; but a 
much larger amount of work than heretofore has been done on the 
Wachusett watershed, and the results obtained continue to be very 
satisfactory. 



190 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Cases of contagious diseases upon the Wachusett watershed and 
within the site of the Wachusett Reservoir have been few. In 
September five cases of typhoid fever were discovered in rapid suc- 
cession in Holden among laborers employed upon the construction 
of the electric railway from Worcester to Holden. The water sup- 
plied the laborers was obtained from a spring near their camp and 
from three farmers' wells in the vicinity. On account of the prox- 
imity of privies and sink drains to the wells, they were closed at 
once, and water was temporarily furnished to the houses at the ex- 
pense of the Board. Samples of the water from these wells were 
collected, and analyses gave unmistakable evidence of considerable 
previous pollution. Inquiry into the history of the farmhouses 
showed that typhoid fever had existed in recent years in all three of 
them. Upon presenting this information to the Board of Health of 
Holden, that Board at once permanently closed the wells and ordered 
the owners to dig new ones. No additional cases of typhoid fever 
developed. 

The work of collecting statistics of population, sources of pol- 
lution, etc., on the Wachusett watershed, begun during the previous 
year, has been completed. For convenience of inspection and tabu- 
lation, the whole watershed has been divided into 13 districts, fol- 
lowing the divides separating the watersheds of the various brooks. 
The data thus collected is presented in the following table : — 





Premises.* 


■ 
Si 

i 

o 

— 
es 


Popula- 
tion. t 


9 

s 

u 9 

5 c 














DISTRICT. 




•a 
9 


E 

3 




a 

>- 
o 


a 

9 

C 
rt 

a 

la 

9 








8 

3 


3 ei 
« c 

O 


•3 

V . 
~- x 
— - 
3 « 

o 


a 
a 
u 

> 


_ X 

9 3 

Q 


a- 

m 

a 
c 

u 

< 


9 

s 
s 


.2gq 
Is 

3 

o 


■ 

9 

h 

O 

M 


6 


d 

9 
V 

a 

3D 


9 

3 

CD 


>> 

u 

3 
O 

2- 


i 

BO 
O 

Q 


French Brook, . 


73 


63 


_ 


8 




4.65 


309 




66.4 


76 


270 




47 


2,654 


29 


Muddy Brook, . 


32 


29 


- 


2 


- 


2.92 


124 


- 


42.5 


41 


215 


- 


14 


1,264 


15 


Gates Brook, . 


114 


106 


- 


3 


1 


3.56 


432 


16 


121.5 


115 


201 




75 


1,971 


43 


Maiden Brook, . 


19 


15 


i 


- 


2 


2.44 


78 


5 


32.0 


28 


93 


~ 


6 


549 


9 


Chaffin Brook, . 


147 


136 


i 


2 


2 


10.22 


651 


20 


63.7 


119 


393 




44 


6,460 


64 


Asnebumskit Brook, 


266 


231 


ii 


11 


1 


12.91 


1,3*6 


304 


107.4 


233 


470 


1 


122 


4,232 


76 


Muequapoatr Brook, 


105 


82 


5 


11 


4 


11.67 


370 


89 


31.7 


107 


456 


- 


66 


4,469 


48 


South Wachusett Brook, 


94 


70 


6 


8 


2 


10.82 


245 


135 


22.6 


95 


509 


40 


114 


2,272 


31 


Trout Brook, . 


59 


37 


2 


5 


11 


8.59 


223 


15 


26.0 


41 


98 


1 


18 


1,017 


27 


East Wachusett Brook, . 


225 


162 


24 


16 


11 


21.26 


568 


324 


26.7 


236 


683 


- 


90 


4,291 


79 


Stillwater River, 


181 


160 


1 


8 


7 


11.59 


720 


43 


62.1 


156 


679 


29 106 


4,705 


67 


Waushncum, 


393 


172 


207 


6 


3 


7.35 


522 


1,433 


71.0 


137 


361 


16 


47 


3,248 


54 


French Hill, 


38 
1,746 


35 


- 


2 


1 
45 


3.14 


136 


- 


43.3 
49.0 


28 


78 


23 
110 


4 
753 


930 


11 


Totals, 


1,298 


258 


82 


5,764 


2,384 


1,412 


4,506 


38,062 


553 



* In the first column are also included 42 mills, carpenter shops, blacksmith shops, etc., and 21 
cemeteries. 
f Exclusive of persons employed in connection with the construction of the Wachusett Reservoir. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



191 



A summary of the work of sanitary inspection done in 1902 is given 
in the three following tables. The first table shows the number of prem- 
ises inspected, the classification of cases inspected, and the condition 
of the premises at the end of the year for the Wachusett watershed. 

The second table gives the corresponding information for the 
Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds. 

The headings of these tables explain themselves, except in a few in- 
stances ; under the heading ' * Suspected " are included all cases where 
positive information could not be obtained, and where it is suspected 
that there may be some objectionable drainage ; under the heading 
" Premises Vacant " are included all cases which at present furnish no 
objectionable drainage, but which might furnish such drainage if the 
premises were occupied; under the heading " Unsatisfactory " are 
included all cases where there may be, under the most unfavorable 
conditions, wash from privies or direct sink drainage, all suspected 
cases and all cases of manufacturing wastes entering feeders, even 
though there may be some attempt at previous purification. 

The third table shows the improvements effected on the Sudbury 
and Cochituate watersheds in 1902. No cases are entered as rem- 
edied unless complete sewer connections have been made or all 
probability of future contamination has been removed, and no cases 
are entered as partly remedied except where positive improvement 
in ttfe sanitary condition has been effected. 



Summary of Sanitary Inspections on the Wachusett Watershed in 1902. 









■ 

■ 

a 

V 

(U 

o ^ 
«> 

& a. 

e ■ 


Classification of Cases inspected. 


Condition 

at Knd of 

Year. 


DISTRICT. 


60 
1 *C O 
1 ao r-l 

o « 

8-3 

o 


a 
■o 

a 

C Ol 

00 ,-, 

x — 

o 


>> 

> 

T 05 

0-1 08 

a 

CJ 03 

iQ 
Q 


>> 

> 

Ph m 

«J .2 

£ ■ 

■oQ 
a 


S 

J4 CS 

c .- 

m g 

u 

5 


to 

•- c 

a 
i— i 


ao 
— 

9 

5 
a 

CS 

3 


it) 

a 

*n 

<£* OD 
S 58 

cfe 


c 
<s 
o 

a 

a> 


>> 

s- 
O 
«3 
O 
08 

«M 
as 

"3 

02 


>» 

u 
o 
o 

OS 

«t-l 
as 

a 

OD 

a 
P 


French Brook, 
Muddy Brook, 
Gates Brook, 
Maiden Bruok, 
Chaffin Brook, 
Asnebumskit Brook, . 
Hduequapoag Brook, 
South Wachuhett Brook, 
Trout Brook, 
EaBt Wnchiieett Brook, 
Stillwater River, . 
Wauehacum, 
French Hill, . 






88 

31 

121 

18 

143 

262 

100 

89 

49 

209 

169 

179 

37 


35 

8 

43 

7 

26 

93 

18 

15 

4 

42 

52 

50 

14 

; 407 


19 

3 

9 

1 
2 
1 

35 


2 

1 

4 
1 
1 
3 

12 


2 

3 

5 

10 
5 
5 
3 
9 
10 
6 
1 

69 


2 
1 

4 

7 
30 

4 
1 
6 
9 
59 
1 

84 


10 

8 

20 

2 

34 

25 

22 

7 

5 

26 

24 

24 

6 

213 


33 
20 
56 
14 
81 

109 
57 
43 
28 

113 
75 
67 
17 

713 


1 
2 
1 

1 

1 

6 


8 
2 
3 

2 
11 
11 

8 

5 

16 

8 
6 
2 

82 


83 

29 

112 

16 

125 

214 

87 

79 

45 

192 

154 

150 

33 


5 

2 

9 

2 

18 

48 

13 

10 

4 

17 

15 

29 

4 










1,319 


176 



Note. — On some premises there are two or more cases. 



192 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Summary of Sanitary Inspections on the Sudbury and Cochituate Water- 
sheds in 1902. 



DISTRICT. 



Sudbury Watershed. 

Farm Pond 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 

Stony Brook, 

Angle Brook, 

Framingham reservoirs Nos. 1 and 

2, and Cold Spring Brook, 
Eastern Sudbury, . 

Indian Brook 

Western Sudbury, . 
Whitehall Reservoir, 
Cedar Swamp, 

Cochituate Watershed. 

Snake Brook 

Pegan Brook, 

Course Brook, 

Beaver Dam Brook, . 

Totals 



V 




















Condition 


a 


Classification 


of Cases inspected. 


AT kND OF 


















Year. 


a. 


to 


so 


>» 


>> 








60 






s*» 


* 


•H*» 


3 




> 




JA St, 


x 


c 


a 




>H 




73 => 

§2 


T3 

GO . 


0,g 


S3 


M c3 

33*2 


.2 « 


3) 


3 . 
*» x 

S2 


a! 
o 


la 

O 

Q 


o 
o 


js a, 

as 

3." 




C oj 

x O 


CJ CO 

±0 


=5 ft 


so 

CO 


«2 

>3 


3 
B 

CD 


«+-• QQ 

p OS 


a 


es 


so 

a 


fc 


o 


O 


Q 


i— i 


5 


i— i 


3 


S 


£ 


QQ 


fc> 


3 


1 












1 






3 




7 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


■ - 


_ 


4 


3 


67 


33 


2 


- 


- 


2 


3 


11 


_ 


3 


50 


7 


359 


190 


9 


1 


2 


8 


68 


30 


5 


29 


300 


59 


28 


16 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


2 


_ 


3 


25 


3 


37 


21 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


2 


- 


10 


35 


2 


47 


22 


- 


- 


- 


3 


11 


5 


_ 


4 


34 


13 


25 


13 


- 


- 


2 


- 


6 


4 


1 


- 


18 


7 


5 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


_ 


3 


2 


53 


30 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


- 


1 


3 


44 


9 


37 


15 


2 




3 


. 


11 


5 




1 


26 


11 


145 


47 


1 


- 


2 


2 


12 


12 


3 


4 


132 


13 


6 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


1 


4 


2 


109 


62 


- 


- 


2 
11 


3 

18 


20 
155 


12 

88 


3 


3 


86 


23 


918 


462 


16 


1 


13 


61 


764 


154 



* Not including a large number of premises which were found on examination to be in a satisfactory 
sanitary condition, and likely to remain so. On some premises there are two or more cases. 



Sanitary Improvements effected on the Sudbury and Cochituate Watersheds 

in 1902. 



DISTRICT. 



Remedied by 

Hewer 
Connection. 



Otherwise 
remedied. 



Partly 
remedied. 



Cesspools 

abandoned 

on Account of 

Sewer 
Connections. 



Sudbury Watershed. 

Farm Pond, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, . 

Stony Bruok, 

Angle Brook 

Framingham reservoirs Nos.l and 2, and Cold 

Spring Brook, 

Eastern Sudbury 

Indian Brook 

Western Sudbury, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Cedar Swamp 

Cochituate Watershed. 

Snake Brook, 

Pegan Brook, 

Course Brook, 

Beaver Dam Brook 

Totals, 



35 



13 

63 
25 



136 



17 



35 



12 

60 
23 



130 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 193 

There still remains on the Wachusett watershed one mill dis- 
charging polluting material into the stream, of which the owner not 
only refuses to remove the pollution himself, but also to allow the 
Board to remove it. Legal proceedings have been begun to compel 
this abatement. 

In those towns where there are sewers, every endeavor has been 
made through the local boards of health to have unconnected houses 
connected with the sewers, and satisfactory progress has been made. 

In Natick fixtures have been installed and sewer connections 
made with 63 houses, against 73 the previous year. 

In Marlborough there have been 35 connections, against 44 the 
previous year. 

In South Framingham 25 houses have been connected, against 28 
the previous year. 

The new low-level sewer along Beaver Dam Brook has made little 
progress, except in the completion of the crossing under the Sudbury 
Aqueduct, already described. There yet remains a short section to 
be laid along Herbert Street before house connections can be made 
with it, but there is now no apparent reason why the sewer should 
not be available early next summer. 

In Westborough 13 sewer connections have been made, against 
17 the previous year. 

Drainage of Savamps. 

No additional ditches have been built during the year 1902. No 
material repairs have been made during the year to the ditches on 
the Sudbury watershed, but it has been necessary to replace some 
of the stone paving on the sides of the ditches on the Wachusett 
watershed where disturbed by cattle crossing them. The ditches 
tributary to the open channel, which have an aggregate length of 
15.55 miles, have required, most of the time, two men to keep 
them in good condition, and in addition a foreman and Hve laborers 
worked for two weeks cutting bushes for a width of 25 feet on each 
side of the ditches. 

Observations of the color of water from Crane Swamp and from 
the swamp southwest of Marlborough Junction, before and after 
draining, have been given in previous reports. For the year 1902 
the average colors were, respectively, 1.08 and 0.61, which are 
substantially the same as for the previous year. 



194 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Distributing Reservoirs. 
The distributing reservoirs maintained by the Board are the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Waban Hill Reservoir and Forbes Hill 
Reservoir and Standpipe, of the southern high-service system; Spot 
Pond and the Mystic Reservoir near Tufts College, of the low- 
service system ; the Fells Reservoir and Bear Hill Reservoir, of the 
northern high-service system ; and the Arlington Standpipe, of the 
northern extra high-service system. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

The grounds around this reservoir constitute in effect a part of 
the park system, and are resorted to by great numbers of people, 
especially on Sundays and holidays. They have received the usual 
amount of care, and have been kept in good order. All the iron- 
work in the gate-houses has been painted. The force employed 
upon the maintenance of the reservoir has also assisted in cleaning 
the Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts. 

A large amount of labor has been required to clean the screens in 
effluent gate-house No. 2, through which nearly all the water used 
in the Metropolitan District is drawn. The screens have been 
largely rebuilt during the year, using a No. 3 mesh copper wire 
netting of No. 15 gage wire. Late in the year a rack extending 
about 3 feet below the surface of the water was built outside the 
gate-house, to intercept leaves and other floating substances which 
had previously clogged the screens. 

Waban Hill Reservoir. 
This reservoir has been in use throughout the year, and is now in 
good condition with the exception of the grass on the embankments, 
which was in very poor condition when the reservoir was purchased. 
Considerable labor, loam and fertilizing material have been used in 
an endeavor to obtain a good sod upon the embankments, but the 
results have thus far not been satisfactory. 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe. 

The reservoir has been kept full of water in readiness for use in 

case of emergency, excepting from October 21 to November 17, 

while it was being cleaned. About 17 cubic yards of wet loamy 

material was removed from the reservoir, the greater part of which 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 195 



blew into the reservoir from off the embankments before the grass 
had orrown. The cost of cleaning was about $100. 

The standpipe was shut off on May 18, emptied, and thoroughly 
scraped and cleaned on both outside and inside. The inside of the 
standpipe was then given a coat of red lead and linseed oil, and 
afterward two coats of Gilsonite varnish. All rusty places on the 
outside were given a priming coat of red lead, after which the whole 
outside was painted with two coats of white lead and oil paint of 
a gray color. The cleaning and painting were done by Sylvester 
Brothers, at a cost of $427.61. 

While the standpipe was emptied it was discovered that there 
were voids between the steel plates and the concrete base. To 
remedy this, eleven holes were drilled through the bottom and 
tapped for 1-inch pipe. Through these holes, by the use of a force 
pump, cement grout, made with 5 parts of Portland cement, 3 parts 
of fine sand, with water enough to make a liquid mixture, was forced 
into the cavities until they were filled. About 9% barrels of cement 
were used for this work. 

Spot Pond. 

On January 1, 1902, the elevation of the surface of the water in 
the pond was 163.78 feet above Boston City Base, or 0.78 of a foot 
above high-water mark. During the months of January and Feb- 
ruary, in order to avoid drawing water of unsatisfactory quality from 
Lake Cochituate, a portion of the supply was taken from Spot Pond, 
and its level was thereby lowered about 4.5 feet, to elevation 159.21 
on February 26. The pond was gradually filled during March, 
reaching high- water mark on April 9, from which time until the 
early part of December it remained at or near high-water mark. 
The extreme cold weather about the middle of December, by increas- 
ing the water consumption beyond the capacity of the aqueducts, 
caused a lowering of the pond of about 0.7 of a foot. Before the end 
of the year a portion of this loss had been regained, and on December 
31 the surface of the pond was 0.3 of a foot below high-water mark. 

The exterior woodwork and roofs of two of the stone dwelling 
houses on the southerly shore of the pond have been thoroughly 
repaired and the woodwork painted. The stone house and barn on 
what was formerly the Wheildon estate have been taken down, the 
cellars filled and the ground loamed and seeded. Considerable time 
has been devoted to repairing riprap along the shore of the pond, cut- 
ting dead trees, and to destroying both brown-tail and gypsy moths. 



196 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Mystic Reservoir. 

A new flight of steps has been placed at the northeast corner of 
the reservoir, and both reservoir and grounds are now in good con- 
dition. 

Fells Reservoir. 

This reservoir has been in constant use, and is now in good order. 
The ironwork of the gate-house floor has been painted. 

Bear Hill Reservoir. 

This reservoir was filled and placed in service on June 28, and has 
since been in constant use. The embankments were seeded in August, 
with very good results. 

Mystic Lake. 

An attendant has been kept at the lake to control the flow of water 
over the dam, and to care for the buildings and other property. 
The gate-house roof has been repaired, and a large hole below the 
dam, which was made by the water during freshets, has been filled 
with stones taken from a ledge on adjoining property of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Pipe Yards. 

At both the Glenwood and Chestnut Hill pipe yards, pipes and 
special castings have been received and delivered for the several 
contracts in progress. The buildings at the Glenwood yard are in 
good condition. New ties and a few new rails were put in the side 
track at the yard, at a cost of $100.30. At the Chestnut Hill yard 
a wooden building, used as a carpenter and blacksmith shop, was 
destroyed by fire on June 18. A new building of somewhat larger 
size has been built for use as a carpenter shop and storehouse, and 
the blacksmith shop has been placed in another building. The new 
building was built by the maintenance force, with the exception of 
slating the roof. 

The vehicles at both yards are in good order. A new one-horse 
caravan was purchased in November. Two horses which were unfit 
for use have been exchanged, and the number in the department is 
10, as at the close of the year 1901. 

Pipe Lines. 
At the close of the year there were 82.09 miles of pipe lines 
owned and operated by the Board. 



No. 57.] AXD SEWERAGE BOARD. 197 

The principal items of work in connection with the maintenance 
of the pipe lines have been the relaying of the 16-inch pipe line 
supplying Winthrop and Breed's Island, which was made necessary 
by the abolition of the grade crossing of Winthrop Avenue and the 
Boston & Maine Railroad, and the raising of two 36-inch pipe lines 
at the crossing of the Mvstic River between Somerville and Med- 
ford. At the crossing of the Boston & Maine Railroad in Revere 
1,135.5 feet of 16-inch pipes were laid and 942.5 feet taken up, the 
increase in length being due to the laying of the pipes outside the 
line of the street in land of the Metropolitan Park Commission and 
the Boston & Maine Railroad. By this plan the pipes were laid 
alongside of the street under the railroad tracks, instead of over 
the bridge, and the maintenance of a temporary line during the con- 
struction of the bridge was avoided. This work, done by the main- 
tenance force, cost $1,610.58. 

At the Wellington Bridge crossing the Mystic River between 
Somerville and Medford the Metropolitan Park Commission is now 
building a bridge to replace the present structure, and in doing this 
work is constructing new abutments about 250 feet nearer the centre 
of the river than the present abutments on the Somerville shore. As 
the two lines of 36-inch pipes which were laid alongside the old 
bridge on a pile foundation below the river bed would be covered 
with earth by the new construction to a depth of from 8 to 17 feet, 
and as this was deemed for several reasons to be undesirable, the 
pipes have been raised and supported upon a new pile foundation. 
A contract for excavating the mud from around the pipes in the river 
and for building a coffer-dam and a pile trestle was made with Lawler 
Brothers of Charlestown on September 26. The work of dredging 
was begun on October 2 and finished October 27, after which piles 
were driven in bents of three, the bents being spaced 6 feet apart 
along the pipe. The alternate bents were capped with 4-inch by 
10-inch double-girder caps, placed about 2 feet above the eleva- 
tion to which the pipes were to be raised. Screws 8 feet long, pass- 
ing through cast-iron plates bearing upon these caps and secured by 
wire ropes and chains to the pipes below at intervals of 12 feet, were 
used for raising the pipes to their new position, they having been 
first cut at each end of the section to be raised. After one line had 
been raised, 12-inch by 12-inch solid caps were placed under the 
pipes at intervals of 12 feet, the connections made at either end, 
and the line placed in service. The second line was cut, raised, 



198 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

supported and connected in a similar manner. When this had been 
done, 6-inch by 12-inch double-girder caps were placed under both 
lines of pipes on the bents of piles which had been used in raising 
the pipes, thus giving bearings every 6 feet along the pipe line. 
With the exception of the dredging, trestle and coffer-dam, all the 
work was done by the maintenance force ; and the whole cost, in- 
cluding the contract work, was $5,644.08. 

The construction of the large Metropolitan sewer in Adams Street 
in Milton and Quincy, in close proximity to the 24-inch main sup- 
plying the city of Quincy, has required considerable attention for 
fear of possible damage to the pipe line. On account of this con- 
struction, portions of this pipe line are now laid in temporary loca- 
tions ; and there has been considerable settlement of the pipes, 
amounting to about 12 inches, for a distance of between 250 and 300 
feet. As soon as weather will permit in the spring the temporary 
pipes are to be taken up, and the line raised and placed in good 
order. 

But one break occurred on the pipe system during the year. This 
took place on Main Street near Ellis Avenue in Maiden, on August 
21, when a 30-inch pipe under about 96 pounds pressure split 
throughout its entire length, and a piece of pipe having an area of 
about 14 square feet was broken entirely away from the remainder 
of the pipe. Fortunately, the water which escaped during the thirty 
minutes before the gates were closed passed oft' into drains and sew- 
ers without doing serious damage to property. The streets and 
sidewalks in the vicinity were somewhat washed. So far as could 
be determined, the break was due to a point of the ledge through 
which the pipes had been laid bearing against the side of one of the 
pipes. The total cost of repairing the break, including damages to 
property, was $469.21. 

During the year 10 leaks, due to defective joints, have been re- 
paired, at a cost of $469.17. 

In connection with the maintenance and operation of the pipe 
lines, the valves regulating the elevation of water in the Chelsea 
and Revere reservoirs have been examined and cleaned ; and the 
Ross pressure-regulating valves on the pipes supplying Swampscott, 
Xahant and Revere have been cleaned and adjusted from time to time, 
as required. On October 10 the new standpipe built by the town 
of Xahant was placed in service, and in order to prevent its over- 
flow, the pressure on the delivery side of the regulating valve was 



No. 57.] AND* SEWERAGE BOARD. 199 

reduced from 79 pounds to 62 pounds. The pressure-recording 

gages in use at different points on the pipe system have been 

tested. 

Electrolysis. 

On account of the large amount of construction work in progress 
during the year, very little time of the engineering force has been 
devoted to surveys or studies relative to the electrolysis of the 
water pipes. The return current on the cables of the Boston Ele- 
vated Railway Company at the crossing of the Charles River at the 
North Harvard Street Bridge was discovered to be grounded, passing 
into and thus endangering the pipes crossing the river at this point. 
The matter was reported to the railway company in June, and 
measurements taken in July indicated that the leakage of electricity 
had been stopped. In June a communication was received from 
the railway company, asking for the cooperation of the Board in 
making experimental tests of methods of preventing the electrolytic 
action on our 48-inch main in the vicinity of the North Harvard 
Street power station ; and, after conferences to consider the pro- 
posed plan, permission was given the railway company to proceed 
with the work. An attempt has been made to protect the pipes at 
three points where it was thought the greatest damage was being 
done. One section 26 feet long, located opposite the power station, 
one 77 feet long crossed by three lines of tracks entering a car 
house, and one 39 feet long under two lines of track at a curve near 
Eliot Street, have been treated in the following manner : The pipes 
were first thoroughly cleaned with scrapers and wire brushes. A 
coat of asphalt paint was then applied, and over this a layer of 
Warren's " Kiola rock asphalt wire composition" was applied hot. 
A sheet of burlap was then wrapped around the pipe, and over 
this another layer of the hot asphalt was put on. The insulation 
was applied in short sections, which overlapped about 6 inches at 
the junction lines, and when completed was from ^4 to % an inch 
in thickness. As the trench was refilled, three lines of old tram 
rails were laid in the trench parallel with the axes of the pipes, and 
about 6 inches from the bells at the nearest point. These rails were 
connected to the pipe line by means of " 0000 " copper bonds sold- 
ered to the pipe bells near the ends of each insulated section. The 
rails were also connected at the ends with similar copper bonds. 
Where the pipe line was located under the car tracks, the rails were 
placed in a horizontal plane directly over the pipes, and opposite 



200 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



the power station where there are no tracks in the street they were 
placed in a vertical plane. Arrangements have been made so that 
the amount of electricity flowing off from the rails can be measured, 
and also the amount flowing on the pipes. All of the pipes insu- 
lated showed the effects of the electrolytic action, and some of them 
had been very badly damaged. Careful measurements and plaster 
of Paris impressions of many of the pittings were made, for future 
reference. On one pipe there were about 80 pittings, varying in 
size from circles *4'of an ^ ncn in diameter to bands 30 inches long 
by 1 inch to 1% inches in width, and from % 6 of an inch to %g of 
an inch in depth. 

No special investigations have been made of the condition of the 
pipes in Broadway in Chelsea and Broadway in Lynn, near the 
power stations of the Boston & Northern Street Railway Company ; 
but it is probable that the injury to the pipes discovered at these 
points in 1901 has continued during the past year. 



Prevention or Waste. 

During the summer months inspections were made throughout the 
Metropolitan District for the purpose of observing violations of the 
regulations relating to the use of hand hose. The regulations forbid 
the use of hand hose between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., and 
the use of revolving or fixed sprinklers at all times unless the water 
is metered. The inspections were made between the hours of 8 a.m. 
and 5 p.m., and the number and character of the violations reported 
are shown in the following table : — 

Violations of Hose Regulations in Metropolitan Water District between May 

27 and September 16. 



% 


Rotary 
Sprinkler. 


Fixed 
Sprinkler. 


Hose on 

Fixed 

Support. 


Hose held 

in 

Hand. 


Totals. 


Violations 

per 1,000 

Inhabitants. 


Boston, 

Arlington, . 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Nahant, 

Quincy, 

Revere, 

Somerville, . 

Stoneham, . 

Swampscolt, 

Winthrop, . 






6 
2 

4 

199 

13 

149 

5 

i 

3 

60 


12 
2 

196 

36 

1 

5 

1 

27 


18 

1 

13 

235 

18 

2 
16 

8 
16 

1 
20 

2 


59 
7 
9 

25 
146 

41 

14 

17 
4 

58 
3 

55 
8 


95 
11 
10 
42 

776 
72 

201 

39 

12 

87 

8 

162 
10 


.16 

1.17 

.28 

1.57 

38.60 
5.30 

62.81 
1.51 
1.01 
1.33 
1.27 

23.48 
1.45 


Totals, . 




■ 


449 


280 


350 


446 


1,525 


- 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



201 



An inspection of the table shows very plainly that the number of 
violations was very large in a few municipalities, and especially so 
in proportion to the population. The revolving lawn sprinklers, 
when allowed to run continuously, as is often done, use or waste 
large quantities of water, and in several municipalities these were 
found to be quite generally used. Violations of the regulations 
were reported to the water officials in the several cities and towns, 
and as the season advanced there was a decrease in the number re- 
ported, especially in the number of rotary and fixed sprinklers. 
This is shown by the following table : — 

Number of Violations reported during the Months of June, July and August. 



June. 



July. 



August. 



Rotary sprinklers. 
Fixed sprinklers, 
Hose on fixed support, 
Hose held in hand, 
Totals, . 



264 
116 
172 
168 



720 



93 

95 

86 

106 



380 



60 

51 

70 

135 

316 



Measurements of the consumption of water in the town of Stone- 
ham made during the early part of the year showed that it was about 
790,000 gallons per day, or nearly 125 gallons per inhabitant. 
There is very little water used in the town for manufacturing pur- 
poses, and there appeared to be no good reason for so large a con- 
sumption ; but the local authorities were not able to discover any 
leaks, either in the street mains and services or in the house plumb- 
ing, which would account for any considerable part of the water 
consumed. In order to localize the waste, the pipe system was 
divided into small sections, which could be supplied during the 
night through a meter placed in a line of 2%-inch fire hose between 
two hydrants. By this method a number of leaks from the street 
mains which gave no surface indications were discovered and re- 
paired ; and during October, November and December the daily 
average consumption was about 320,000 gallons, showing a saving 
of 470,000 gallons per day. On the high-service district of Arling- 
ton similar measurements have been made, and a few leaks have 
been found, the saving being about 30,000 gallons per day. 



202 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Clinton Sewerage. 

The works have been in daily operation during the whole year. 
The amount of sewage pumped and filtered has been about 50,000 
gallons per day less than during the previous year, the decrease 
being largely due to the discontinuance of a very leaky piece of 
12-inch vitrified pipe sewer, which has since been reconstructed and 
again connected with the sewerage system of the town. 

The regular force has been one engineer at the pumping station 
and two attendants at the filter-beds, one of the latter assisting the 
engineer at the pumping station a short time each morning. When 
additional help is required to furrow the beds, in the summer time 
to keep down the weeds or for other work, men employed on the 
maintenance of the Wachusett Aqueduct are transferred temporarily. 

Following are statistics relating to the operation of the pumping 
station : — 



Daily average quantity of sewage pumped (gallons) 
Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Number of days pumping, . 
Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs and supplies, 

Total for station, . 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



786,000 

1,189 

661 

365 

81,084 51 

1,186 15 

120 33 

$2,390 99 

$ 8 34 
18 



Filter-beds. 

During the warmer part of the year sewage was applied to the 
beds from which no soil was removed in about the same quantity 
per bed as to the 19 beds from which all soil was removed, but the 
former beds have not been used during the colder part of the year. 

The sewage was pumped only during the day time. The method 
of applying the sewage varies with the season of the year. During 
the warmer portion of the year, say from May 1 to November 28, 
the sewage was applied to the beds at a rate which averaged about 
27,000 gallons per acre per day. For the first half hour after be- 
ginning pumping in the morning, when the sewage contains more 
sludge than at other times, it was turned upon a single bed, which 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



203 



was frequently cleaned. The remainder of the beds were used in 
rotation, and all the sewage pumped was run upon a single bed for 
about 1% hours, which made the amount per application about 209,- 
000 gallons, and caused each bed to be used about once in 8 days. 
During the colder portion of the year the method depended upon 
whether the temperature was below or above 15° above zero. On 
days when the temperature was below this point, all the sewage was 
turned upon one of 5 improved beds which had been prepared with 
furrows 3 feet 6 inches apart. The average amount of sewage per 
application was 752,000 gallons, and each furrowed bed was used 
about once in 12 days. When the temperature was higher than 15° 
above zero, the sewage was applied to the beds which had not been 
furrowed, at a rate of 358,000 gallons per application, and each 
bed was used about once in 10 days. 

During previous years the results obtained during the last half of 
the year have been better than during the first half, but this year 
the reverse is true, as will be seen by the following results of chem- 
ical analyses : — 

[Parts per 100,000.] 



January to 

June, 
inclusive. 



July to 
December, 
inclusive. 



Whole 
Year. 



Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, 
Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 
Per cent, removed, 
Oxygen consumed, sewage, 
Oxygen consumed, effluent, 
Per cent, removed, 



1.0117 

0.0772 
90 
9.92 
1.01 



1.0917 

0.1009 
88 

7.77 

1.29 
80 



1.0517 

0.0891 
89 

8.85 

1.15 
84 



The percentage of organic matter removed during the last half of 
the year has not been as large as in previous years. 

The nitrification during the last half of the year continues to be 
better than during the first half, but the difference is less marked 
than in previous years. The extent of the nitrification is indicated 
by the following statement of the amount of free ammonia and 
nitrates : — 

[Parts per 100,000.] 



January to 

June, 
inclusive. 



July to 
December, 
inclusive. 



Free ammonia, sewage, 
Free ammonia, effluent, . 
Per cent, removed, . 
Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, 



3.5950 
0.7014 
78 
0.7500 



5.0617 
0.6709 
85 
1.2130 



204 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The cost of maintaining the filter-beds has been as follows : — 



■o 



Labor, $2,277 01 

Repairs and supplies, . . * 67 43 

Total, $2,344 44 

Cost per million gallons filtered, 8 29 



Appended to this report are tables of contracts giving the amount 
of jvork done and other information, a statement of the cement 
tests, a Ions series of tables relating to the maintenance of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Works, tables showing the length of main pipes 
and number of service pipes, meters and fire hydrants in the Metro- 
politan Water District, and a summary of statistics for 1902. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Boston, January 1, 1903. 



F. P. STEARNS, 

Chief Engineer. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



205 



EEPOET OF ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the operations of the 
Engineering Department of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works for 
the year ending December 31, 1902. 



ORGANIZATION. 

The engineering organization at the end of the year is as fol- 
lows : — 



Division Engineers : — 
Frederick D. Smith, 

Frank I. Capen, . 



C. Barton Pratt, . 

Francis L. Sellew, 

Seth Peterson, 

Frank A. Emery, . 

Assistant Engineer : — 
John S. Hodgson, . 

Stenographer : — 

Henry P. Fielding, 



In charge of maintenance, South Metropolitan 
System, and construction of High-level Sewer, 
in Quincy. 

In charge of construction, High-level Sewer, day- 
work sections 6-i and 67 in Milton and Hyde 
Park, and contract sections 77 and 78 in Rox- 
bury, and of maintenance and construction, 
North Metropolitan System. 

In charge of construction, High-level Sewer, sec- 
tions 65 to 76, inclusive, in Hyde Park, West 
Roxbury and Roxbury, and of Section 30, Ne- 
ponset River valley intercepter. 

In charge of construction, High-level Sewer, sec- 
tions 47 to 50, inclusive, in Quincy. 

In charge of construction, High-level Sewer, sec- 
tions 51 to 63, inclusive, in Quincy and Milton. 

In charge of draughting rooms and records. 



In charge of special studies. 



In charge of classification of engineering reports, 
claims and correspondence. 



In addition to the above, there are employed 68 engineering and 
other assistants. 



206 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 

Areas and Populations. 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
sewerage districts, the areas of which remain at 85 square miles for 
the North and 102 square miles for the South district, a total, inclu- 
sive of water surfaces, of 187 square miles. 

The development of this area from the original district of 114 
square miles, created by chapter 439 of the Acts of 1889 referred to 
in the last report, now includes the whole or parts of twenty-four 
cities and towns, as set forth in the folio win & table : — 

Table showing Areas and Estimated Populations within the Metropolitan Sewerage 

District^ as of May 1, 1902. 



CITY OR TOWN. 



Area (Square 
Miles) . 



Estimated Popu- 
lation. 



2.2 



("Arlington, . 

Belmont, 

Boston (portions of), 

Cambridge, . 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington,* 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Somervllle, . 

Stoneham, . * 

Wakefield, . 

Winchester, 

Winthrop, . 
iWoburn, 



o . 
o.2 



f Boston (portions of), 

Brookline, . 

Dedham,* . . 

Hyde Park, 
ii-j Milton, 

Newton, 

Quincy, 

Waltham, . 
(. Watertown, 



So 



o 

CO 



Totals, 



5.20 
4.66 
3.45 
6.11 
2.24 
3.34 
5.11 
5.07 
8.35 
3.73 
96 
50 
65 
95 
61 



12.71 



84.64 



20.92 

6.81 

9.40 

4.57 

12.59 

18.03 

12.56 

13.63 

4.04 



102.55 
187.19 



9,600 

4,700 
89,400 
98,000 
35,700 
27,600 

2,800 
36,500 
20,700 
13,800 
66,900 

6,400 
10,000 

8,000 

7,200 
14,800 
452,100 



140,200 
23,000 

7,200 
14,100 

7,300 
37,200 
26,500 
25,600 
10,700 



291,700 
743,800 



* Part of town. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed, and their Connections. 

Within the Sewerage District there are now 89.32 miles of Met- 
ropolitan sewers. Of this total, 8.79 miles of sewer with the 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



207 



Quincy pumping station have been purchased from cities and towns 
of the District, the remaining 80.53 miles of Metropolitan sewer 
having been constructed by Metropolitan boards. 

The position, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public 
and special connections with the system : — 

North Metropolitan System. 



CITY OR 
TOWN. 



Size of Sewers. 



Boston : — 
Deer Island, 
East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Winthrop, . 



Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Maiden, 

Melrose, 
Oambridge, 

Somerville, 

Medford, . 

Winchester, 

Stoneham, . 
Woburn, 
Arlington, . 
Belmont, § . 
Wakefield, § 



6' 3" to 9', 



9'tol', . 
6M"x7'5"to 1', 
9',. . . 



8/ 4"X9' 2" to 1' 10" X 2' 4", 

8' 2"X8' 10" to 4' 8"X5' 1", 

3' 9"X4' 1" to V 3", . 

I'10"x2'9"to 10", . 
5'2"X5'9"to i'3", . 

V 5"X7' 2*' to 1' 10"X2' 3", 

4'8"X5' l"to 10", 

2'll"x3'3"to 1'3", 

1' 3" to 10", . 

1' 10"X2' 4" to 1' 3", 

1' 6" to 10", . 



5-S 

si 

a 






So 

= a 

= — 

- 



2?S 



1.367 



5.467 
3.292 
2.864 



3.787 

2.925 

3.931* 

6.099t 
5.963 

3.471 

5.359 

6.403 

.010 

.933 

3.520J 

55.391|| 



4 
16 

12 

7 

r 



Special Connections. 



23 

28 
20 

i„ | 

19 

"I 

3 

3 

31 

1 

200 



Character or Location of 
Connection. 



Number 

in 
Opera- 
tion. 



Navy Yard, 
Almshouse, 

Club house, 

Bakery, 

Rendering works, i 
Metropolitan Waterworks 
blow-off, . 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, 
Private houses, . 

Private houses, . 

Slaughter-house, 
City Hospital, 

Slaughter-houses (3), 
Car-house, . 

Private houses, . 

Tannery, 
Private houses, . 



Glue factory, 
Private houses, 



1 
97 

96 



1 

83 



303 



* Includes .988 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden, 
t Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Melrose. 
X Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 
§ The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 
|| Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic River valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running 
parallel with the Metropolitan sewer. 



208 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 



CITY OR 

TOWN. 



Size of Sewers. 



s> 



Boston (Back 
Bay). 

Boston (Brigh- 
ton). 

Boston (Dor- 
chester). 

Boston (Rox- 
bury). 

Boston (West 
Roxbury). 

Brookline, 
Dedbara, . 
Hyde Park, 
Milton, 
Newton, . 
Quincy, . 
Waltham, 
Watertown, 



6' 6" to 5' 6", 
5' 6" to 12", . 



3'X4' to 2' 6"X2' 7", 
6' 6"X7', 2' 0", . 

9' 3"X10' 2" to 12", 



5' 6", .... 

4'X4' 1" to 3' 9"X3' 10", 

10'7"XH'7" to4'X4'l", 

ll'Xl2'to8", 

4'2"X4'9"tol'3", 

11' 3" X 12' 6" to 60" pipe, 

3'6"X4', 

4' 2"X4' 9" to 12", 



1.500* 
3.714f 



2.870J 
1.042 

6.565 



127 
350 
511 
538 
910 
049 
.001 
• 750§ 



33.927 



2 S< 

Of*'-' 

° „~ 

O CD CO 
X> O <o 

CL, 



8 < 



10 



2 
3 
11 
3 
6 

1 
5 

58 



Special Connections. 



Character or Location of 
Connection. 



Number 

in 
Opera- 
tion. 



Private house, 

Administration building, 
Boston Park Department, . 
Private estate, 
Abattoir, 



Parental school, 

Lutheran Evangelical Church, 



Private buildings, 
Private houses, 



Factory, 



13 



* Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

t Includes .026 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

t Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

§ Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

Cost of Construction. 

The cost of the 89.32 miles of Metropolitan sewers enumerated 
above, including five pumping stations, siphons and appertaining 
structures, may be summarized as follows : * — 



North Metropolitan System, 
South Metropolitan System, 



£5,621,869 52 
5,542,032 10 



111,163,901 62 



Construction and Additions during the Year. 

The last report indicated that 82.47 miles of Metropolitan sewers 
had been constructed to December 31, 1901. There has conse- 
quently been added, during the year under review, a length of 6.85 
miles, wholly in the South Metropolitan district. This includes .93 
out of a total of 1.27 miles of brick and pipe sewers, authorized by 
chapter 204 of the Acts of 1901 to provide additional sewerage facili- 
ties for the city of Newton and the town of Brookline in the Nepon- 
set River valley system. The remaining length of 5.92 miles con- 



* For detailed statement of cost, see report of Board, p. 59. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



209 



sists of High-level Sewer, authorized by chapter 424 of the Acts of 
1899, and referred to in detail later in this report. 

The following table gives details of areas, populations, local 
sewer mileage and other data for the whole Metropolitan Sewerage 

System : — 

North Metropolitan System. 



Area 
(Square 


Estimated 

Total 
Population. 


Miles of 

Local Sewer 

connected. 


Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 


Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(PerCent.). 


Connections made 

with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 


Miles). 


Public. 


Special. 


84.64 


452,100 


503.46 


342,321 


76.0 


200 


303 



South Metropolitan System. 



102.55 



291,700 



366.42 



130,895 



44.9 



58 



13 



Entire Metropolitan District. 



187.19 



743,800 



869.88 



473,216 



63.6 



258 



316 



Of the estimated gross population of 743,800 on December 31, 
1902, 473,216, representing 63.6 per cent., were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 869.88 miles of local sewers owned by the individual municipali- 
ties. These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan system by 
258 public and 316 special connections. It appears, also, that there 
has been during the year an increase of 39.83 miles of local sewer 
connected with Metropolitan systems, and that 18 public and 22 
special connections have been added. 

Pumping Stations and Pumpage. 
The following table shows the average daily volume of sewage 
lifted at each of the five Metropolitan pumping stations during the 
year, as compared with corresponding volumes for the previous 
year : — 



PUMPING STATION. 



Average Daily Pumpage. 



Jan. 1, 1901, 

to 
Dec. 31, 1901. 



Jan. 1, 1902, 

to 
Dec. 31, 1902. 



Decrease during 
the Year. 



Deer Island, 

East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Alewife Brook 

Quincy, 

* Part of year. 



Gallons. 
53,100,000 
50,700,000 
31,000,000 
3,943,000 
2,014,000* 



Gallons. 
51,500,000 
49,500,000 
29,800,000 
3,742,000 
2,229,000 



=£ 



Gallons. 
1,600,000 
1,200,000 
1,200,000 
201,000 
215,000t 



Per Cent. 
3.01 
2.37 
3.87 
5.10 
10.67f 



t Increase. 



210 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



CONSTRUCTION ON THE NORTH METROPOLITAN 

SYSTEM. 

No additional Metropolitan sewers have been constructed on this 
system during the year. 

The additional pumping plant at the Alewife Brook pumping 
station, authorized by chapter 424 of the Acts of 1898, had been 
installed b}^ the contractor, the George F. Blake Manufacturing 
Company, previous to the date of the last report, but the full duty 
guaranteed had not been attained. The contractors having intro- 
duced various modifications in the plant, the tests specified in the 
contract were successfully made on March 28 and 29, and the 
plant was accepted by the Board. 

The contract involved an engine of the vertical, cross-compound 
type, having between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a 
horizontal axis, supplied with steam by a vertical boiler, 4 feet 8 
inches in diameter, together with the necessary steam piping and 
connections. The contract called for a capacity of 13,000,000 
gallons per day, raised to an elevation of 13 feet above the level of 
the sewage in the pump- well, and a guaranteed duty of 50,000,000 
foot-pounds. 

The final 24-hour tests gave the following results : — 

Time of run, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Average speed of engine (revolutions per minute), .... 216.40 

Average steam pressure (pounds), 121.30 

Indicated horse-power : — 

High pressure, 27.20 

Low pressure, 28.68 

Total, 55.88 

Total gallons pumped per twenty-four hours, 12,962,000 

Average lift (feet), 13.09 

Water horse-power, 29 . 83 

Efficiency of pumps (per cent.), 53.40 

Total coal burned (pounds), . .2,711.00 

Duty in foot-pounds per 100 pounds coal burned, 52,300,000 

Total feed-water evaporated (pounds), 22,562.50 

Evaporation per pound of coal (pounds), 8.32 

Evaporation per indicated horse-power per hour (pounds), . . . 16.80 

Equivalent evaporation from and at 212° from temperature of boiler 
feed (pounds), 8.50 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 211 



CONSTRUCTION ON THE SOUTH METROPOLITAN 

SYSTEM. 

This consists of the completion of the Neponset River Valley Sewer 
extension for the relief of areas in Newton and Brookline, author- 
ized by chapter 204 of the Acts of 1901, and of further progress on 
the High-level Sewer, authorized by chapter 424 of the Acts of 
1899, the latter work having been under construction since Novem- 
ber of that year. 

Neponset River Valley Sewer, West Roxbury and Newton. 

Section 30. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — C. Barton Pratt. 
Contractor. — Thomas J. Kelley, Brookline, Mass. 

About 1,800 feet of this section were constructed in 1901, referred 
to in the last report. The remaining 4,915 feet have been constructed 
during the year under review. The section was completed July 1, 
and includes 2,353 feet of 24-inch brick sewer and 2,651 feet of 18- 
inch and 1,711 feet of 15-inch pipe sewers, a total length of 6,715 feet. 

The average depth of excavation on the 24-inch and 15-inch sewers 
was about 10 feet, and on the 18-inch sewer about 8 feet. 

For a distance of 450 feet at the upper end of the section, north 
of Vine Street, the 15-inch sewer passes through a bog meadow. 
The pipes in this portion of the work are supported on piling, 
averaging 18 feet in length. 

Considerable difficulty was experienced in the low lands adjoining 
the brooks, owing to the flooding of the trenches by heavy rains and 
melting snows, involving delays of some weeks. 

The average rate of progress on the brick sewer was 62 feet per 
week, with a maximum of 190 feet. On pipe sewers the correspond- 
ing rates were 114 feet and (for two openings) 622 feet. 

High-level Sewer. 

The most important structural work of the department during the 
year includes the continuation of work on the High-level Sewer in 
progress at the date of the last report, and new construction for this 
system entered upon during the year. 



212 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Surveys and general studies in connection with this work have 
been completed during the year. The final location along the whole 
length of nearly 17 miles has been described in earlier reports. 

For purposes of construction, the High-level Sewer has been 
divided into 36 sections. The work on some of these embraces 
more than one contract, and a total of 46 constructional contracts 
is involved. Of these contracts, 29 have been completed and 12 
are in process of construction, leaving 5 yet to be advertised. 
These include the laying of a second line of harbor outfall, the 
construction of sewers in embankments already constructed on 
sections 44 and 46, and the laying of 48-inch force-mains from 
the Ward Street pumping station and a 24-inch force-main from the 
Quincy pumping station to the High-level Sewer. Particulars of 
the sections along the entire route, to date, are condensed in the 
following table : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



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218 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

This table indicates that, exclusive of the 24-inch Quincy force- 
main, the High-level Sewer will have, when completed, a length of 
16.83 miles, of which 16.04 miles have been contracted for in whole 
or in part. Of this length, 13.21 miles have been excavated to 
grade, in trench or tunnel, with the masonry sewer structure either 
fully completed or closely following the excavation in most of the 
sections. This leaves 2.83 miles on which excavation is at a less 
advanced stage or still to be begun, and .79 mile yet to be adver- 
tised. The table shows, further, that 12.75 miles of the total length 
of the High-level Sewer are designed to be constructed in open 
trench, the remaining 4.08 miles being in tunnel. The latter por- 
tion of the work will consist of 1.57 miles of earth tunnel and 2.51 
miles of rock tunnel. 

During the year approximately 27,000 cubic yards of rock have 
been excavated for sewer construction in tunnel and in open cut, 
and about 9,000 tons were quarried at Rock Island, in Quincy, for 
use in riprap, etc., on the adjacent sections 48 and 49. The above 
work, together with the loosening of compact earth on some sec- 
tions, has involved the use of about 34 tons of dynamite or other 
explosives during the year. 

Type of High-level Sewer, 

The cross-section of the High-level Sewer is generally of the 
horseshoe type, with slightly pointed arch and curved invert. The 
horizontal diameter is about nine-tenths of the vertical. The sewers 
built during the year vary from 11 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 6 inches 
to 6 feet 6 inches by 7 feet in diameter. Concrete is largely used 
for sidewalls and invert backing, with either one or two rings of 
brick lining, the latter being used where any considerable head of 
ground water is present. In some cases concrete is also used for 
the arch, but as a general rule this is of 12-inch brickwork. Rosen- 
dale cement is used, under favorable conditions, for the outer ring 
of brickwork and for the arch, also for concrete, but the inner ring 
of the invert is always built in Portland. The relative use of these 
two classes of cement is further referred to on page 244. 

A more detailed description of the work, as divided into sections, 
follows : — 











HIGH-LEVEL SEWER - Bringing Outfall Pipe off Nut Island into N^I 
Position for Lower/ng. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 219 



Section 43, Quincy and Hull.' 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frederick D. Smith. 
Contractor. — Hiram W. Phillips, Quincy, Mass. 

This section comprises the 60-inch cast-iron pipe outfalls, laid in 
trenches dredged in the bed of the harbor and extending from the 
outlets, at points one mile beyond low water, to the proposed 
screen-house near the northwesterly shore of Nut Island. Two 
lines, respectively 5,290 and 5,558 feet long, with outlets 1,500 
feet apart, are contemplated at. present, the shorter of these, known 
as the westerly line, being now under construction. The pipes 
were purchased by the Board under a separate contract, as noted in 
the last report, and stored at Barker's wharf, Quincy. They -are 
spigot and socket pipes, 1% inches thick, weighing 6 tons per 
standard 12-foot length. The contract for the dredging, laying, 
etc., was awarded May 28, 1902, and dredging was begun July 17. 

The bottom of the pipes will have an average depth of about 9 
feet below the bed of the harbor, and the trench is dredged 2 feet 
deeper, to a maximum of 53 feet below mean high water. The 
bottom of the trench is 10 feet wide, and the sides slope so as to 
give a mean top width of about 30 feet. The dredging is in stiff 
clay. In this trench 10- foot piles are driven in 5-foot bents of two 
piles each, at intervals of 6 feet. These are capped by spruce tim- 
bers set to the required grade, thus ensuring two points of support 
for each pipe. The piles are driven with the assistance of a vertical 
telescopic guide box, 35 feet long when closed, resting upon the bed 
of the harbor, and capable of adjustment to varying depths of trench 
and conditions of tide. In this contrivance, which was designed by 
the contractor, a cylindrical hammer, 10 feet long, descends upon a 
pile placed within the inner box. A 75-foot lighter is used for the 
pile-driving work. 

The pipes are laid in 48-foot sections, consisting of three lengths 
of ordinary spigot and socket pipes and one length having the spigot 
turned to a slight taper for a length of 5% inches. This spigot is 
temporarily inserted, upon the wharf, into the bell of a pipe which 
is to form the leading end of a section, and the lead space entirely 
filled with lead, but without calking. The spigot is then withdrawn, 
to be used as the rear end of the following section. The four pipes 
forming a section are then arranged, in" their proper order, upon 



220 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

a floating caisson, lashed to the side of a second lighter, the three 
ordinary joints being run and calked in the ordinary manner. The 
caisson is a heavy timber structure, of a special design patented by 
the contractor, 6 feet square outside and 52 feet long, built of 6-inch 
hard pine and divided by eight transverse bulkheads into nine com- 
partments, which can be separately flooded. On one face of the 
caisson eight timber saddles, shaped to the external contour of the 
pipes, serve as a resting place for the pipe section, which is firmly 
secured by chains and turnbuckles. When filled with water the 
caisson is sufficiently heavy to sink, but when empty its flotation 
is sufficient to support a section weighing about 24 tons. On being 
released from the lighter, the caisson immediately turns over, so 
that the pipes are suspended from it in the water. Then, through 
openings controlled by plugs, the compartments are sufficiently 
flooded to sink the whole. Arrived at the bottom, and still attached 
to the caisson, they are adjusted by divers to line and grade upon 
the caps, and the tapered spigot is drawn home into the leaded bell 
of the preceding section by means of ratchet-jacks, actuated by 
levers. For the latter purpose the leaded bell is temporarily fitted 
with a collar, provided with four guides to ensure the entry of the 
tapered spigot without damage to the lead mould. When the pipes 
are finally secured in position by wedges spiked to the pile caps, 
the caisson is filled with water, thus rendering it too heavy to float, 
and released from the completed section. It is then hauled to the 
surface by steam- winches on the lighters, and the water is forced 
out of the compartments by an air-pump. The special joint between 
the sections is calked before the excavated material is deposited 
from scows in the trench and over the pipes. 

The work was begun at the outlet, which consists of a special 
quadrant bend, about 11 feet in length and weighing nearly 11 tons, 
the thickness of metal being 2% inches. The outlet pipe is sur- 
rounded by a rectangular timber casing 13 feet square and 10 feet 
deep, projecting 2 feet beyond the extreme dimensions of the pipe 
and filled with Portland concrete. It rests upon 12 piles, 22 feet 
long, and is surmounted and surrounded by a cut granite ring, 30 
inches deep, in six pieces. Piling beyond the casing serves as a 
framework for a timber curbing, the interior space being covered 
by 18-inch slab paving laid upon coarse gravel filling, with its sur- 
face sloping from the top of the granite ring, which is about 2% 




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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 221 



feet above the harbor bed and 34 feet below high water. The pipes 
are laid in strong tidal currents, due to a mean tidal range of 10 
feet, which prevent continuous diving work. A total of 922 feet 
of pipe has been laid to date, and the trench has been dredged to 
full depth for a further distance of 900 feet. When work was sus- 
pended for the winter, on December 24, the ordinary rate of pipe 
laying in working weather was about 100 feet per week. 

Section 44, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frederick D. Smith. 

(1) Contractor/or filled embankments. — W. H. Ellis, Boston, Mass. 

(2) Contractor for pile wharf and dredging. — W. H. Ellis, Boston, Mass. 

(3) Contractor for riprap and ballast on shore. — W. H. Ellis, Boston, Mass. 

Section 44 includes the screen-house and sand-catcher on Nut 
Island, and a length of 11 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 6 inches sewer 
connecting the latter with the tunnel section through Quincy Great 
Hill. It has a total length of 1,539 feet. The first contract, dated 
April 7, 1902, embraces the levelling of Nut Island and the con- 
struction to sub-p:rade of an embankment on the bar connecting the 
island with Hough's Neck, using for the latter purpose material 
removed from the island. Boulder concrete is placed under a por- 
tion of the embankment as a foundation for the intended sewer. 

Work was begun April 17, 1902, upon the excavation for remov- 
ing the upper part of the island, and the entire contract was com- 
pleted October 16. The embankment is carried up to a height of 
about 21 feet above mean low water, with heavy ballast and riprap 
slopes finished 1 foot^ lower. The construction of the embankment 
to sub-grade required 34,000 cubic yards of filling and 38,000 tons 
of ballast and riprap. The upper part of the embankment, having 
a top elevation of about 27 feet above low water, with a top width 
of 25 feet, will be formed of the material excavated from the em- 
bankment when the outfall sewer is constructed within it, in the 
summer of next year. In the mean time, careful observations are 
being made of the settlement of the bar, due to the weight ot 
embankment imposed upon it. The maximum depth of this settle- 
ment, to date, is shown to be about 18 inches. The settlement is 
confined to a length of about 600 feet in the central section of the 
embankment. This length is now being super-weighted by deposit- 
ing upon it excavated material from the adjoining tunnel, Section 
45, so that a weight in excess of the ultimate load, due to the con- 



222 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

struction of the sewer and the completion of the embankment, may 
be placed upon it in advance of these operations. 

The second contract, dated April 7, 1902, included the construc- 
tion of a pile wharf, 550 feet in length, extending easterly from the 
eastern shore of Nut Island to a point about 500 feet beyond low 
water; the dredging of an area of about 4,000 square yards, at the 
end of the wharf, to a depth of 8% feet below low water ; the deposit 
of 700 tons of riprap as a protection for the shore end, and the build- 
ing of a masonry bulkhead. The wharf is in a very exposed location, 
liable to be swept by storms, with the possibility, also, of disturb- 
ance by ice in winter and early spring. It was therefore built in a 
very substantial manner, with heavy horizontal and diagonal bracing. 
The piles and braces are of oak, obtained partly from the wood lot 
on Section 48, acquired by the Commonwealth, and partly supplied 
by the contractor, who also furnished the hard pine and spruce lum- 
ber for the superstructure. 

The pile driving was begun on May 22, and the entire work was 
completed on October 15, 1902. 

The third contract, for the placing of riprap and rock ballast on 
the northerly and westerly slopes of Nut Island as a protection to 
the shore, was entered into on September 26, 1902. The work in- 
cluded about 11,000 tons of riprap and 3,000 tons of ballast, and 
was completed on November 12, 1902. 

Section 45, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frederick D. Smith. 
Contractor. — Latta & Terry Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

This is a tunnel section of 11 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 6 inches 
sewer, extending from near the northerly shore of Hough's Neck 
southeasterly along Island Avenue, under Great Hill, for a distance 
of about 972 feet. The contract was awarded October 14, 1902, 
and a start made with the work at the southerly end of the section 
on October 22 and at the northerly end on October 25. Instead of 
sinking a shaft, the excavation is carried on from inclines at either 
end, teams beino; used for the removal of the excavated material. 
The excavation is in compact hard-pan, in which explosives are used. 
Substantially no water is found in the headings. Since the com- 
mencement of the tunnel work, 450 feet of tunnel heading have 
been driven, at an average rate of 64 feet per week, with a maximum 
of 93 feet. To date, no masonry has been built in the headings. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 223 



Section 46, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frederick D. Smith. 
Contractor. — John Cashman, Quincy, Mass. 

The greater part of this section consists of an embankment cross- 
ing an angle of Quincy Bay, in which an 11 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 
6 inches sewer is to be constructed. The section extends from a 
point on Island Avenue, about 780 feet southeasterly from Sea 
Street, southwesterly through private lands and across tidal flats to 
Prospect Avenue, a total distance of about 791 feet. The contract 
for the construction of the 600 feet of embankment to sub-grade was 
awarded April 3, 1902. Work was begun April 23 and finished 
September 30. 

The design is similar to that described under Section 44, but with 
ballast and riprap on the seaward slope only. The sub-grade to 
which the embankment is carried is about 18 feet above mean low 
water ; the finished elevation, to be attained when the sewer is built, 
will be about 9 feet higher. Three lines of 12-inch cast-iron pipes, 
controlled by valves, are laid through the embankment to connect 
the Fensmere Hotel pond with the Bay. In the length between 
stations 3 -{-45 and 4-J-97, near the middle of the embankment, 
where considerable settlement was anticipated, a pile foundation, 
with a boulder concrete platform above it, was constructed up to 
the sub-foundation for the sewer. The construction of the embank- 
ment to sub-grade involved 10,000 cubic yards of filling, the material 
for which was taken from a lot near Prospect Avenue, acquired by 
the Commonwealth. About 7,000 tons of ballast and riprap were 
used on the slope of the embankment. The construction of the 
sewer in this embankment will be commenced next spring and com- 
pleted during the summer months. 

Section 47, Quincy, 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Francis L. Sellew. 
Contractor. — Charles G. Belden & Co., Quincy, Mass. 

The leading features of this section of 11 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 
6 inches sewer, 3,162 feet in length, were given in the last report. 
It extends from Prospect Avenue, through private land, Ratchford 
and Sea streets, to Darrow Street. The work was begun on October 
31, 1901, and 300 feet of it had been completed prior to December 
31, 1901. The excavation was generally in dry sand and gravel, 



224 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

with a small amount of water between stations 0+00 and 22+50. 
From Station 28+00 to the upper end of the section, the sewer arch 
is depressed, by reversing the horizontal and vertical diameters, on 
account of the proximity of the street surface. The entire section 
was completed on November 19, 1902, showing an average rate of 
progress of 60 feet per week from the commencement, with a maxi- 
mum of 145 feet. 

Culverts and Embankments, Sections 48-49, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Francis L. Sellew. 
Contractor. — Charles G. Belden & Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 

The last report fully described the nature of the work on embank- 
ments within which a large part of the sewer forming these two 
sections is to be constructed. They extend in a westerly direction, 
generally parallel to Sea Street, from the intersection of Sea and 
Darrow streets, through private and marsh lands to a point on the 
upland about 35 feet southeasterly from Sea Street, near the Adams 
homestead, a total distance of 9,375 feet. The total length of em- 
bankments is about 8,200 feet, of which about 7,080 feet fall within 
the present contract. This work, now completed, has involved a 
total of 166,000 cubic yards of filling to sub-grade of embankments. 
This is about 12 feet above the level of the marsh and 7 feet below 
the proposed finished grade. 

At the date of the last report about one-third of the contract 
volume of filling had been deposited. This had resulted in a maxi- 
mum vertical settlement of the embankments into the marsh slightly 
exceeding 4 feet, equivalent to a displacement of about 30 per cent, 
of the cross-sectional area of mud underlying their actual location, 
100 feet in width. The observations have been maintained during 
the year, and indicate a maximum vertical settlement of about 9 
feet, equivalent to a mud displacement of about 40 per cent., and a 
minimum settlement of about 2 feet, showing a mud displacement 
of about 18 per cent. The settlement has now practically ceased. 

The whole of the embankment filling and the balance of work on 
the six masonry culverts under the embankments have been com- 
pleted during the year. The contract having been completed on 
December 6, the average rate of filling has been 364 cubic yards, 
with a maximum of 800 cubic yards, per day. 

The slopes are protected by riprap and ballast, 3 feet in thickness, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOAKD. 225 

carried up to an elevation of 18 feet above mean low water, wherever 
exposed to wash of tide or floods. This protection extends, on the 
north side from Station 26+08 to Station 56+20, and on the south 
side from Station 5+70 to Station 58+90, making a total length of 
8,332 feet of protected slopes. A total of about 10,500 cubic yards 
of riprap and 4,400 cubic yards of ballast has been used in this work. 

Section 48 {Masonry Sewer in Embankment) , Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Francis L. Sellew. 
Contractor. — Charles G. Belden & Co., Quincy, Mass. 

This contract embraces the construction of a brick and concrete 
sewer, 11 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 6 inches in diameter, in that por- 
tion of the embankments before described, forming Section 48 of 
the High-level Sewer, extending from the intersection of Sea and 
Darrow streets to a point in private land about 210 feet easterly from. 
Palmer Street, a total distance of about 5,880 feet. The contract 
was awarded on December 19, 1902. Preparations are now being 
made for carrying out the work during the winter. 

For about 1,700 feet of the total length the sewer will be built 
upon a pile foundation. To prevent decay of the piles, they will be 
cut off at an elevation of 7 feet above mean low water. A continuous 
pier of boulder concrete will be carried up from the piles to the 
under side of the sewer structure. The material excavated from the 
trench, within the embankment, will be used to complete the em- 
bankment to the finished elevation of about 19 feet above marsh 
level. It is anticipated that the entire section will be completed 
before the winter of 1903. 

Section 49, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Francis L. Sellew. 

Contractor (for two contracts). — Charles G. Belden & Co., Syracuse, N. Y., and Quincy, 

Mass. 

This section extends from a point in the upland, adjacent to 
Quincy marsh, southeast of Palmer Street, westerly across Palmer 
Street and through the marsh, in a course generally parallel to Sea 
Street, to a point in the upland about 35 feet southeasterly from 
Sea Street, near the Adams homestead, a distance of 3,494 feet. 
The construction of embankments on 1,200 feet of this length was 
included in the contract for embankments, sections 48 and 49, as 
already described. 



226 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The work of sewer construction was divided into two further con- 
tracts, under the earlier of which, dated May 23, 1901, 1,997 feet 
of sewer were built in trench between that date and February 19, 
1902. This comprised three separate lengths of sewer in dry sand 
and gravel, at an average depth of 15 feet beloAv the original surface. 
About 100 feet of this sewer were built during the year under re- 
view. The surplus material from the trenches was used in the 
formation of embankments over or adjacent to the sewer. The 
filling of the embankments and the construction of three culverts 
were completed previous to December 31, 1901, as described in the 
last report. For a length of 104 feet in embankment, between 
stations 5+13 and 6+17, tie-rods were built into the sewer arch, 
and the arch was re-inforced with concrete. 

A trench machine was used for the excavation, except for a length 
of 150 feet at the end of the section, where a derrick was set up. 
An average of 40 feet of trench per week was excavated, with a maxi- 
mum of 144 feet. The sewer elevation being above the elevation 
of ordinary high tides, no water was pumped from the trenches. 

The second contract for sewer construction, dated June 18, 1902, 
was awarded to the same contractor. It includes 1,497 feet of 
sewer, in two lengths, built in embankments carried up from marsh 
level to sub-grade under previous contracts, together with the filling 
of the upper portions of these embankments with material excavated 
from the sewer trenches within the embankments. About 700 feet 
of the total length w T ill be built on a pile foundation. As stated 
under Sections 48-49, culverts and embankments, continuous obser- 
vations were taken to record the settlement of the embankments 
into the marsh, and the work of sewer construction was not un- 
dertaken until the stability of the embankments was practically 
assured. 

About 650 linear feet of sewer have been completed under the 
second contract. As the work is in embankment, any spreading 
that might result from slight movements of the embankments is 
resisted by tie-rods built into the sewer arch, which is also re- 
inforced with concrete. 

Section 50, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Francis L. Sellew. 
Contractor. — Charles G. Belden & Co., Quincy, Mass. 

This section consists of 3,071 feet of 11 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 
6 inches sewer, extending from a point in the upland, about 35 feet 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 227 

southeasterly from Sea Street, near the Adams homestead, westerly 
through Sea Street and private lands to Greenleaf Street. It is 
nearly all in open cut, averaging 18 feet in depth, in dry sand and 
gravel. A short length, crossing the end of a pond, near Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, is in embankment and built upon a boulder 
concrete foundation. For a length of 220 feet in Sea Street, a 
depressed cross-section is used, owing to the shallowness of the 
trench at that point. 

Work was begun on October 28, 1901, and completed on October 
22, 1902. This gives an average rate of progress of 60 feet per 
week, with a maximum of 130 feet. 

Section 51, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 
Contractor. — Thomas F. Moore, Syracuse, N. Y. 

This is an 11 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 6 inches sewer, in Greenleaf 
Street, extending from near the Mount Wollaston Cemetery to 
Hancock Street, a distance of 2,365 feet. At the date of the last 
report, 1,920 feet of sewer had been completed. The excavation, 
exceeding 20 feet in average depth, was in coarse sand and gravel, 
practically free from water, except for about 200 feet at the upper 
end, where a pulsometer pump was used. The average rate of 
progress for the whole section was 50 feet per week, with a maxi- 
mum of 102 feet. Special features of the work were described in 
the last report. The entire section was completed March 27, 1902. 

Section 52, Quincy, 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 

Contractor. — National Contracting Company, New York, N. Y. 

The length of 2,774 feet of 11 feet by 12 feet 3 inches sewer 
forming this section begins at the westerly end of Greenleaf Street, 
at Hancock Street, crosses Hancock and Adams streets, private 
lands, and New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad (Plymouth 
Division) to Upland Road, and passes thence along Upland Road 
and Adams Street to beyond Oakland Avenue. 

At the date of the last report, 280 feet of trench had been exca- 
vated. The excavation was in coarse sand and gravel for the first 
300 feet. This was succeeded by clay, sand and gravel, overlying 
an average depth of 12 feet of rock, extending to within 100 feet 
of Adams Street, at its junction with Upland Road. For the next 



228 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

600 feet the excavation was wholly in sand and gravel. Rock was 
found in the remainder of the section, averaging 12 feet in depth, 
with sand and gravel above. The work was all in open cut, with 
the exception of 220 feet of earth tunnel under the railroad location. 
A cable excavator was used in the open cut, except between Han- 
cock and Adams streets, where derricks were set up. 

Very little water was found. A 6-inch pump was located at the 
corner of Adams Street and Upland Road, and a 4-inch pump near 
the railroad location, but the volume pumped at no time exceeded 
300,000 gallons per day. 

Between Adams Street and the westerly line of the railroad loca- 
tion, the arch is re-inforced with concrete. The entire section was 
completed on November 29, 1902. An average rate of progress of 
50 feet per week, with a maximum of 120 feet, has been attained. 
One 10-inch and five 8-inch branches have been inserted, in the 
sewer for the drainage of local areas. 

James Mooney and John Murphy, rock men on this section, were 
killed on January 24 by the explosion of a dynamite cartridge 
while engaged in removing the unexploded portion of a blasting 
charge. 

On March 27, Dominic Risch, a laborer, was struck by a part of 
the moving hoisting machinery while crossing a trench on a brace. 
He fell to the bottom and was killed. 

Section 53, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 

Contractor. — National Contracting Company, New York, N. Y. 

This is an 11 feet by 12 feet 3 inches sewer in private lands and 
along the location of the Furnace Brook Metropolitan Parkway, ex- 
tending westerly from Adams Street, southwest of Oakland Avenue, 
for a distance of 1,900 feet. 

The work is all in trench, of which about 200 feet had been ex 
cavated at the date of the last report, in which reference was made 
to special features of construction. For the first 500 feet the ex 
cavation was in sand and gravel. This was followed by about 700 
feet in rock, averaging 10 feet in depth, with clay, sand and gravel 
above. The remainder of the section, with the exception of a length 
of 200 feet in which rock again appeared, was in clay, sand and 
gravel. Cable and trench machines were used. The maximum flow 
of water in the trench was about 400,000 gallons per day. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 229 

For a length of 122 feet, where the sewer closely adjoins Furnace 
Brook, tie-rods were built into the arch and the arch was re-inforced 
with concrete. 

The work was completed on December 6, 1902, showing an aver- 
age rate of progress over the entire section of 31 feet per week, 
with a maximum of 83 feet. 

A 10-inch and a 12-ineh branch were inserted in the sewer for 
the convenience of local areas. 

Section 54, Quincy. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 

Contractor. — National Contracting Company, New York, N. Y. 

Commencing in the location of the Furnace Brook Metropolitan 
Parkway, at a point about 1,600 feet northeasterly from its junction 
with Adams Street, this section, of 11 feet by 12 feet 3 inches 
sewer 1,992 feet in length, extends in a westerly direction through 
the Parkway location and Adams Street to a point in Adams Street 
near Eaton's ice pond. 

The excavation was wholly in trench, of which 100 feet had been 
completed at the date of the last report. The excavation was in 
clay, sand and gravel, with a depth of 7 feet of rock in the bottom 
of the first 1,000 feet and 12 feet of blue clay overlaid by sand and 
gravel in the upper 990 feet. The average depth of trench was 
about 18 feet. 

Trench machines were used for handling the excavated material. 
The volume of water found averaged about 500,000 gallons per day, 
increasing to 1,200,000 gallons when the adjoining marsh areas were 
flooded. Six-inch centrifugal and 4-inch piston pumps were used. 

For a length of about 95 feet, where the sewer passes under Fur- 
nace Brook, the arch was re-inforced with Portland concrete. An 
18-inch and a 10-inch branch were built into the sewer toward the 
upper end of the section. The entire section was completed on 
September 27, 1902. The average rate of progress was 45 feet per 
week, with a maximum of 123 feet. 

Section 55, Quincy and Jlilton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 
Contractor. — H. P. Nawn, Boston, Mass. 

This is an 11 feet by 12 feet sewer, extending in a westerly direc- 
tion along Adams Street, from a point near Eaton's ice pond, in 



230 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Quincy, to a point near Church Street, in Milton, a total distance 
of 3,556 feet, of which 2,627 feet are in tunnel, including 390 feet 
in rock. The average depth of tunnel below the street surface was 
45 feet. 

The last report gave details of the methods adopted by the con- 
tractor from the commencement of the work on December 1, 1900, 
to December 31, 1901, with special reference to its division into 
tunnel and open cut, the character of the excavation and the large 
volume of water met with. At the latter date, 373 feet had been 
excavated in trench and 1,346 feet in tunnel, — a total of 1,719 feet ; 
and the masonry sewer structure had been completed in 1,110 feet 
of this length. 

A cable way was used for trench excavation. On the tunnel work 
an elevator was erected at shaft Xo. 1, about 850 feet from the lower 
end of the section ; derricks were used at the other two shafts. 
Throughout the open trench work, the sewer arch was re-inforced 
with Portland concrete, which was also used for backfilling over the 
arch in 929 feet of tunnel. Sheeting and bracing were left in place 
throughout the open cut. Where dry packing was used over the 
arch in tunnel, concrete collars were introduced at frequent intervals, 
to prevent any movement of ground- water along the arch. The 
pumpage at the shafts averaged about 1,000,000 gallons per day, 
and attained a maximum of 1,500,000 gallons, rendering necessary 
the use of 6-inch piston pumps in shafts Nos. 1 and 3 and in the open 
cut near the end of the section, as well as a 10-inch pump, occasion- 
ally assisted by a 6-inch, in shaft Xo. 2. 

A 100 horse-power boiler near the corner of Adams and Wash- 
ington streets supplied steam for an air compressor and pumps at 
shaft Xo. 2, a dvnaino for the electric li°:htin£ of tunnel, and, at 
times, for a stone crusher. 

A 12-inch branch was inserted at Station 26+33. The section was 
completed on Xovember 29, 1902, showing an average rate of prog- 
ress, over the entire section, of 35 feet per week, rising to 88 feet. 

Timothy Fitzgerald, a night worker on the tunnel headings, 
attempted to come to the surface, on the morning of February 6, 
by holding on to the bottom of the elevator after it had started. 
He was swept oft* when the elevator reached the surface platform, 
fell back into the shaft and was killed. 



JSV. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 231 



Section 56, Milton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 

Contractor. — National Contracting Company, New York, N. Y. 

This sewer, 10 feet 7 inches by 11 feet 7 inches in diameter, is 
located in Adams Street, extending northwesterly from near Church 
Street to a point about 800 feet beyond East Milton station, a 
distance of 1,500 feet. Of this length, 1,460 feet had been exca- 
vated at the date of the last report, and the masonry structure was 
completed for a length of 1,345 feet. The entire section was com- 
pleted February 8, 1902. 

The work was in open trench at an average depth of 31 feet, 
with rock in bottom for almost the entire length, overlaid by gravel, 
sand and blue clay. The average depth of rock, from its surface to 
the bottom of the trench, was about 12% feet, with a maximum of 
23 feet. The volume of water met with was easily handled by a 
4-inch piston pump and a 3-inch pulsometer. The excavated ma- 
terial was transported by a cable machine, except at the crossing of 
the Granite branch of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Eailroad, where a derrick was used. The average rate of progress 
over the entire section was about 25 feet per week, with a maximum 
of 62 feet. 

Section 57, Milton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 
Contractor. — J. W. Bustin & Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 

This section, consisting of 1,869 feet of 10 feet 7 inches by 11 
feet 7 inches sewer, occupies the centre of the proposed Milton 
boulevard from Adams Street to Pleasant Street. The work is in 
open cut, at an average depth of 22 feet. Portions of the line, 
aj^recrating 700 feet in length, are in a low embankment, formed 
by depositing surplus material from the sewer trench. 

Work was begun October 31, 1901, and 300 feet of trench had 
been excavated at the date of the last report. In the first 350 feet, 
the excavation was in a very hard mixture of clay, gravel and sand ; 
the succeeding 1,200 feet were in sand and gravel, with some clay 
and disintegrated slate ledge ; the remainder of the excavation was 
in sand and gravel. A trench machine was used throughout. 

The ordinary flow of water in the trench was from 15,000 to 
18,000 gallons per day, but this increased, near Pleasant Street, to 



232 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

500,000, with a maximum of 650,000 gallons. A 6-inch submerged 
centrifugal pump was used near this point and a 4-inch pump near 
Reservation Road. Eight 8-inch branches were built into the sewer 
for the drainage of local areas. The section was completed on 
October 4, 1902. The average rate of progress was 45 feet per 
week, with a maximum of 90 feet. 

Section 58, Milton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 
Contractor. — Latta & Terry Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

This section of 10 feet 7 inches by 11 feet 7 inches sewer occupies 
the centre of the proposed Milton boulevard between Pleasant and 
Centre streets, a distance of 2,560 feet, in open cut, averaging 17 
feet in depth. For a length of nearly 2,000 feet, the sewer is cov- 
ered by an embankment formed of surplus earth from the trench. 

At the date of the last report, trench had been partially excavated 
west of Pleasant Street for a distance of 600 feet. In the first 1,500 
feet, the excavation was in sand and gravel and clay ; the remainder 
of the section was in clay and gravel. An average thickness of 3 
feet of peat formed the surface covering from Station 13+00 to the 
end of the section. A trench machine was used for the excavations. 

The volume of water varied from 500,000 to 750,000 gallons per 
day, and was handled by a 6-inch centrifugal pump and a pulsometer. 

The sewer arch is depressed at Unkety Brook, which is carried 
over the sewer by twin culverts, each 4 feet wide and 3 feet high. 
The branches inserted in the sewer for the drainage of local areas 
include one 18-inch, one 12-inch and eight 8-inch. The section was 
completed on December 11, 1902. Excluding the period from De- 
cember 12, 1901, to March 27, 1902, during which all work on this 
section was suspended, the average rate of progress was 63 feet per 
week, with a maximum of 102 feet. 

Section 59, Milton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 
Contractor. — H. P. Nawn, Boston, Mass. 

This 10 feet 7 inches by 11 feet 7 inches sewer is located in the 
centre of the proposed Milton boulevard, and extends from Centre 
Street to Randolph Avenue, a distance of 2,568 feet. The entire 
section is in a low embankment, formed of surplus excavated mate- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 233 

rial, finished at boulevard sub-grade. The average depth of excava- 
tion below the original surface is 20 feet. 

About 200 feet of trench had been excavated to grade prior to 
December 31, 1901. The excavation for the first 2,400 feet was in 
clay and gravel, with pockets of sand and gravel ; the remainder of 
the section was in sand and gravel. Between stations 20+00 and 
24+00 the material in the bottom 10 feet was so compacted as to 
require drilling and blasting for its removal. A cable way w T as used 
for excavation. A 6-inch piston and a 6-inch centrifugal pump 
handled the w T ater in the trench, averaging about 250,000 gallons 
per day, rising to a maximum of 400,000 gallons. Eight 8-inch 
branches were built in the sewer for the drainage of local areas. 

The section was completed on December 20. The average rate 
of progress was 42 feet per week, with a maximum of 90 feet. 

Section 60, Milton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 
Contractor. — J. "W. Bustin & Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Still following the centre line of the proposed Milton boulevard 
location, this section of 10 feet 7 inches by 11 feet 7 inches sewer 
extends from Randolph Avenue to near the junction of Canton 
Avenue and Brook Road, a distance of 1,609 feet, in open cut, with 
an average depth of 19 feet. For about 1,000 feet of the above 
length, the sewer is in embankment, of a maximum height of 9 feet 
above the original surface, and formed of surplus material from the 
sewer trench. 

Work on this section was begun on May 12, 1902. The excava- 
tion was in sand and gravel, with a surface layer of loam or peat, 
about l%feet in thickness. Between stations 5+00 and 7+00 peat 
excavation was found within 4 feet of the bottom of the trench. A 
trench machine was used for excavation. A 6-inch submerged cen- 
trifugal pump raised the water found in the trench, averaging 450,- 
000 gallons, with a maximum of 600,000 gallons, per day. 

Between stations 5+18 and 6+95, the sewer arch is re-info reed 
with concrete through the area of deep peat excavation. Six 8-inch 
branches are provided for drainage of local areas. 

The section was completed on November 29, 1902, showing an 
average rate of progress of 50 feet per week, rising to 108 feet. 



234 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Section 61, Milton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 
Contractor. — Charles G. Belden & Co., Quincy, Mass. 

This is a 10 feet 7 inches by 11 feet 7 inches sewer, commencing 
near the junction of Canton Avenue with Brook Road, and extend- 
ing westerly along Brook Road and its widened location to a point 
about 20 feet northwesterly from Pine Tree Brook, a distance of 
2,829 feet. 

The section is in open cut, at an average depth of 25 feet. Work 
was begun on June 5, 1902. A length of 2,510 feet has been ex- 
cavated to date, and 2,345 feet of masonry sewer have been built, 
equivalent to an average rate of progress of 83 feet per w T eek. The 
first 700 feet of excavation were in sand and gravel. Clay, gravel 
and sand were found in the succeeding 700 feet, and from Station 
17+00 to the end of the section. A length of about 316 feet remains 
to be excavated. Trench machines have been used. The volume 
of water in the trenches has averaged 600,000 gallons per day, with 
a maximum of 2,500,000 gallons. A 10-inch and a 6-inch centrif- 
ugal pump and two 4-inch pulsometers have been used. 

Section 62, Mil tori. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 
Contractor. — E. W. Everson & Co., Providence, R. I. 

This section of 10 feet 7 inches by 11 feet 7 inches sewer com- 
mences near Pine Tree Brook and extends northwesterly along 
Brook Road to a point 530 feet beyond Ridge Road, a distance of 
2,178 feet, of w T hich 397 feet, near Ridge Road, are in rock tunnel. 
The average depth of the 1,781 feet in open cut is 27 feet. The 
open cut is in sand and gravel, with clay. Rock was found in the 
bottom of the trench for two-thirds of the section. 

At the date of the last report the whole of the excavation in trench 
and tunnel had been completed, and only 200 feet of masonry sewer 
remained to be constructed. This was completed on March 22 , 
1902, showing an average rate of progress over the entire section 
of 35 feet per week, with a maximum of 1 13 feet. 

A trench machine was used on the open cut and two air com- 
pressors and a dynamo at the tunnel. A 6-inch centrifugal pump, 
a 4-inch piston pump and four pulsometers were used to drain the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 235 

trenches and tunnel. The pumpage averaged 500,000 gallons per 
day, with a maximum of 750,000 gallons. 

Four 8-inch branches, for local areas, were built into the sewer. 

Section 63, Milton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 

Contractor. — National Contracting Company, New York, N. Y. 

The 2,262 feet of 10 feet 7 inches by 11 feet 7 inches sewer, 
forming this section, extend in open cut, averaging 25 feet in depth, 
from a point in Brook Road, 800 feet easterly from the Metropolitan 
Blue Hills Parkway, along Brook Road and across the Parkway and 
Brush Hill Road to a point in Park lands southeast of Neponset 
River. 

Previous to December 31, 1901,' 1,882 feet of trench had been 
excavated and the masonry built for a length of 1,662 feet, as 
referred to in the last report, which also gave details of excavation. 
The average volume of water pumped from the commencement of 
the work to the end of September, 1901, amounted to 300,000 gal- 
lons per day ; but this increased, in the period between the latter 
date and March, 1902, to 2,000,000 gallons, with a maximum of 
3,300,000 gallons, per day. To handle these large amounts of 
ground-water it was necessary to install 10-inch, 6-inch and 4-inch 
centrifugal pumps, 6-inch and 4-inch piston pumps and a pulsom- 
eter. A cableway and a trench machine were used for the exca- 
vation. Two steam drills were used for rock found in the bottom 
of the trench for the first 600 feet. The work was completed on 
April 5, 1902. The average rate of progress on the entire section 
was 32 feet per week, with a maximum of 68 feet. 

An 18-inch, a 10-inch and three 8-inch branches have been built 
into the sewer to provide for the drainage of local areas. 

On March 31, Wesley Barker, carpenter, was killed by falling 
off a brace across the trench, while engaged, with other workmen, 
in raising a wooden arch centre. 

Section 64, Milton and Hyde Park {Day Work) . 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

This section includes three parallel lines of 60-inch cast-iron pipe, 
each 154 feet in length, under the Neponset River, with about 95 
feet of 10 feet 7 inches by 11 feet 7 inches sewer, and two masonry 



236 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

head-houses, the whole forming a connection, 272 feet in length, 
between sections 63 and 65. 

The pipes are laid without depression under the bed of the river. 
The work was carried out by day labor, under the direct control of 
the engineer. 

The river crossing was constructed within a coffer-dam, and opera- 
tions were so arranged that little more than one-third of the water- 
way of the river was occupied at one time. Pile driving for the 
first section of the coffer-dam was begun on April 21, 1902. The 
excavation, at an average depth of 8 feet below bed of river, was in 
sand and gravel. An 8-inch centrifugal pump was used on the Hyde 
Park and a 6-inch on the Milton shore. The work was completed 
late in December. 

Section 65, Hyde Park. 

This section was completed prior to December 31, 1901, as re- 
ferred to in the last report. 

Section 66, Hyde Park. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — C. Barton Pratt. 
Contractor. — Ed. W. &. J. J. Everson, Providence, R. I. 

This section of 9 feet 3 inches by 10 feet 2 inches sewer, 5,300 
feet in length, practically all in tunnel, has been described in earlier 
reports. It pierces the divide between the Stony Brook and Ne- 
ponset River basins. The excavation is in rock, generally hard 
felsite. 

During the year under review, the masonry lining of the tunnel 
has been begun and practically completed over the entire length of 
5,015 feet, and the masonry has been built in the 285 feet length of 
open cut. 

A Portland concrete arch was adopted in the tunnel, in place of 
the usual brick arch, except for a length of 79 feet under the location 
of the Midland Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. The concrete arch and sidewall backing were first put in 
place followed by a concrete invert, 10 inches in thickness. The 
invert and sides were then lined with 4 inches of Portland brick- 
work. These operations involved an average of 2.5 cubic yards of 
concrete and 0.203 cubic yards of brickwork per linear foot, with 
an average rate of progress, on the concrete, of 120 linear feet per 
week and 293 linear feet on the brickwork. 





HIGH-LEVEL SEWER — Rock Tunnel in Hyde Park — Steel Ribs and Concrete Lining. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 237 

The contractor's plant included a single cage elevator for lowering 
materials into a central shaft 65 feet deep. A gravity mixer was 
used for the concrete, delivering into cars with a capacity of about 
2% cubic yards, and hauled through the tunnel by a small loco- 
motive. Flanged sheet-iron plates, 5% feet long and 16 inches 
wide, supported by 3-inch I-beam ribs carried down to the foot- 
ings of the side-walls, were used for the concrete arch. A coat of 
thin oil applied to the lagging ensured a smooth-finished surface on 
the removal of the centres. 

The tunnel was kept dry by a 6-inch underdrain leading to the 
shaft, where the water was lifted to the surface by a 4-iuch pump. 
The volume of water handled was about 150,000 gallons per day. 

The section is practically completed ; the only work remaining 
to be done at the date of this report is the building of a manhole in 
the central shaft, 65 feet in depth. 

Section 6 7, Hyde Park {Day Wo7*k) . 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

This section connects the adjacent sections, 6Q and 68, by two 
parallel lines of 60-inch cast-iron pipe, each about 86 feet in length, 
laid in concrete below the bed of Stony Brook, terminating at either 
end in head-houses connected with an a^re^ate length of 217 feet 
of 9 feet 3 inches by 10 feet 2 inches sewer, the latter having an 
average depth of about 18 feet. The pipes are not depressed. The 
total length of the section is about 328 feet. The whole of the 
work has been done by day labor, under the direct supervision of 
the engineer. 

At the date of the last report, about 40 feet of pipe had been laid 
in each line, and the head-houses were under construction. The 
excavation was in sand and gravel, with many boulders. Rock was 
also found for a length of 75 feet at the easterly end. A 4-inch 
pulsometer pump was sufficient to handle the water until about 
March 1, 1902, when, owing to the flooding of the trench by 
freshets, a 6-inch centrifugal pump was used. The flow of Stony 
Brook was carried in a sluice-way, 12 feet wide, 4 feet deep and 
about 30 feet long, over the sewer trench. An incline was used to 
raise the excavated material from the sewer trenches. The work 
was completed on April 23, 1902. 



238 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Section 68, Hyde Park and West Roxbury; Section 69, West 

Roxbury. 
These sections were completed prior to December 31, 1901. 

Section 70, West Roxbury. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — C. Barton Pratt. 
Contractor. — Charles Linehan, Cambridge, Mass. 

This section of 8 feet 9 inches by 9 feet 8 inches sewer commences 
in Hyde Park Avenue, and extends thence through Larch Place, 
under the main line of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road, through the extension of Harrison Street, along private lands 
adjoining the railroad and Stony Brook, under Washington Street 
and in private lands to South Street, at Bussey arch, and along 
South Street to Bussey Street, a total distance of 3,748 feet. The 
actual length of sewer included in the contract is 278 feet less. 
With the exception of about 250 feet, the work was completed prior 
to December 31, 1901, and was fully described in the last report. 
The remaining length was completed on July 10, 1902. 

Section 71, West Roxbury. 
This section was completed prior to December 31, 1901. 

Section 72, West Roxbury. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — C. Barton Pratt. 
Contractor. — Jones & Meehan, Boston, Mass. 

This is an 8 feet 9 inches by 9 feet 8 inches sewer, commen6ing 
in South Street at the upper end of Section 71, and extending thence 
along South Street (crossing the Arborway) to the easterly side of 
St. Joseph Street, a total distance of 3,010 feet. Of this length, 
1,140 feet were in earth tunnel, at an average depth of about 38 feet. 

At the date of the last report, the whole of the open cut and all 
but 40 feet of the tunnel had been excavated. The masonry had 
been built in the entire length of open cut and in all but 100 feet 
of the tunnel. The structural features of the work were described 
in the last report. Near the end of Section 71 a small amount of 
water was found in the excavation, although the underdrain of that 
section had been carefully plugged in the usual way on its com- 
pletion. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 239 

The entire section was completed on February 6, 1902, showing 
an average rate of progress of 44 feet per week. 

Section 73, West Roxbury. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — C. Barton Pratt. 
Contractor. — National Contracting Company, New York, N. Y. 
Contractor for Portion of Work. — Harry P. Nawn, Boston, Mass. 
Superintendent of Construction by Day Labor. — Charles A. Haskin. 

This 9-foot circular sewer, in South and Centre streets, extends 
from near St. Joseph Street to near Boylston Street. The entire 
length was designed to be in tunnel, at an average depth of about 
50 feet ; and, as the use of compressed air and shields was regarded 
as probable in the whole or portions of the work, the usual horseshoe 
type of sewer was abandoned in favor of a circular cross-section. 
Of the total length of 4,775 feet, it was anticipated that about 1,400 
feet of the tunnel headings would be in Roxbury pudding stone, 
and the remainder in sand. 

At the date of the last report, two shafts had been sunk to grade, 
one near Lakeville Place, in rock ; the other at Pond Street, in 
sand. From the former, 1,300 feet of rock heading had been par- 
tially excavated, located about equally north and south of the shaft, 
and about 100 feet of concrete invert had been built in that length. At 
the Pond Street shaft a metallic shield and air compressors had been 
installed July 1, 1901, and a start made by the National Contracting 
Company to drive a southerly heading by the pneumatic process. 
As stated in the last report, no substantial progress had been made 
with this portion of the section on December 31, 1901, and this 
condition was maintained until the following February, when the 
Board took possession of the entire work, and have since carried on 
by day labor that portion of it extending for a length of 2,800 feet 
south of the Pond Street shaft. A contract for the completion of 
the remaining 1,975 feet was awarded to H. P. Nawn, of Boston, on 
April 21, 1902; and the work of lining the 1,300 feet of rock 
tunnel is now in progress, leaving about 675 feet of sand tunnel to 
be driven and lined with masonry under this contract. 

The day-work portion, under the supervision of Mr. Charles A. 
Haskin, was commenced at the Pond Street shaft on March 26, 1902, 
and 600 feet of tunnel and masonry lining have been completed to 
date. The method used is the pneumatic process originally contem- 
plated, a pressure of from 15 to 17 pounds per square inch in excess 



240 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

of the atmospheric pressure being maintained in the headings. This 
is found sufficient to keep the headings dry, although the ground- 
water stands at an elevation of about 32 feet above the sewer invert. 
The excavation is in sand, with some gravel. The sand is very fine 
in places. The roof of the headings is supported by flanged steel 
plates, 3% feet long by 1 foot wide, held by metallic sewer braces 
acting against a longitudinal needle-beam in the axis of the heading. 
The plate lining is carried down so as to occupy about two-thirds of 
the entire periphery of the headings. The cross-section of the 
sewer structure consists of a lining of Portland brickwork, approxi- 
mately 12 inches thick, built directly against the interior face of the 
plates. 

The plant at this shaft consists of two vertical boilers, which fur- 
nish power for the hoister and two air compressors. 

A second day-work shaft, at Monument Square, was begun on 
April 18, 1902, and headings are now being driven in both direc- 
tions from it. The shaft is 43 feet deep. The upper 20 feet con- 
sists of five sections of steel cylinder, 6 feet in diameter, resting 
upon a timber deck 20 inches thick. The remaining 23 feet of shaft 
below the deck, together with about 75 feet of the tunnel in very 
fine sand, were driven in each heading by the use of compressed air 
and a horizontal air lock at the surface, connected with the vertical 
cylinder. Air locks were installed in the completed sewer after 
these 75-foot lengths had been driven and lined, and the tunnel was 
then driven as described in the case of the Pond Street shaft, no 
further use being made of the surface air lock. 

The progress to date, from this shaft, is 388 feet in a southerly 
and 345 feet in a northerly direction. The ground-water elevation 
in this part of the work is about 29 feet above the sewer invert. 

The plant consists of one vertical and two horizontal boilers, ag- 
gregating 300 horse-power, which supply steam for a hoister and 
for three air compressors, as well as for small feed-pumps. 

An aggregate of 70 feet per week is being regularly driven and 
lined on the day-work portion of the tunnel, a rate which will ensure 
its completion early in the coming summer. 



No. 57.] AND SEWEKAGE BOARD. 241 



Section 74, West Roxbury and Roxbury. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — C. Barton Pratt. 
Contractor.— H. P. Nawn, Boston, Mass. 

This sewer, located in Centre and Day streets, extends from near 
Boylston Street, in West Roxbury, to near Heath Street, in Roxbury r 
a distance of 2,982 feet. A length of 190 feet between Hutchins 
Avenue and Minden Street is in open cut, in sand and gravel ; the 
remainder is wholly in rock tunnel, with an average depth of 54 
feet and a maximum of 65 feet. The lower portion, 1,000 feet in 
length, is 8 feet 3 inches by 9 feet 2 inches in diameter, changing 
to 6 feet 6 inches by 7 feet in a bell-mouth junction at Perkins 
Street. The sewer above that point forms a branch line to receive 
the sewage lifted at the Ward Street pumping station. The main 
line, above bell-mouth, is designed for the reception of high-level 
sewage of Roxbury, Brookline, Brighton, Newton and other areas, 
now flowing into low-level sewers of the Charles River Valley Sewer, 
and is not included in the present scheme of construction. 

At the date of the last report, the tunnel excavation was completed 
and the sewer had been constructed in the open cut and in 1,800 
feet of tunnel. The sewer construction in the remaining 992 feet 
of heading, including the bell-mouth, was completed May 3, 1902. 

The ordinary volume of water in the heading was about 70,000 
gallons per day, handled by two small steam pumps. A 100 horse- 
power boiler, installed at Perkins and Day streets, furnished steam 
for pumping, air compressors, electric lighting, etc. Excavation 
through the rock tunnel, over the whole length of the smaller sewer, 
progressed at an average rate of 31 feet per week, with a maximum 
of 60 feet. In the large heading it averaged 24 feet per week, rising 
to 40 feet. Dry packing was used over the completed arch, except 
where concrete was substituted to meet special conditions. 

A fatal accident occurred on this section within a month after its 
completion. Patrick McCarthy, an experienced employe, as inspec- 
tor and foreman, on Metropolitan Sewerage Works from their com- 
mencement, entered the deep manhole at Day and Perkins streets 
on the evening of May 26. At that time considerable groundwater 
had accumulated in the bulkheaded section. He was overcome by 
foul air while descending, fell to the bottom and was drowned. 



242 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Section 75, Roxbury. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — C. Barton Pratt. 

Contractor for Parts of Section. — E. W. Everson & Co., Providence, R. I. 

This tunnel section of 6 feet 6 inches by 7 feet sewer, passing 
under Parker Hill, at a maximum depth of 175 feet, was described 
in the last report. It is 3,070 feet in length, and extends from the 
junction of Day and Heath streets, largely under private lands, for 
a distance of 1,700 feet before entering Calumet Street. It con- 
tinues thence along St. Alphonsus Street to a point about midway 
between Tremont and Smith streets, where it is intended that the 
two 48-inch force-mains (Section 76) from the Ward Street pump- 
ing station shall deliver into the sewer. 

At the date of the last report, the contractor had completed the 
pumping out of the second shaft, on St. Alphonsus Street, near 
Alleghany Street, which had been abandoned by a former con- 
tractor, and about 50 feet of heading had been driven from this 
shaft. During the present year the remaining 2,167 feet of tunnel 
have been driven, for the most part in hard, conglomerate rock. 
A pocket of hard-pan, about 100 feet in length, occurred at the 
crossing of Tremont Street, with disintegrated conglomerate adjoin- 
ing it, at each end, for an aggregate length of 150 feet. In the 
same period the masonry sewer structure has been built in all but 
300 feet of this part of the section. It consists of a concrete invert, 
lined with 4 inches of Portland brickwork, and an 8-inch brick arch 
backfilled with dry packing. In building the sewer, the concrete 
side-walls and the brick arch are first put in place, followed by the 
concrete invert and the invert lining of 4-inch brickwork. 

The rock was drilled by the use of compressed air, supplied to 
drills set upon vertical columns. 

The contractor installed at the St. Alphonsus Street shaft a single 
cage elevator for moving material and workmen, and an 80 horse- 
power boiler for operating two compressors, pumps and stone 
crusher. The crushed stone was transported by a belt conveyor 
to a hopper, and distributed into bins for future use in concrete. 
Progress on the tunnel headings included in the later contract aver- 
aged 43 feet per week, with a maximum of 76 feet. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 243 

Section 76, Roxbury. 

This section embraces the two lines of 48-inch cast-iron force- 
main, traversing different routes and aggregating 3,006 feet in 
length, which will connect the Ward Street pumping station with 
the 6 feet 6 inches by 7 feet sewer on St. Alphonsus Street. A 
contract was entered into on December 26, 1902, with the Warren 
Foundry and Machine Company, for supplying the pipes required 
for this work. They are to be delivered during the winter and 
spring of 1903, in readiness for placing in the ground during the 
summer. 

Section 77, Roxbury. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Contractor for Pumping Plant. — The Allis-Chalmers Company of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Contractor for Pumping Station and Connections. — L. P. Soule & Son, Boston, Mass. 

This section includes the pumping station, located at the south- 
easterly angle of Ward and Vancouver streets, Roxbury, and con- 
nections with the suction sewer and force-mains. A contract for 
furnishing and erecting two 50,000,000-gallon, vertical, triple- 
expansion, 60-inch stroke pumping engines, with boilers and other 
appurtenances, was entered into with the Allis-Chalmers Company 
of Milwaukee, Wis., on January 17, 1902. Substantial progress 
has been made to date in preparation for the erection of the pumping 
plant in the latter part of 1903. On October 8, 1902, a contract 
was entered into for the pumping station foundations, superstructure 
and connections. The station will be built of hard brick, with 
granite trimmings. The foundations will be of Portland concrete. 
The roof will be of steel and slate. The engine room will be about 
120 feet long and 65 feet wide, the boiler room 105 feet long and 
38 feet wide. The coal-house will be an underground concrete 
structure, about 48 feet long and 35 feet wide, with a coal capacity 
of about 400 tons. A screening chamber, about 47 feet long and 
42 feet wide, adjoining the main buildings, is of the same type of 
construction as the main buildings and covers the passages in the 
suction sewer, in which movable screens will intercept rags and 
other floating matter which it is desirable to remove from the sewage 
before it reaches the pumps. The chimney will be 150 feet high 
and have a central flue 6 feet in diameter. 



244 METROPOLITAN WATEK [Pub. Doc. 

The excavation for the screen house and chimney foundations is 
completed, and some progress has been made in excavating for the 
foundations of the engine house and valve room ; about two-thirds 
of the concrete in the chimney foundation is in place. 

Section 78, Roxbury. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 
Contractor. — Patrick McGovern, Boston, Mass. 

This section, 6 feet 6 inches by 7 feet in diameter, known as the 
suction sewer, will connect the existing Charles River Valley Sewer 
of the Metropolitan System with the Ward Street pumping station. 
It will extend from the pumping station lot, in Vancouver Street, 
northeasterly along Vancouver Street to the Metropolitan sewer in 
Ruggles Street, near Huntington Avenue, a total distance of about 
680 feet. It will also include a smaller connection with the Metro- 
politan sewer for intercepting sewage to be conveyed by the reversal 
of the existing Gradient in the Huntington Avenue sewer of the 
Metropolitan System. The present contract includes only about 
650 feet of sewer. The actual connection with the Charles River 
Valley Sewer will not be made until the Ward Street pumping 
station and the High-level Sewer as a whole are in readiness for 
dealing with the diverted sewage. 

The sewer is being constructed in trench at an average depth of 

23 feet, with a pile foundation in the greater part of the length. 

Work was begun at the southerly end of the section on October 20 

and near Huntington Avenue on November 6. The excavation is 

in clay, overlaid by deep beds of peat. The crossing of Huntington 

Avenue is attended by unusual difficulties, from the complication of 

sewers, water mains, electrical conduits and lines of street railway 

tracks, all of which have to be maintained while the work of piling 

and building the sewer is in progress. At the date of this report 

about half of the section is completed. 

• 
Cement Testing. 

During the year, a total of about 109,000 barrels of Portland and 
18,000 barrels of Rosendale cement have been used. The cement 
was subjected to the usual tests to determine its fineness, tensile 
strength, specific gravity and freedom from checking, cracking and 
other imperfections. In the following table, the results under the 
first two heads are summarized for the two and a half years : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



245 






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METROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 247 



MAINTENANCE. 

Scope of Work and Force Employed. 

The maintenance of Metropolitan Sewerage Systems includes the 
operation of five pumping stations and 89 miles of Metropolitan 
sewers, receiving the discharge from 869.88 miles of town and city 
sewers at 258 points, together with the care and study of inverted 
siphons under streams. 

The present maintenance force of 80 men includes 47 engineers 
and other employes at the pumping stations, and 33 men employed 
on actual sewer maintenance and care of pumping station grounds. 
During the year the system of hiring teams was discontinued, and 
four single teams and equipment have been purchased by the Com- 
monwealth. In the three following tables the use of the completed 
systems and other data are shown : — 



248 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



251 



CAPACITY AND RESULTS. 

The following tables summarize the pumping records for the year 
for the North Metropolitan and'Quincy stations : — 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 
At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year : 49,800,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 51,500,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 3 firemen, 6 screenmen and 1 reliefman. 

Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3.79 to $5.50 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pnmpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1903. 

January, . 




1,957,200,000 


63,100,000 


47,000,000 


92,100,000 


11.61 


66,300,000 


February, 








1,686,700,000 


60,200,000 


46,500,000 


112,700,000 


12.10 


55,400,000 


March, 








2,558,000,000 


82,500,000 


66,700,000 


128,700,000 


12.54 


61,500,000 


April, . 








1,899,300,000 


63,300,000 


45,200,000 


114,700,000 


11.84 


57,400,000 


May, 








1,433,000,000 


46,200,000 


38,600,000 


62,500,000 


11.30 


47,800,000 


June, 








1,196,000,000 


39,900,000 


36,000,000 


48,600,000 


11.18 


43,300,000 


July, 








1,244,600,000 


40,100,000 


34,600,000 


64,200,000 


11.04 


47,800,000 


August, . 








1,212,800,000 


39,100,000 


31,600,000 


52,100,000 


11.09 


43,600,000 


September, 








1,194,700,000 


39,800,000 


34,300,000 


53,200,000 


11.08 


47,700,000 


October, . 








1,319,700,000 


42,600,000 


34,300,000 


70,700,000 


11.15 


43,500,000 


November, 








1,250,600,000 


41,700,000 


36,400,000 


59,200,000 


10.96 


44,400,000 


December, 








1,862,200,000 


60,100,000 


42,100,000 


100,800,000 


10.95 


49,100,000 


Total, 


18,814,800,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Averages, 








- 


51,500,000 


41,100,000 


80,000,000 


11.40 


49,800,000 



252 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



East Boston Pumping Station. 
At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year : 54,500,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day : 49,500,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 3 firemen, 6 screenmen and 1 reliefman. 

Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from §3.93 to §4.09 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(G-allons). 


Average 
per Day 
(G-allous). 


Minimum 

Day 
(G-allons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft. -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1902. 
January, .... 


1,896,500,000 


61,200,000 


45,000,000 


90,100,000 


15.72 


62,500,000 


February, 






1,610,000,000 


57,500,000 


41,600,000 


110,700,000 


15.50 


59,400,000 


March, 






2,496,000,000 


80,500,000 


64,700,000 


126,700,000 


16.25 


62,500,000 


April, 






1,841,200,000 


61,400,000 


43,200,000 


112,700,000 


15.40 


58,900,000 


May, 






1,370,700,000 


44,200,000 


36,600,000 


60,500,000 


14.84 


56,400,000 


June, 






1,136,200,000 


37,900,000 


34,000,000 


46,600,000 


14.70 


50,200,000 


July, 






1,182,600,000 


38,100,000 


32,600,000 


62,200,000 


14.69 


48,100,000 


August, . 






1,150,800,000 


37,100,000 


29,600,000 


50,100,000 


14.61 


49,500,000 


September, 






1,134,700,000 


37,800,000 


32,300,000 


51,200,000 


14.58 


50,900,000 


October, . 






1,257,700,000 


40,600,000 


32,300,000 


68,700,000 


14.62 


50,900,000 


November, 






1,190,600,000 


39,700,000 


34,400,000- 


57,200,000 


14.74 


50,100,000 


December, 






1,800,200,000 


58,100,000 


40,100,000 


98,800,000 


14.93 


55,000,000 


Total, 


18,067,200,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Averages, 








49,500,000 


38,900,000 


78,000,000 


15.05 


54,500,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



253 



Chaklestown Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impellers or wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 
8.25 feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: two, 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift ; one, 60,000,000 

gallons, with 8-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 47,400,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 32,500,000 gallons. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 3 firemen, 6 screenmen and 1 reliefman. 
Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3.98 to $4.09 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1902 

January, . 

February, 

March, . . 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, . 

September, 

October, . 

November, 

December, 






1,055,600,000 
956,400,000 

1,288,500,000 

1,038,200,000 
951,200,000 
872,500,000 
931,500,000 
886,600,000 
916,100,000 
966,100,000 
900,600,000 

1,105,600,000 


34,100,000 
34,200,000 
41,600,000 
34,600,000 
30,700,000 
29,100,000 
30,000,000 
28,600,000 
30,500,000 
31,200,000 
30,000,000 
35,700,000 


26,300,000 
24,300,000 
33,600,000 
28,100,000 
22,800,000 
22,800,000 
24,200,000 
24,900,000 
25,200,000 
24,800,000 
24,200,000 
28,300,000 


45,300,000 
53,600,000 
56,700,000 
55,700,000 
34,800,000 
34,500,000 
39,300,000 
32,700,000 
35,100,000 
42,800,000 
35,000,000 
49,500,000 


7.99 
8.06 
8.68 
8.11 
7.63 
7.63 
7.72 
7.71 
7.70 
7.77 
7.59 
8.08 


49,800,000 
48,700,000 
58,200,000 
48,400,000 
44,800,000 
43,500,000 
48,300,000 
41,300,000 
46,300,000 
47,800,000 
45,000,000 
46,500,000 


Total, 
Averages, . 


11,868,900,000 

_ 

j 


32,500,000 


25,800,000 


42,900,000 


7.89 


47,400,000 



254 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Ale wife Brook Pumping Station. 
The plant at this station consists of the original installation of 
small commercial pumps and engines, i.e., two 9-inch Andrews 
vertical centrifugal pumps, with direct-connected compound marine 
engines, together with the recent additions. The latter consist of a 
specially designed engine of the vertical cross-compound type, hav- 
ing between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a horizontal 
axis. 

Contract capacity of the two original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump : 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year : 20,700,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,742,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 2 engineers and 1 laborer. 

Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $4.23 to $6.95 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 

per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1902 

January, . 






156,089,000 


5,035,000 


3,814,000 


7,403,000 


13.18 


23,300,000 


February, 






128,324,000 


4,583,000 


3,229,000 


10,531,000 


13.14 


24,700,000 


March, 






214,729,000 


6,927,000 


5,494,000 


11,127,000 


13.05 


29,500,000 


April, 






160,462,000 


5,349,000 


2,978,000 


7,698,000 


13.25 


25,400,000 


May, 






105,228,000 


3,394,000 


2,692,000 


4,738,000 


13.16 


20,000,000 


June, 






86,577,000 


2,886,000 


2,204,000 


3,478,000 


13.13 


18,900,000 


July, 






80,077,000 


2,583,000 


1,700,000 


4,143,000 


13.10 


18,100,000 


August, . 






76,265,000 


2,460,000 


1,784,000 


4,201,000 


13.04 


16,700,000 


September, 






73,591,000 


2,453,000 


1,868,000 


3,526,000 


12.97 


16,000,000 


October, . 






86,685,000 


2,796,000 


1,994,000 


6,076,000 


13.00 


17,700,000 


November, 






73,913,000 


2,464,000 


1,910,000 


3,910,000 


13.06 


17,300,000 


December, 






123,185,000 


3,974,000 


2,330,000 


7,639,000 


13.02 


20,700,000 


Total, 


1,365,125,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Averages, 






- 


3,742,000 


2,666,000 


6,206,000 


13.09 


20,700,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



255 



Quincy Pumping Station. 
At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines. 

Contract capacity of pumps: one, 3,000,000 gallons, the other, 5,000,000 gallons, with 36- 
foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 31,400,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 2,229,000 gallons. 
Force employed: 3 engineers. 
Coal used : first-quality Cumberland, costing from $4.75 to $5.25 per ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 

per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lba. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1902 

January, . 


• 


82,111,000 


2,649,000 


2,164,000 


3,738,000 


39.29 


30,600,000 


February, 






65,701,000 


2,346,000 


1,706,000 


3,703,000 


37.07 


30,500,000 


March, 






116,637,000 


3,762,000 


3,129,000 


5,746,000 


42.53 


41,600,000 


April, 






89,340,000 


2,978,000 


2,350,000 


4,161,000 


40.24 


38,500,000 


May, 






69,045,000 


2,227,000 


1,915,000 


3,840,000 


34.89 


31,500,000 


June, 






57,614,000 


1,920,000 


1,713,000 


2,111,000 


34.08 


31,900,000 


Juiy, 






54,404,000 


1,755,000 


1,472,000 


2,096,000 


32.88 


31,600,000 


August, . 






51,348,000 


1,656,000 


1,508,000 


1,761,000 


S2.62 


28,700,000 


September, 






49,340,000 


1,645,000 


1,470,000 


1,856,000 


32.89 


29,700,000 


October, . 






53,280,000 


1,719,000 


1,552,000 


1,900,000 


31.66 


27,500,000 


November, 






52,356,000 


1,745,000 


1,488,000 


1,838,000 


26.23 


24,300,000 


December, 






72,831,000 


2,349,000 


1,807,000 


3,022,000 


32.48 


30,000,000 


Total, 


814,007,000 




- 


- 


- 


- 


Averages, 






- 


2,229,000 


1,856,000 


2,981,000 


34.74 


31,400,000 



256 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



In the following tables the total cost of pumping and the rate per 
million foot-gallons at each of the five pumping stations are shown 
in detail : — 

Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station. 

Volume (18,814.8 Million Gallons) X Lift (11.40 Feet) = 214,489 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 





Cost 


Cost. 


per Million 




Foot-gallons. 


$10,896 58 


$0.05080 


6,741 94 


.03143 


158 96 


.00074 


38 60 


.00018 


1,263 20 


.00589 


155 08 


.00072 


1,252 60 


.00584 


$20,506 96 


$0.09560 



Labor 

Coal, 

Oil 

"Waste, 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (18,067.2 Million Gallons) x Lift (15.05 Feet) =271,911 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Coet. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil, 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 



$10,322 05 

8,046 46 

160 67 

32 71 

850 80 

60 83 

1,294 64 



$20,768 16 



$0.03796 
.02959 
.00059 
.00012 
.00313 
.00022 
.00476 



$0.07637 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (10,854.4 Million Gallons) X Lift (7.89 Feet) =85,641 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, . . . . 



$10,146 41 

3,389 97 

204 61 

70 82 

443 60 

81 93 

1,001 94 



$15,339 28 



$0.11848 
.03958 
.00239 
.00083 
.00518 
.00096 
.01169 



$0.17911 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



257 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,365.13 Million Gallons) X Lift (13.09 Feet) =17,869 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil, 

"Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 



$3,047 68 

1,321 24 

174 54 

38 19 

216 83 

26 78 

351 94 



Totals, 



$5,177 20 



$0.17055 
.07394 
.00977 
.00214 
.01213 
.00149 
.01969 



$0.28971 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (814.00 Million Gallons) X Lift (34.74 Feet) = 28,279 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste, ....... 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 



Totals, 



$3,259 31 

1,625 78 

41 20 

10 03 

137 76 

15 14 

457 61 



$5,546 83 



$0.11526 
.05749 
.00146 
.00036 
.00487 
.00054 
.01618 



$0.19616 



Material Intercepted at the Screens. 
The sewage of the North Metropolitan District, on entering the 
three main line pumping stations and before reaching the pumps, 
is screened through cages, provided in duplicate, and raised or low- 
ered by steam power. This intercepted material consists of rags, 
paper and other floating matter, and amounted to a total of about 
1,540 cubic yards during the year. This is equivalent to about 2.2 
cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage pumped at Deer Island. 



Care of Special Structures. 
During the year, an additional salt-water suction pipe has been 
provided at the southeasterly end of the Deer Islaud pumping sta- 
tion. This consists of a 12-inch cast-iron pipe, resting for the 
greater part of its length upon a pile structure carried out to a point 
nearly 400 feet beyond high water, with platform at an elevation of 
about 16 feet above high water. The pipe is turned down at the 



258 WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. [P. D. 57. 

4 

end of this structure into a depth of about 6 feet of water at low tide, 
so as to remain submerged under extreme tidal conditions. The ap- 
proval of this work by the Harbor and Land Commissioners was 
given on March 28, and by the War Department on April 30, 1902. 
The piles were driven by contract, and the remainder of the work 
was carried out by the maintenance staff. 

About 250 tons of riprap were deposited over the Deer Island 
limb of the Shirley Gut siphon. This was required as a protection 
to that portion of the siphon which had been partially denuded by 
changes in the bed of the channel at this point. The riprap forms 
a protecting cover 3 feet in thickness. Permission for this work 
had been obtained from the Harbor and Land Commissioners on 
May 4, 1899, and from the War Department on June 15, 1899. 

A permanent house has been placed over the shaft on the Charles- 
town shore end of the sewer crossing under the Mystic River. A 
contract for the work was entered into with Woodbury & Leighton, 
of Boston, on June 16, 1902, and the work was completed in August. 
The structure consists of a brick house 14 feet square and 9 feet 
high, with granite base course and other trimmings. It is covered 
with a tile roof, surmounted with a rotary ventilator intended to 
extract the oases which would otherwise accumulate in the shaft. 

The usual studies of the flow in the Metropolitan sewers, siphons 
and outfall have been maintained. They indicate a desirable free- 
dom from deposit, and satisfactory conditions generally. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Boston, January 1, 1903. 



WM. M. BROWN, 

Engineer, Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 



APPENDIX. 



260 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 1. 



Contracts made and pending during 
(Contracts relating to the 

[Note. — The details of contracts made before 



1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



a. 

WORK. 



166 

183t 

210 

229 1 



246 



247 



257 



Excavating soil, 
Excavating soil, 
Excavating soil, 



Excavating soil from the 
Wachueett Reservoirand 
building a part of Worces- 
ter street in West Boyls- 
ton, Mass. 

Section 3 of relocation of 
Central Massachusetts 
Railroad, Clinton, Mass. 



Section 4 of relocation of 
Central Massachusetts 
Railroad, West Boylston, 
Mass. 

Excavating soil from Sec- 
tion 10 of the Wachusett 
Reservoir in Boylston 
and West Boylston, 
Mass. 



Total, 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 



5. 

Lowest. 



$1,248,400 00 
238,500 00* 
377,830 00 

10,796 95 



-t 



51,561 00 



449,300 00 



$1,096,300 00* 
230,685 00 
360,870 00* 

10,206 50* 



-X 



50,772 25* 



414,987 50* 



6. 



Contractor. 



Nawn & Brock, 

Long & Little, 

Newell & Snowling Con- 
struction Company. 

MeskillBros. & Leahy, 
Everett, Mass. 



Nawn & Brock, Boston, 
Mass. 



George M. Atkins &Co., 
Palmer, Mass. 



Bruno, Salomone & 
Petitti, Boston, Mass. 



* Contract based upon this bid. f Contract completed. 

X Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



261 



Appendix No. 1. 



the Year 1902 — Water Works. 
Reservoir Department. 

1902 have been given in previous reports.] 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 


11. 


12. 




Date 
of Contract. 


Date for 

Completion of 

Contract. 


Date of Final 
Estimate. 


Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1902. 


Amount of 
Contract. 


Value of 
Work done 
Dec. 31,1902. 




June 13, '99, 


Dec. 1, '02, 


- 


- 


$1,008,000 00 


$978,302 48 


1 


Dec. 12, '99, 


July 1, '03, 


Sept. 30, '02, 


- 


220,003 15 


220,003 15 


2 


Aug. l.'Ol, 


Nov. 1, '04, 


- 


- 


360,870 00 


181,113 59 


3 


April 4, '02, 


Sept. 1, '02, 


Oct. 10, '02, 


For earth excavation, $0.25, 


9,263 95 


9,263 95 


4 


May 6, '02, 


Jan. 1, '03, 




For earth excavation, $0.24 
per cu. yd.; rock excava- 
tion, $1.50 per cu. yd.; 
soil deposited in embank- 
ments, $0.15 additional; 
broken stone or screened 
gravel in place, $1 per 
cu. yd.; Portland cement 
concrete masonry, $6 per 
cu. yd.; dimension stone 
masonry, $15 and $20 per 
cu. yd. 


38,777 60 


24,860 10 


5 


June 5, '02, 


April 20, '03, 




For earth excavation, $0.28 
per cu. yd.; slope paving, 
$2.60 percu. yd.; riprap, 
$1 per cu. yd. 


50,772 25 


36,564 94 


6 


Dec. 27, '02, 


Nov. 1, '05, 


• 


For clearing and grubbing, 
$100 per acre; soil exca- 
vation, $0,265, $0.30 and 
$0.34 per cu. yd.; earth 
excavation, $0.34 per cu. 
yd.; rock excavation, $1.70 
percu. yd.; paving, $1.90 
and $1 . 75 per cu . yd . ; Port- 
land cement concrete ma- 
sonry, $7 per cu. yd. 


414,987 50 




7 




$2,102,674 45 


$1,450,108 21 





262 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the 

Contracts relating to the 



i. 

Num- 

ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



2.. 

WORK. 



195 

223f 
243f 

244 



245 



252 



Special 
Order.f 



Special 
Order.f 



Wachusett Dam, 



78 tons special castings, 

Bronze grooves for Wachu. 
sett Dam. 



Section 1 of relocation of 
Central Massachusetts 
Railroad, Berlin and 
Clinton, Mass. 



Section 2 of relocation of 
Central Massachusetts 
Railroad, Clinton, Mass. 
(extension of Contract 
No. 195). 



Steel bridges on the reloca- 
tion of the Central Massa- 
chusetts Division of Bos- 
ton & Maine Railroad, 
Berlin and Clinton, Mass. 

Furnishing 8 24-inch and 
4 48-inch hydraulic lift 
valves and 4 48-inch screw 
lift valves. 

13.5 tons special castings, 



Total, 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



11 

2 
-J 

12 



-x 



Amodnt op Bid. 



4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 



5. 

Lowest. 



$1,680,870 00 
7,416 65 



37,691 25 



-t 



94,500 00 



16,528 00 



$1,603,635 00* 

6,651 56* 

-t 



36,767 50* 



-i 



91,450 00* 



14,512 00* 



1,014 00* 



6. 

Contractor. 



McArthur Bros. Com- 
pany. 

Camden Iron Works, . 

The Wm. Cramp & Sons 
Ship and Engine 
Building Company, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Crary Construction 
Company, New York, 
N. Y. 



McArthur Bros. Com- 
pany. 



American Bridge Com- 
pany of New York, 
New York, N. Y. 



Chapman Valve Manu- 
facturing Company. 



Taunton Locomotive 
Manufacturing Com- 
pany. 



Contracts relating to the 



9 


214f 


Excavating mud and earth 
from Snake Brook 
Meadow. 


8 


$17,225 00 


$16,850 00* 


Long & Little, 


10 


238 


Excavating mud and earth 
from Pegan Brook 
Meadow In Natick, build- 
ing embankments and 
facing them with gravel. 


4 


42,790 00 


35,810 00* 


Auguste Saucier, South 
Framingham, Mass. 



* Contract based upon this bid. t Contract completed. 

X Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



263 



Year 1902 — Water Works — Continued. 
Dam and Aqueduct Department. 



7. 

Date 
of Contract. 



8. 

Date for 

Completion of 

Contract. 



9. 

Date of Final 
Estimate. 



10. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1902. 



11. 

Amount of 
Contract. 



12. 

Value of 
"Work done 
Dec. 31, 1902, 



Oct. 1, '00, 

Nov. 25, '01, 
July 3, '02, 



May 26,' 02, 



April 18, '02, 



July 23, '02, 



Nov.'27, »01, 



Dec. 14, '01, 



Nov. 15, '04, 

June 1, '02, 
Oct. 1,'02, 



Dec. 15, '02, 



April 18, '03, 



April 1, '03, 



April 15, '02, 



April 15, '02, 



Dec. 2, '02, 
Oct. 2, '02, 



For whole work, $3,660, 



For earth excavation, $0.32 
per cu. yd.; borrowed 
earth, $0.30 per cu. yd.; 
rock excavation, $1 per cu. 
yd.; Portland cement con- 
crete masonry, $7.50 and 
$5.50 per cu. yd.; split 
stone masonry, $13.50 per 
cu. yd.; dimension stone 
masonry, $20 per cu. yd. 

For rock excavation, $1.50 
per cu. yd. ; rock excavated 
and disposed of as riprap, 
$2 per cu. yd.; tunnel ex- 
cavation, $5 per cu. yd.; 
Portland cement concrete 
masonry, in tunnel, $7 and 
$6 per cu. yd. 

For whole work, $91,450, . 



Aug. 5, '02, 



May 7, '02, 



$1,603,635 00 

7,848 78 
3,660 00 



36,767 60 



236,621 00 



91,450 00 



14,512 00 



1,203 37 



$1,995,697 65 



$555,550 00 

7,848 78 
3,660 00 



29,570 00 



118,300 00 



14,512 00 



1,203 37 



$730,644 15 



Sudbury Department, 



Sept. 11, '01, 



May 8, '02, 



Dec. 15, '01, 



Dec. 1, '02, 



Feb. 7, '02, 



For mud excavation, $0.22| 
per cu. yd. ; gravel excava- 
tion, $0.36 per cu. yd. 



$14,196 49 $14,196 49 9 



46,460 96 



),657 45 



46,460 96 



$60,657 45 



10 



264 



'METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the 

Contracts relating to the 



1. 

Num 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



2. 



WORK. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



1 


199 


2 


200 


3 


201f 


4 


202 


5 


203 


•6 


204 


7 


205 


8 


208f 


9 


211 


10 


212 


11 


213 


12 


218 


13 


219 


14 


220 


15 


224 


16 


226f 


17 


228 



8ection 2, Weston Aque- 
duct. 

Section 3, Weston Aque- 
duct. 

Section 4, Weston Aque- 
duct. 

Section 5, Weston Aque- 
duct. 

Section 6, Weston Aque- 
duct. 

Section 12, Weston Aque- 
duct. 

Section 13, Weston Aque- 
duct. 



Castings for siphon cham- 
ber. 

Sections 8 and 10, Weston 
Aqueduct. 

Section 11, Weston Aque- 
duct. 

Section 15, Weston Aque- 
duct. 

Section 14, Weston Aque- 
duct (open channel and 
upper portion of reser- 
voir). 

Section 1 of the Weston 
Reservoir (central por- 
tion). 

Section 2 of the Weston 
Reservoir (lower portion 
of reservoir, including 
dam and concrete drain) . 

2 60-inch Venturi meters, 
34 tons special castings, 



Sections 7 and 9, Weston 
Aqueduct, riveted steel 
pipe line 7| feet in diam- 
eter, including an arch of 
the pipe of about 80 feet 
span, with masonry abut- 
ments, across the Sud- 
bury River in Framing- 
ham and Wayland, Mass. 



9 

19 
16 
14 

16 



4 
11 
10 

5 
10 

11 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 



o. 

Lowest. 



$234,581 50 
131,226 10 
68,810 50 
139,023 00 
121,497 00 
139,197 50 
364,884 00 

11,340 00 
155,508 50 
157,270 00 
197,556 00 

68,364 00 

64,971 25 
90,152 50 

-X 

2,339 10 
147,788 00 



$200,477 00* 
127,507 50* 
64,888 50* 
137,526 50* 
120,646 50* 
134,096 50* 
346,290 00* 

10,908 00* 
146,139 00* 
148,635 00* 
171,645 00* 

58,490 00* 

59,587 50* 
88,292 50* 

-X 

2,235 70* 
134,990 00* 



6. 



Contractor. 



Shanahan, Casparis & 
Co. 

Shanahan, Casparis & 
Co. 

Patrick McGovern, 



Bruno, Salomone & 
Petitti. 

Shanahan, Casparis & 
Co. 

Shanahan, Casparis & 
Co. 

Michael H. Keefe as- 
signed on Oct. 12, 1901, 
to Columbus Con- 
struction Company. 

Henry R. Worthington, 
Winston 8c Co., 
Winston & Co., 
Winston & Co., 
Nawn & Brock, 

Nawn & Brock, 
Nawn & Brock, 



Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 

Camden Iron Works, 
Camden, N. J. 

Edward Kendall & Sons, 
Cambridgeport, Mass. 



* Contract based upon this bid. t Contract completed. 

\ Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



2S5 



Year 1902 — Water Works — Continued. 
Weston Aqueduct Department. 



7. 



8. 



Date Date for 



9. 

Date of Final 
Estimate. 



10. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1902. 



11. 

Amount of 
Contract. 



12. 

Value of 
Work done 
Dec. 81, 1902 



May 9, '01 

May 9, '01 

May 6, '01 

May 8, '01 

May 9, '01 

May 9, '01 

May 20, '01 

May 21, '01 
Aug. 28, '01 
Aug. 28, '01 
Aug. 28, '01 
Nov. 26, '01 

Nov. 26, '01 
Nov. 26, '01 

Jan. 11, '02 
Jan. 30, '02 
Mar. 8, '02 



Aug. 1, '03, 

Aug. 1, '03, 

Aug. 1, '03, | Sept. i 

Aug. 1, '03, 

Aug. 1,'03, 

Aug. 1, '03, 

Aug. 1, '03, 

April 1, '02, May 29, '02, 

Aug. 1, '03, 

Aug. 1, '03, 

Aug. 1, '03, 

Aug. 1, '03, 

Aug. 1, '03, 

Aug. 1, '03, 



April 26, '02, 



For whole work, $7,200, 



July 1, '02, ! Aug. 5, '02, For all castings, 

of 2,000 lbs. 



July 1, '03, 



per ton 



For earth excavation, $0.40 
and $0.70 per cu.yd.; fur- 
nishing, laying and testing 
7|-f oot pipe, $21 .30 per lin. 
ft.; Portland cement con- 
crete masonry, $7 and $6 
per cu . yd . ; stone masonry, 
$40 per cu yd. 



$200,477 00 
127,507 50 
61,161 69 
129,300 00 
112,600 00 
134,096 50 
403,000 00 

11,258 00 
146,139 00 
148,635 00 
171,645 00 

58,490 00 

59,587 50 
88,292 50 

7,200 00 

2,284 84 

134,990 00 



$136,500 00 


88,500 00 


61,161 69 


119,300 00 


78,700 00 


95,900 00 


253,800 00 


11,258 00 


80,000 00 


95,000 00 


97,200 00 


31,600 00 


9,900 00 


38,200 00 


6,180 00 


2,284 84 


116,400 00 



1 

2 

3 
4 
5 

6 
7 

S 
9 

10 
11 
12 

13 
14 

15 
16 
17 



266 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



2. 

WORK. 



236t 



241 1 



242f 



250 



256f 



258 



Distribution of 60-inch 
cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings, South- 
borough, Mass. 



Cast-iron columns 
grooves. 



and 



Steel work for chambers, . 



Section 1, Weston Aque- 
duct, laying 3 60-inch cast- 
iron pipe lines, each about 
480 feet long, including 
special castings aud out- 
let branches; a 48-inch 
cast-iron pipe line about 
275ft. long; building out- 
let and head chambers 
and an arch bridge of 30 
ft. span, Southborough, 
Mass. 



Blow-off for steel pipe si- 
phon on Section 9, Wes- 
ton Aqueduct, Wayland, 
Mass. 



Superstructures of 4 siphon 
and 2 gaging chambers of 
the Weston Aqueduct, 
Framingham and Way- 
land, Mass. 



Total, 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



10 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 



$2,905 00 

3,212 00 

32,110 00 



2,351 25 



29,315 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



-X 

$2,780 10* 

3,000 00* 

29,030 00* 



2,306 25* 



27,352 00* 



6. 

Contractor. 



L. F. Childs, Framing, 
ham, Mass. 



Davis & Farnum Manu- 
facturing Company, 
Waltham, Mass. 

G. W. & F. Smith Iron 
Company, Boston, 
Mass. 

T. H.Gill & Co., Somer- 
ville, Mass. 



T. Bruno, Boston, Mass. 



The Norcross Bros. 
Company, Boston, 
Mass. 



Contracts relating to the 



206 1 



209 f 



Masonry water tower on 
Forbes Hill, Quincy, 
Mass. 

Bear Hill Reservoir in 
Stoneham, Mass. 



$24,973 00 



19,456 00* 



$24,790 00* 



16,950 00 



J. E. McCoy, . 



The C. H. Eglee Com- 
pany. 



* Contract based upon this bid. f Contract completed. 

X Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 



267 



the Year 1902 — Water Works — Continued. 
Weston Aqueduct Department — Concluded. 



7. 

Date 
of Contract. 



8. 

Date for 

Completion of 

Contract. 



9. 

Date of Final 

Estimate. 



10. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1902. 



11. 

Amount of 
Contract. 



13. 

Value of 
Work done 
Dec. 31, 1902. 



Mar. 20, '02, 

April 30, '02, 
April 30, '02, 
June 19, '02, 



July 15, '02, 



July 1, '02, 



July 1, '03, 



Dec. 1, '02, 



Oct. 2, '02, 



Oct. 2, '02, 



Oct. 30, '02, 



Dec. 1, '02, 



Dec. 1, '02, 



Dec. 18, '02, 



Aug. 1, '03, 



For hauling and distributing 
60-inch pipes and special 
castings, $1.25 per ton of 
2,000 lbs. 

Castings for Wachusett Dam, 
$504 . 50 ; f or Weston Aque- 
duct, $2,275.60. 

Steel work for Wachusett 
Dam, $230; for Weston 
Aqueduct, $2,770. 

For constructing, maintain- 
ing and removing tempo- 
rary works, $800; earth 
excavation, $0.38 per cu. 
yd.; rock excavation, $2 
per cu. yd.; Portland ce- 
ment concrete masonry, 
$6.90 and $6 percu. yd.; 
ashlar masonry, $22 per 
cu. yd.; dimension stone 
masonry, $40 per cu. yd.; 
dry rubble stone paving, 
$4 per cu. yd.; laying and 
connecting cast-iron pipes 
and special castings, 
$1,000. 

For laying 12-inch cast-iron 
pipe and 24-inch vitrified 
clay pipe, including exca- 
vation of trench, $1.25 per 
lin. ft.; earth excavation 
from open ditch, $0.65 per 
cu. yd. ; dry rubble paving, 
$2 per cu. yd.; riprap, 
$1.50 per cu. yd. 

For each of the siphon cham- 
bers numbered 1 and 2, 
$4,573; numbered 3 and 4, 
$5,522; for gaging cham- 
bers, $3,360 and $3,802. 



$1,043 88 



2,712 10 



3,000 00 



29,030 00 



2,191 94 



27,352 00 



$2,061,994 45 



$1,043 88 



2,712 10 



3,000 00 



20,500 00 



2,191 94 



$1,351,332 45 



Distribution Department. 



May 23, '01, 



Nov. 1, '01, 



Dec. 12, '02, 



$25,967 95 



$25,967 95 



July 16, '01, 



Nov. 15, '01, 



July 14, '02, 



24,894 47 



24,894 47 



268 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



2. 

WORK. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



216 



217f 



221t 



222 



225f 



227 



230 



231f 



232f 



233f 



234 f 



9,120 tons cast-iron water 
pipes, 7,800 tons 48-inch, 
1,320 tons 60-inch, 100 
tons special castings. 



9,300 tons cast-iron water 
pipes, 5,800 tons 48-inch, 
3,500 tons 60-inch, 100 
tons special castings. § 



39 water valves, 10 36-inch, 
8 24-inch, 6 16-inch, 15 
12-inch. 

284 tons special castings, § 



17 tons special castings for 
Wachusett Dam and 
"Weston Aqueduct. 



Drain valves, sluice gates, 
steel work and Coffin 
ball-bearing gate stands. 



250 tone special castings, . 



Laying water pipes in Med- 
ford, Section 12 of the 
distribution system. 



120 cast-iron frames and 
covers. 

400 tons cast-iron water 
pipes, 5 tons special cast- 
ings. 

16 sets steel work for cover- 
ing valve chambers. 



-: 



Lot 1-2, 
Lot 2-3, 
Lot 3,t 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 



5. 

Lowest. 



48-inch pipes 
$25,80 per 
ton; special 
casting 
$60 per 



ton 



-t 



$12,650 00 
23,727 64 

1,138 50 



3,380 00 
253 00 
-t 



19,370 00 
36,654 50 



875 00 
10,505 00 

1,152 00 



6. 

Contractor. 



United States Cast Iron 
Pipe and Foundry 
Company. 



United States Cast Iron 
Pipe and Foundry 
Company. 



48-inch pipes, 1 
$22.87 per 
ton; special; 
castings, $59 
per ton.* 

48-inch pipes, 
$23.87 per 
ton; 60-inch 
pipes, $26 90 
per ton; spe- 
cial castings. 
$75 per ton.* 



$11,940 00* i Geo. F. Blake Manufac- 
turing Company. 



22,894 25* 



847 50* 



2,061 00* 
220 00* 
-t 



15,500 00* 
36,245 00* 



850 00* 



10,405 00* 



1,056 00* 



Geo. F. Blake Manufac- 
turing Company. 



Davis & Farnum Manu- 
facturing Company, 
Waltham, Mass. 



/Coffin Valve Company, 
( Boston, Mass. 



Camden Iron Works, 
Camden, N.J. 

C. E. Trumbull & Co., 
Boston, Mass. 



Osgood & Witherly, 
Somerville, Mass. 

United States Cast Iron 
Pipe and Foundry 
Company, New York, 
N.T. 

New England Structural 
Company, Boston, 
Mass. 



* Contract based upon this bid. f Contract completed. 

X Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 

§ Includes pipes and castings supplied to other departments. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



269 



the Year 1902 — Water Works — Continued. 
Distribution Department — Continued. 



7. 

Date 
of Contract. 



8. 

Date for 

Completion of 

Contract. 



9. 

Date of Final 
Estimate. 



10. 

Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1902. 



11. 

Amount of 
Contract. 



12. 

Value of 
Work done 
Dec. 31,1902. 



Nov. 21, »01, 



Nov. 21, '01, 



Dec. 1, '02, 



Dec. 1, '02, 



Nov. 12, '02, 



Nov. 30, '01, 



Nov. 25, '01, 



Jan. 30, '02, 



Jan. 24, '02, 



Aug. 30, '02, 



Sept. 1, '02, 



May 1, '02, 



Dec. 19, '02, 



June 11, '02, 



Mar. 6, 
April 3, 



'02, 
'02, 



Dec. 1, '02, 



Oct. 1, '02, 



Dec. 1, '02, 



Mar. 11, 
Mar. 10, 



'02, 



'02, 



Mar. 11, '02, 



June 11, '02, 



July 1, '02, 



Aug. 11, '02, 



Dec. 15, '02, 



July 15, '02, 



July 25, '02, 



Note. — After bids were re- 
ceived for contracts 213 
and 217 the amount of pipe 
to be furnished was in- 
creased at the prices bid 
before making the con- 
tracts. At a subsequent 
date contract No. 216 was 
further extended by the 
addition of 220 tons of 60- 
inch pipes at $28.90 per 
ton, and contract No. 217 
was increased by the addi- 
tion of 140 tons 60-inch and 
210 tons 48-inch pipe at the 
prices bid. 



Note. — To obtain the cast- 
ings called for by this con- 
tract at the required time, 
portions of them were 
obtained under contracts 
Nos. 260 and 261. 

For curves, flanged pipes and 
platform supports, $50 per 
ton of 2,000 lbs.; double 
branches, curves and spe- 
cial bell pipes, $65 per ton 
of 2,000 lbs. 

Lot 1, 11 drain valves and 4 
sluice gates, $2,061; Lot 2, 
steel work, $220; Lot 3, 4 
Coffin ball-bearing gate 
stands, $1,560. 

For all castings, $62 per ton 
of 2,000 lbs. 

For laying 48-inch cast-iron 
pipes, $2.60 per lin. ft.; 
rock excavation, $2 per cu. 
yd.; brick chambers for 
valves, $75 and $50 each ; 
concrete masonry, $7 per 
cu. yd. 

For castings, $.017 per lb., . 



For 12-inch cast-iron pipe, 
$25.40; special castings, 
$49 per ton of 2,000 lbs. 



For steel work for covering 
valve chambers, $66 per 
set. 



$213,876 00 



242,236 53 



11,940 00 
18,120 92 

934 95 

3,841 00 

15,500 00 
44,431 59 



1,136 91 
10,702 64 

1,056 00 



$212,270 90 



242,236 53 



11,940 00 
18,082 72 

934 95 

3,741 00 

13,685 11 
44,431 59 



1,136 91 
10,702 64 

1,056 00 



270 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



2. 



WORK. 



3. 

Num. 
ber of 
Bids. 



235 



237 



239t 



240 



248f 



249f 



251 



Laying water pipes in New- 
ton, Section 2 of the sup- 
ply pipe lines. 



Laying water pipes in 
Brighton and Newton, 
Section 4 of the supply 
pipe lines. 



Laying water pipes in Hyde 
Park, Section 30 of the 
distribution system. 



Laying water pipes in Med- 
ford. 



60 tons special castings, . 



45 water valves and 3 sluice 
gates. 



Laying water pipes in 
Newton and Weston, in- 
cluding crossing of 
Charles River. 



-X 



Amount or Bid. 



4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 



$53,121 75 



34,430 00 



8,243 25 



60,255 00 



3,120 00 
-t 

34,155 00 



5. 

Lowest. 



$50,976 00* 



28,363 00* 



6. 

Contractor. 



7,882 15* 



52,925 00* 



3,000 00* 



-t 



33,564 00* 



D. F. O'Connell, Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



Thomas F. Moore, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. 



T.Bruno, Boston, Mass. 



Coleman Bros., Everett, 
Mass. 



Warren Foundry and 
Machine Company, 
Phillipsburg, N. J. 

Coffin Valve Company, 
Boston, Mass. 



Ward & Cummings, 
Boston, Mass. 



* Contract based upon this bid. f Contract completed. 

Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 



•No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



271 



the Year 1902 — Water Works — Continued. 
Distribution Department — Continued. 



7. 

Date 
of Contract. 



8. 

Date for 

Completion of 

Contract. 



9. 

Date of Final 
Estimate. 



10. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1902. 



11. 

Amount of 
Contract. 



12. 

Value of 
Work done 
Dec. 31, 1902. 



April 7, '02, 



Dec. 1, '02, 



April 18, '02, 



Nov. 1, '02, 



April 28, '02, 



July 15, '02, 



Sept. 17, '02, 



May 2, '02, 



Dec. 15, '02, 



May 19, '02, 



May 19, '02, 



July 26, *02, 



Oct. 15, '02, 



Nov. 1, '02, 



June 15, '03, 



Oct. 15, '02, 



Dec. 26, '02, 



For laying cast-iron pipes : 
48-inch, $2.21, 36-inch, $2 
per lin. ft.; rock excava- 
tion, $3.50 and $5 per cu. 
yd. ; earth excavation, $1 
and $0.65 per cu. yd.; set- 
ting air valves, $5 each ; 
chambers for valves, blow- 
offs, etc., $75 and $30 ; lay- 
ing sewer pipe for drains : 
8-inch, $0.37, 10-inch, 
$0.39, 12-inch, $0.45, 15- 
inch, $0.50, 18-inch, $0.65, 
20-inch, $1 per lin. ft.; 
man-holes and catch-bas- 
ins for drains, $30 and $45, 
respectively; concrete ma- 
sonry, $5 per cu. yd. 

For laying 48-inch cast-iron 
pipes, $2.19 per lin. ft.; 
rock excavation, $2.50 
and $6 per cu. yd.; earth 
excavation, $0.50 per cu. 
yd ; chambers for valves, 
blow-offs, etc., $62 and 
$34; concrete masonry, 
$5.25 per cu. yd. 

For laying cast-iron pipes : 
12-inch, $0.53, 12-inch with 
flexible joint, $9 per lin. 
ft.; rock excavation, $4 
and $5 per cu. yd.; brick 
chambers for valves, $45 ; 
concrete masonry, $8 per 
cu. yd. 

For earth excavation, $0.50 
per cu.yd.; rock excava- 
tion, $2 per cu. yd.; lay- 
ing 60-inch cast-iron water 
pipes, $3.50 per lin. ft.; 
chambers for blow-offs 
and valves, $100; concrete 
masonry, $6 per cu. yd. 

For castings, $50 per ton of 
2,000 lbs. 

For valves : 12-inch, $121; 16- 
inch, $160. For sluice 
gates with wall plates : 30- 
inch, $415; 12-inch, $150. 

For building and maintain- 
ing coffer-dam and pump- 
ing and draining, $14,887. 
For laying cast-iron water 
pipes: 60-inch, $3.25 and 
$4.85, 48-inch, $3, 36-inch, 
$2.90 per lin. ft.; rock ex- 
cavation, $4 per cu. yd.; 
earth excavation, $0.80 
per cu. yd.; chambers for 
valves, blow-offs, etc., $98 
and $65; concrete ma- 
sonry, $7 per cu. yd. 



$71,000 00 



$70,100 00 



28,363 00 



26,600 00 



7,602 81 



7,602 81 



57,500 00 



56,700 00 



2,901 30 



7,205 00 



33,564 00 



2,901 30 



7,205 00 



24,300 00 



272 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 

Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
traot. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 


253 


42 Venturi meter tubes 
with registers and chart 
recorders. 


-J 


-X 


-* 


Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 


2 


254t 


15 12-inch and 6 16-inch 
water valves. 


-X 


-X 


-t 


Coffin Valve Company, 
Boston, Mass. 


3 


255f 


35 steel chambers for Ven- 
turi meter registers. 


4 


$8,050 00 


$6,125 00* 


Daniel Russell Boiler 
Works, Boston, Mass. 


4 


260 f 


70,830 lbs. special castings, 


-X 


-t 


-X 


United States Cast Iron 
Pipe and Foundry 
Company, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 


5 


261t 


44,610 lbs. special castings, 


-X 


-X 


-X 


Taunton Locomotive 
Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Taunton, Mass. 


6 


4-M 


2 vertical fire-tube boilers, 


4 


12,880 00 


12,500 00* 


The I. P. Morris Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 


7 


5-M 


Excavating material and 
building a trestle and 
coffer-dam at the Mystic 
River, Somerville. 


-J 


-t 


-X 


Lawler Bros., Boston, 
Mass. 


8 


Special 
Order.f 


50 tons cast-iron water 
pipes, 9,600 lbs. special 
castiDgs at Berlin and 
Wayland. 


3 


Pipes, $24.90 
per ton; 
special cast- 

, ings,$52per 
ton. 


Pipes, $24.40 
per ton; 
special cast- 
ings $54.40 
per ton.* 


United States Cast Iron 
Pipe and Foundry 
Company, Phillips- 
burg, N. J. 


9 


Special 
Order.f 


43 tons 16-inch pipe, . 


3 


$25.90 per 
ton. 


$25.80 per 
ton * 


Camden Iron Works, 
Camden, N. J. 



* Contract based upon this bid. t Contract completed. 

X Competitive bids were not received on this contract. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



273 



the Year 1902 — Water Works — Continued. 
Distribution Department — Concluded. 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 


11. 


12. 




Date 
of Contract. 


Date for 

Completion of 

Contract. 


Date of Final 
Estimate. 


Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1902. 


Amount of 
Contract. 


Value of 
Work done 
Dec. 31, 1902. 




June 20, '02, 






For 8-inch, $527.85, 10-inch, 
$550.80, 12-inch, $581.40, 
16-inch, $650.25, 20-inch, 
$742.05, 24-inch, $856.80, 
30-inch, $1,063.35, 48-inch, 
$2,279.70 each. 


$31,158 45 


$12,078 95 


1 


Feb. 14, '02, 


- 


Not. 12, '02, 


For 12-inch valves, $121; 16- 
inch valves, $158. 


2,763 00 


2,763 00 


2 


Aug. 4, '02, 


Nov. 1, '02, 


Dec. 9, '02, 


For each chamber, $175, 


6,942 81 


6,942 81 


3 


Aug. 6, '02, 


Sept. 6, '02, 


Nov. 24, »02, 


Note. — Contracts Nos. 260 
and 261 were made to pro- 
vide castings which were 
not furnished at the re- 
quired time under contract 
No. 222. 


3,752 80 


3,752 80 


4 


Aug. 7, '02, 


- 


Oct. 29, '02, 


- 


1,891 58 


1,891 58 


5 


Feb. 24, '02, 


June 30, '02, 


- 


For each boiler, $6,250, 


12,500 00 


11,400 00 


6 


Sept. 26, '02, 


Dec. 1, '02, 


- 


For whole work, $3,600, 


3,694 39 


3,694 39 


7 


Jan. 23, *02, 


- 


May 15, '02, 


For cast-iron pipes, $24.40; 
special castings, $54.40 per 
ton of 2,000 lbs. 


1,514 80 


1,514 80 


8 


Feb. 25, '02, 


May 1, '02, 1 


Mar. 22, '02, 


For cast-iron pipes, $25.80 
per ton of 2,000 lbs. 


1,106 30 


1,106 30 


9 






$888,099 20 


$851,634 51 





274 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1902 — Water Works 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts.* 



Approximate 
Amount of 
Contracts. 



Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1902. 



Wachusett Reservoir, 5 contracts 

Relocation of Central Massachusetts Railroad, 5 contracts, . 

Wachusett Dam, 3 contracts 

Sudbury Department, 2 contracts 

Weston Aqueduct and Reservoir, 23 contracts 

Distribution Department, 25 contracts, 

Total of 63 contracts made and pending during the year 1902, 
203 contracts completed in 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899, 1900 and 1901, . 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city 
of Boston, 



$2,013,124 60 

454,388 35 

1,615,143 78 

60,657 45 

2,061,994 45 

869,283 71 



Total of 266 contracts, 



$7,074,592 34 
7,654,798 39 



$14,729,390 73 
512,000 00 



$14,217,390 73 



$1,388,683 17 

209,295 04 

567,058 78 

60,657 45 

1,351,332 45 

833,919 02 

$4,410,945 91 

7,654,798 39 



$12,065,744 30 
512,000 00 



$11,553,744 30 



* In this summary, contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



275 



Appendix No. 2. 



Cement Tests — Water Works. 
The following tables contain : — 

1 . Long-time tests of cements used by the Dam and Aqueduct and Res- 
ervoir departments during the years 1896 to 1900, inclusive. The tests for 
shorter periods were published in Appendix No. 3 of the annual report for 
the year 1900. 

2. All tests of cements used in the construction of the Wachusett Dam 
during the years 1901 and 1902, including that used on the relocation of 
the Central Massachusetts Railroad during the year 1902. 

3. Tests of all cements used in the construction of the Weston Aqueduct 
during the years 1901 and 1902. 

The methods of testing were the same as described in Appendix No. 3 
of the annual report for the year 1897. 



Tabulation of Cement Tests for All Brands of Natural Cement, of which 
Nine Hundred Barrels or More icere used on Construction Work by 
the Dam and Aqueduct and Reservoir Departments from 1896 to 
1900, Inclusive. 





■a 

s 

OB 

s 


uette. 


Tensile Strength. 




two 


THREE 


FIVE 






N-.CQ 


TEABS. 


YEARS. 


TEAR8. 
















BRAND. 


efl 

pa 


o 

a 


CD 
« 


o 

u a 


CO 
CD 


o 


CO 

CD 


CD 

*. a 




o 




o « 


CDHH 


O <° 


CDl— 1 


O *> 


CDt-H 






? 3 


P. CD 


° 3 


P« CD 


Z 3 


— CD 




CD 


CO 

o 
(X 
Q 


855* 

.3 «- 


'o 2 


CD 5* 


73 a 




03 s 
73 § 




E 


am 


a s. 


s« 


a 5. 

3 O" 


B« 


£ r 




s 


o 


9 


oQQ 


9 


oQQ 


3 


goo 




fe 


D 


S3 


O. 


fc 


Ph 


fc 


P- 




8,380 


\ Neat, 
J 1 to 1, . 


64 
64 


467 
316 


50 
50 


482 
349 


23 
24 


506 
369 




45,345 


J Neat, . 
( 1 to 1, . 


106 
106 


467 
327 


91 
91 


495 
347 


45 
45 


512 
359 




60,877 


t Neat, . 
/ 1 to 1, . 


60 
60 


440 
295 


54 
54 


456 
314 


28 

27 


479 
325 




900 


Neat, . 


22 


409 


10 


474 


4 


476 


\ 1 to 1, . 


22 


570 


10 


617 


4 


576 


Totals 


115,502 


( Neat, . 
\l to 1, . 


252 
252 


456 
338 


205 
205 


480 
352 


100 
100 


500 
361 



276 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Tabulation of Cement Tests for All Brands of Portland Cement, of which 
Nine Hundred Barrels or More were used on Construction Work by 
the Dam and Aqueduct and Reservoir Departments from 1896 to 
1900, Inclusive. 





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Tensile Strength. 




EIGHTEEN 
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TWO 
TEARS. 


THREE 
YEAR8. 


FIVE 
YEARS. 


BRAND. 


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Iron Clad 

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5,706 

15,394 

7,778 

979 

3,394 


I Neat, . 
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65 

65 

5 

5 

55 

55 

34 

34 

8 

8 

19 

19 


848 
324 
674 
521 
598 
426 
769 
396 
665 
370 
586 
522 


80 
80 
55 
55 
55 
55 
34 
34 
51 
53 
59 
59 


813 
325 
702 
447 
622 
422 
800 
394 
714 
340 
589 
434 


64 
64 
53 
53 
45 
45 
26 
26 
42 
42 
51 
51 


814 
336 
696 
449 
618 
414 
826 
378 
709 
332 
570 
424 


26 
26 
27 
27 
12 
12 
6 
6 
22 
21 
29 
26 


782 
322 
679 
453 
614 
435 
736 
394 
695 
300 
562 
391 


Totals, 


51,760 


( Neat, . 
<2tol, . 


186 721 
186 395 


334 
336 


707 
389 


281 
281 


701 

389 


122 
118 


673 
378 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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CD 

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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



279 



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280 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



281 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1902. 



DAY OF MONTH. 


>> 

OS 

S3 
fl 
OS 


>> 

b 

OS 

s 
ft 

x> 
e 
to 


e 

03 


(X 

< 


>> 

OS 
3 


9J 

a 
p 


>> 

P 
"5 


*» 
go 

P 

p 

< 


O 

£> 

a 

• 

p, 

o 


e 

x> 

o 
-** 
a 
O 


a 

• 

o 


s 
S 

V 

e 
<u 

P 


1, • 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.52f 


- 


- 


2, 










* 


0.66§ 


0.55f 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3, 










0.20 J 


- 


- 


- 


0.12f 


0.26f 


0.31t 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.55§ 


4, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.07f 


- 


- 


- 


0.27t 


- 


- 


- 


5, 










- 


- 


1.401 


- 


- 


- 


0.07f 


- 


- 


* 


- 


0.75 J 


6, 










- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


0.60f 


.- 


1.91f 


O.llf 


- 


7, 










* 


- 


- 


0.09J 


- 


0.07f 


- 


- 


0.05f 


- 


- 


0.171 


8, 










0.171 


- 


* 


* 


0.04f 


0.18f 


- 


0.33f 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9, 










- 


- 


0.95§ 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.82f 


- 


- 


- 


10, 










0.031 


- 


- 


2.09f 


- 


0.15f 


0.35f 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.061 


11, 










* 


- 


- 


0.04f 


- 


- 


- 


2.23| 


- 


* 


- 


0.181 


12, 










0.681 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.12f 


* 


- 


13, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.03f 


0.33f 


- 


- 


0.52t 


- 


0.21t 


* 


14, 










- 


- 


0.08f 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.18t 


15, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


O.llf 


0.38f 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16, 










- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


0.12| 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


17, 










- 


* 


1.12f 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.481 


18, 










- 


1.68J 


- 


0.02f 


- 


- 


- 


* 


* 


- 


- 


- 


19, 










- 


- 


0.11§ 


- 


0.32f 


0.13| 


* 


0.30f 


* 


- 


- 


- 


20, 










0.041 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


* 


o.oet 


- 


- 


21, 










* 


* 


0.15f 


- 


- 


0.43f 


* 


0.04j 


0.52f 


- 


- 


* 


22, 










1.25f 


0.66J 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2. 10f 


- 


- 


0.07f 


0.07f 


1.93|| 


23, 
24 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.68f 


- 


- 


0.08f 


- 


- 


25, . 










- 


* 


- 


- 


0.15t 


- 


- 


0.25f 


- 


- 


- 


* 


26, 










* 


* 


- 


- 


0.45f 


0.41| 


- 


- 


* 


- 


* 


0.57J 


27, 










0.56§ 


0.56f 


- 


0.25f 


- 


- 


0.07f 


- 


* 


- 


0.43f 


0.041 


28, 










- 


1.45f 


* 


- 


0.35f 


- 


- 


- 


* 


3.00| 


- 


- 


29, 










- 


- 


0.97| 


* 


- 


0.14f 


- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


0.30§ 


30, 










0.03| 


- 


- 


1.53f 


0.07f 


- 


- 


1.75| 


2.00f 


- 


0.13f 


- 


31, 










- 


- 


0.031 


- 


- 


O.llf 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


otals 


• 


2.96 


5.01 


5.36 


4.01 


1.60 


2.44 


3.96 


5.50 


4.18 


6.76 


0.95 


7.21 



Total for the year, 49.94 inches. 

* Rainfall included in that of following day. f Rain. J Snow. 

§ Rain and enow. || Rain, enow and hail. 



2S2 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 


3.- 


- Mai 


nfall 


in Inches at Framingham, 


Mass., in 


1902. 


DAY OF MONTH. 


>> 

u 

a 

2 

a 


>> 

u 

85 


a 
u 

a 

2 


< 


>> 

as 


6 

a 

P 




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3 

P 
< 


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5 

B 

n 
Pi 
CD 


u 

s 
.a 
o 
o 

O 


u 

a 

• 
> 

o 
55 


V 

a 

V 

5 

5 
Q 


1, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.03} 


- 


0.04} 


0.40} 


- 


- 


2, 










* 


0.84§ 


0.42f 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


3, 










0.14§ 


- 


- 


- 


0.07} 


0.08} 


0.19} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.49} 


4, 










- 


0.01} 


- 


- 


0.12} 


0.01} 


- 


0.82} 


0.21} 


- 


0.02} 


- 


5, 










- 


- 


1.45} 


- 


- 


0.04} 


0.05} 


- 




* 


- 


0.65} 


6, . 










- 


- 


- 


0.04} 


0.10} 


- 


0.05} 


0.32} 


- 


0.62} 


0.04} 


- 


7 . 










0.11} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.10} 


- 


- 


0.71} 


- 


- 


0.15} 


8, 










- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


0.18} 


0.15} 


0.49} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9, . 










- 


- 


1.24} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.67} 


- 






10, 










0.02} 


- 


- 


2.12} 


- 


0.06} 


0.35} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11, 










* 


- 


- 


0.03} 


- 


- 


- 


1.99} 


- 


* 


- 


* 


12, . 










0.45 J 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.31} 


0.13} 


0.16} 


13, 










- 


0.01} 


* 


- 


0.04} 


0.51} 


- 


- 


0.84} 


- 


0.04} 


* 


14, . 










- 


- 


0.25} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.38}: 


15, . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


0.04} 


0.17} 


0.64} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


16, . 




\ 






- 


- 


1.19} 


- 


- 


0.06} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.08§ 


17, 










- 


1.88} 


0.12} 


- 


- 


- 


0.02} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18, 










0.03} 


- 


- 


0.01} 


- 


- 




- 


* 


0.02} 


- 


- 


19, . 










- 


- 


0.14§ 


- 


0.30} 


0.25} 


* 


0.26} 


* i 


- 


- 


- 


20, 










- 


- 


* 


- 


- 


- 


* 


- 


0.65} 


- 


- 


- 


21, • 










* 


- 


0.16} 


0.01} 


- 


0.46} 


1.08} 


0.03} 


- 


- 


- 


* 


22, . 


«. 








1.51f 


0.89} 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.19} 


- 


- 


- 


0.02} 


1.68} 


23, 










- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.13} 


- 


- 


24, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.02} 


- 


- 


25, 










- 


- 


- 


0.13t 


0.10} 


- 


- 


o.o3r 


0.08} 


- 


* 


0.86} 


26, 










* 


1.47f 


- 


0.46} 


0.03} 


0.30} 


- 


0.13} 


* 


- 


* 


0.01} 


27, 










0.43§ 


- 


0.02} 


- 


0.99} 


- 


0.02} 


- 


0.39} 


* 


0.84} 


- 


28, 










- 


1.55} 


* 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


* 


1.70} 


- 


- 


29, 










- 


- 


1.42} 


- 


- 


0.09} 


0.20} 


- 


* 


- 


- 


0.15} 


30, 










0.01 J 


- 


0.04} 


1.82} 


- 


0.11} 


- 


- 


0.751 


- 


0.27§ 


- 


31, 










0.01§ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


otale 


, 


2.71 


6.65 | 6.45 


4.62 


1.79 


2.42 


2.97 


4.07 


4.34 


4.20 


1.36 


6.61 



* Rainfall included in that of following day 
§ Rain and snow. 



Total for the year, 48.19 inches. 

} Rain. 



} Snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 



283 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1902. 



DATE. 


<4» 

a 
s 
o 


O • 

a 


Duration. 


DATE. 


□ 
S 
O 




Duration. 




8 


§« 








a 


g« 






< 


CQ 








< 


QQ 




Jan. 3, 


0.02 


Snow. 


6 00 a.m. to 


7.50 a.m. 


June 3, 


0.19 


Rain. 


5.30 P.M. to 9.30 p.m. 


Jan. 7, 


0.47 


Snow. 


1.15 P.M. tO 


9.30 P.M. 


June 7, 


0.05 


Rain. 


1.30 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. 


Jan. 10, 


0.02 


Snow. 


8.30 A.M. to 


1.15 P M. 


June 8, 


0.26 


Rain. 


12.30 p.m. to 2.00 P.M. 


Jan. 11, 


I 0.58 


Snow. 


6.00 p.m. to 




June 10, 


0.10 


Rain. 


4.00 p.m. to 6.30 p.m. 


Jan. 12, 




11.00 a.m. 


June 13, 


0.36 


Rain. 


8.10 A.M. to 10.00 A.M. 


Jan. 21, 


0.70 


Rain. 


11.30 P.M. to 




June 15, 


0.29 


Rain. 


5.30 A.M. to 9.00 P.M. 


Jan. 22, 




5.00 p.m. 


June 16, 


J 0.05 


Rain. 


4.05 P.M. to 


Jan. 26, 


0.17 


Snow and 


4.30 p.m. to 




June 17, 


12.30 A.M. 


Jan. 27, 


rain. 




7.00 A.M. 


June 19, 


0.85 


Rain. 


12.50 P.M. to 6.00 P.M. 


Jan. 30, 


0.02 


Snow. 


6.30 A.M. to 11.00 A.M. 


June21, 
June 22, 
June 26, 


J 0.53 


Rain. 


8.30 A.M. to 

3.00 A.M. 
4.00 A.M. to 10.15 A.M. 


Total, 


1.98 








0.39 


Rain. 












June 29, 
June 30, 


0.09 
J0.08 


Rain. 
Rain. 


11.00 A.M. to 7.30 P.M. 












5.30 p.m. to 


Feb. 1, 
Feb. 2, 


{ 1.11 


Snow and 


6.30 A.M. to 




July 1, 


6.45 A.M. 


) 


rain. 




10.30 p.m. 










Feb. 4, 


0.04 


Rain. 


5.30 p.m. to 


7.00 P.M. 


Total, 


2.74 






Feb. 12, 


0.02 
0.02 


Snow. 
Snow. 


2.00 A.M. to 5.30 A.M. 
7.00 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. 










Feb. 12, 










Feb. 17, 


J 2.16 


Snow. 


6.45 A.M. to 




July 1, 


0.03 


Rain. 


9.30 a.m. to 1.30 p.m. 


Feb. 18, 




9.15 A.M. 


July 3, 


0.38 


Rain. 


9.00 A.M. to 6.20 P.M. 


Feb. 21, 


0.77 


Snow. 


2.00 p.m. to 




July 6, 


0.05 


Showers. 


During day. 


Feb. 22, 




3.30 P.M. 


July 8, 


0.07 


Rain. 


8.00 a.m. to 10.30 A.M. 


Feb. 25, 
Feb. 26, 


1.51 


Rain. 


7.30 p.m. to 


10.30 p.m. 


July 9, 
July 10, 


J 0.40 


Rain. 


11.40 p.m. to 

10.50 A.M. 


Feb. 28, 


2.13 


Rain. 


7.00p.M.tol2.( 


July 15, 


0.45 


Rain. 


5.00 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. 












July 17, 


0.53 


Rain. 


4.30 P.M. to 5.15 P.M. 






Total, 


7.76 








July 19, 
July 20, 
July 21, 


J 1.41 


Rain. 


6.15 A.M. 

to 












7 00 A.M. 


Mar. 2, 


0.21 


Rain. 


9.00 a.m. to 


3.30 P.M. 


July 21, 


0.06 


Rain. 


8.30 P.M. to 9.30 P.M. 


Mar. 5, 


i 


Snow. 


11.00 a.m. to 




July 22, 


0.10 


Rain. 


6.10 P.M. to 8.00 P.M. 


Mar. 6, 
Mar. 8, 
Mar. 9, 


> 1.71 




4.30 A.M. 


July 27, 


0.04 


Rain. 


1.30 P.M. to 3.30 P.M. 


J 0.74 


Rain. 


12.00 midnight 

to 7.30 p.m. 


Total, 


3.52 






Mar. 13, 


0.28 


Rain. 


4.00 p.m. to 


2.30 A.M. 










Mar. 14, 










Mar. 16, 
Mar. 17, 


0.81 


Rain. 


8.00 p.m. to 


6.15 A.M. 


Aug. 4, 
Aug. 6, 


0.17 
0.45 


Rain. 
Rain. 


4.40 P.M. to 5.25 P.M. 
7.30 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 


Mar. 17, 


0.11 


Rain. 


10.00 a.m. to 


1.30 p.m. 


Aug. 7, 


0.01 


Rain. 


8.30 A.M. to 3.45 A.M. 


Mar. 19, 


0.11 


Snow and 


6.30 a.m. to 


9.30 P.M. 


Aug. 8, 


0.14 


Rain. 


6.45 A.M. to 8.30 a.m. 






rain. 






Aug. 11, 


0.19 


Rain. 


4.30 A.M. to 7.00 A.M. 


Mar. 20, 
Mar. 21, 


(o.l3 


Rain. 


1.30 p.m. to 


6.00 A.M. 


Aug. 11, 
Aug. 11, 


0.84 
0.35 


Rain . 
Rain. 


10.30 A.M. to 2.30 P.M. 
8.00 P.M. to 10.00 P.M. 


Mar. 28, 
Mar. 29, 


f 1.15 


Rain. 


5.30 p.m. to 


2.00 P.M. 


Aug. 18, 
Aug. 19, 


{ 0.44 


Rain. 


9.00 P.M. to 

2.30 P.M. 


Mar. 31, 


0.02 


Rain. 


2.00 a.m. to 


4.00 A.M. 


Aug. 21, 
Aug. 22, 
Aug. 23, 


0.03 

J 0.13 


Rain. 
Rain. 


2.55 P.M. to 3.10 P.M. 
5.00 P.M. to 

5.00 A.M. 


Total, 


5.27 












Aug. 25, 
Aug. 25. 


0.08 
0.13 


Rain. 
Rain. 


2.13 P.M. to 2.40 p.m. 


Apr. 8, 
Apr. 9, 






2.00 p.m. to 




5.45 P.M. to 8.15 P.M. 


J2.37 


Rain. 


2.00 P.M. 


Total, 


2.96 






Apr. 26, 


0.46 
0.85 


Rain. 
Rain. 


1.15 A.M. tO 
2.00 A.M. to 


8.30 P.M. 
2.00 P.M. 










Apr. 30, 










Apr. 30, 


j 0.29 


Rain. 


11.15 A.M. tO 




Sept. 2, 


0.08 


Rain. 


8.00 A.M. to 4.00 A.M. 


May 1, 




2.30 A.M. 


Sept. 4, 


0.60 


Rain. 


3.55 A.M. to 9.30 A.M. 












Sept. 4, 


0.08 


Rain. 


2.45 P.M. to 3.15 P.M. 






Total, 


3.97 








Sept. 7, 
Sept. 9, 
Sept. 10, 


0.21 
J 0.31 


Rain. 
Rain. 


9.20 A.M. to 3.00 P.M. 
4.00 P.M. to 4 












12 20 A.M. 


May 4, 


i 


Rain. 


4.00 p.m. to 




Sept. 13, 


0.46 


Rain. 


12.15 P.M. to 5.30 P.M. 


May 5, 


| 0.22 




4.30 A.M. 


Sept. 19, 


0.56 


Rain. 


12.30 A.M. to 2.45 P.M. 


May 7, 


0.07 


Rain. 


2.00 A.M. tO 


4.30 A.M. 


Sept. 27, 


I 0.42 


Rain. 


4.00 A.M. to 


May 13, 


0.07 


Rain. 


4.30 A.M. to 


7.30 a.m. 


Sept. 28, 






4.30 A.M. 


May 19, 


0.44 


Rain. 


10.30 A.M. to 11.00 P.M. 


Sept. 28, 


l 0.39 


Rain. 


9.30 P.M. to 


May 25, 


0.04 


Rain. 


7.00 P.M. to 10.15 P.M. 


Sept. 29, 






6.30 A.M. 


May 27, 


0.27 


Rain. 


2 25 p.m. to 11.00 p.m. 


Sept 30, 
Oct. 1, 


0.20 


Rain. 


4.30 A.M. to 

7.00 A.M. 


Total, 


1.11 


















Total, 


3.31 







284 



METROPOLITAN AVATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1902 

— Concluded. 



DATE. 


a 
s 
o 



< 


DQ 


Duration. 


DATE. 


a 
p 
o 

a 
< 


(4 

£•3 
a** 

m 


Duration. 


Oct. 1, 
Oct. 5, 
Oct. 6, 
Oct. 11, 
Oct. 12, 
Oct. 22, 
Oct. 23, 
Oct. 28, 
Oct. 28, 


0.43 

J 0.78 

1.24 

0.28 

1.33 
0.58 


Rain. 
Raio. 

Rain. 

Rain. 

Rain. 
Rain. 


7.00 a.m. to 10.00 p m. 
2.20 p.m. to 

4.40 a.m. 
5.30 P.M.to 

2.30 p.m. 
11.10 p.m. to 

11.45 a.m. 

12.15 a.m. to 7.15 a.m. 

8.30 a.m. to 11.45 a.m. 


Dec. 3, 
Dec. 5, 
Dec. 7, 
Dec. 10, 
Dec. 11, 
Dec. 12, 
Dec. 13, 
Dec. 14, 
Dec. 16, 
Dec. 17, 
Dec. 20, 
Dec. 21, 
Dec. 25, 
Dec. 26, 
Dec. 27, 
Dec. 29, 
Dec. 30, 

Total, 


0.52 
0.39 
0.19 
0.03 

j 0.10 

J 0.60 

1.07 

j 1.52 

0.82 

0.05 

j 0.14 


Rain. 
Snow. 
Snow. 
Snow. 

8now. 

Snow. 

Snow and 
rain. 
Rain. 

Snow. 
Snow. 
Rain. 


1.15 a.m. to 3.30 P.M. 
2.30 a.m. to 4.00 p.m. 
9 30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 
9.00 a.m. to 2.30 p.m. 
6.45 P M. to 

7.10 A.M. 

1.30 a.m. to 

8.00 A.M. 
5.00 A.M. to 

5 30 A.M. 
11.10 a.m. to 

5.15 A.M. 


Total, 


4.64 


Nov. 11, 
Nov. 12, 
Nov. 13, 
Nov. 22, 
Nov. 26, 
Nov. 27, 
Nov. 30, 
Dec. 1, 


j 0.12 

0.04 
0.03 

j 1.03 

0.34 


Rain. 

Mist. 
Rain. 

Rain. 
Rain. 


8.50 p.m. to 

6.45 a.m. 
During day. 
8.00 P M. to 9.00 p.m. 
3.00 A.M. to 

11.30 p.m. 
7.50 P.M. to 

3.30 A. M 


11.30 A.M. to 

4.30 a.m. 
4.30 a.m. to 6.00 a.m. 
4.30 p.m. to 

2.30 a.m. 


5.43 




Total, 


1.56 





Total for the year, 44.25 inches. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



293 



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294 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aque- 
ducts in 1902, by Months. 





• 

Wachusett 
Aqueduct 
(Gallons;. 


Sudbury Aqueduct. 




MONTHS. 


From 

Framingham 

Reservoir 

No. 3 
(Gallons). 


. i 

From 
Framingham 

Reservoirs 
Nos. 1 and 2 

(Gallons). 


Total 
(Gallons). 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct 
(Gallons). 


January, 


117,171,000 


105,584,000 


- 


105,584,000 


3,635,000 


February, 


87,850,000 


104,754,000 


- 


104,754,000 


1,807,000 


March, . 


30,877,000 


100,106,000 


- 


100,106,000 


12,910,000 


April, . 


84,917,000 


89,753,000 


- 


89,753,000 


11,783,000 


May, . 


92,032,000 


97,045,000 


5,761,000 


102,806,000 


5,458,000 


June, . 


55,387,000 


91,430,000 


11,343,000 


102,773,000 


5,726,000 


July, . 


35,584,000 


63,874,000 


21,394,000 


85,268,000 


22,590,000 


August, 


34,964,000 


55,248,000 


25,113,000 


80,361,000 


23,558,000 


September, . 


28,383,000 


61,430,000 


25,120,000 


86,550,000 


20,883,000 


October, 


76,187,000 


63,545,000 


28,836,000 


90,381,000 


15,468,000 


November, . 


74,217,000 


85,883,000 


7,497,000 


93,380,000 


9,207,000 


December, . 


78,274,000 


106,580,000 


- 


106,580,000 


11,916,000 


Averages, 


66,205,000 


85,314,000 


10,331,000 


95,645,000 


12,165,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



295 



£ 



«. 



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•to 



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epunod-joojj ui &in(j 


72,550,000 
72,180,000 
72,540,000 
77,340,000 
74,880,000 
76,410,000 
75,830,000 

76,170,000 


o 
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69,130,000 
69,480,000 
74,070,000 
71,720,000 
73,180,000 
72,630,000 

72,950,000 


o 
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to 

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"(139.3) WI a§BJ9AY 


105.48 

120.09 
119.03 
118.67 
120.00 
120.80 
121.02 
120.28 

120.44 


o 

C5 

o> 


•(saoii^F)) 8ai 
-jqSi'I jo SaijBSfj 
joj uoiionpaci oa 
'l^of) jo panoj jod 
pad rand Ajpacno 


694.66 
697.20 
702.82 
740.98 
712.71 
725.92 
724.94 

727.08 


o 

o 

o 
o« 


•sjaijnTif) pae 
saqsy jo "Juoq jaj 


8.6 
10.8 
10.3 
11.4 
12.0 
10.7 
10.5 

10.9 
10.2 


•(epanoj) ejagaiJO 
pac saqa y jo jnnoray 


8,857 
1,012 
6,505 
4,446 
704 
2,334 
5,576 

9,209 


CO 

-f 

CO 

co" 

CO 


•(BpanOjj) parans 
-uod \@oq jo lunoray 


103,446 
9,366 
63,032 
39,070 
5,879 
21,848 
53,232 

84,544 


■<* 
o" 

CO 
CO 


•(8nou«o uoiniR) 
dijS J0 J paAvoi 
■\v -jnao jaa SS'fr 
'padmncl ^u no ray 


2.15 

71.86 
6.53 
44.30 
28.95 
4.19 
15.86 
38.59 

61.47 


o 
o 

CO 

0* 


•araixSaidranjiBjox 


Hrs. Min. 
5 30 

168 40 
14 25 

105 45 

68 30 

9 25 

34 20 

88 00 

135 40 


CO 

to 


MONTHS. 














►r E» . • . E - S ® 
8 3 « M - . . g | M § s 


<v 
bo 

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u 

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> 

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c 

3) 

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296 



METROPOLITAN >VATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



^ 



QQ 



S 



« 



«53 

6 



S 






^ 



3 



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CM 



SaijqSn 
jo Saiieajj joj aoi; 
-onpad oa 'jasra 
-ao«idsiQ ja§anij 
jo sie«g ao *i bo O 
jo spanoj 001 -^d 
spanod-joo.j aj^jnQ 


118,620,000 
101,820,000 
130,310,000 
127,400,000 

118,5^)0,000 


o 
» 

©" 

© 

©* 

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•dilS 
joj p8Avon*3 'jaso 
J3J 80*8 'SaijqSiT 
jo 3a|j«ag joj 
aoijonpaQ oa '[ B0 
jo spanoj 001 J^d 

spanod-joo^ ai^nQ 

* 


114,930,000 

98,740,000 

126,370,000 

123,550,000 

114,900,000 


© 
o 
©_ 
cT 
o 
©_ 


* (1^.1) WT 328J9AV 


125.90 
126.67 
118.86 
123.67 

122.76 


© 
I— 

eo 

CM 


•(saonB-o) Sai 
-iq§VT jo SaiiBajj 
joj aoponpaQ oa 
'l^OD jo panoj jad 
padrand ^ijaBtiQ 


1,095.85 

935.75 

1,276.35 

1,199.30 

1,124.24 


00 

© 
in 

CO 

!-* 


•sja^ajjo pae 
eaqsv jo '\udj jaj 


10.0 
11.0 
10.8 

10.7 

10.9 


© 

1-1 


•(spanoj) eje^aiiQ 
puB saqs y jo lanora y 


23,492 

491 

8,087 

1,867 

11,999 


c 

CO 

■«" 

•* 


O t- iO <— i l- 

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CO 
CO 


•(saonBoaotinK) 
dijg joj pa.ii.oi 
-pe -jaso J8J 20*8 
'padamd jaaocny 


258.31 

4.18 

95.86 

20.93 

124.11 


— . 

CO 
CO 

© 
2 


•araixsaidran^iBiox 


lira. MIn. 

261 55 

4 10 

94 30 

22 00 

123 30 
506 05 


MONTllti. 
















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No. 57.1 



AND SEWERAGE BOAKD. 



297 




298 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 19. — Average Daily Consumption of Water during the Year 
1902, in the Cities and Towns supplied tvholly or in Part by the Met- 
ropolitan Water Works, including Boston, Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, 
Everett, Quincy, Medford, Melrose, Revere, Watertown, Arlington, 
Milton, Stoneham, Winthrop, Swampscott, Belmont, Nahant and a 
Small Portion of Saugus. (For Consumption of Water in Whole Met- 
ropolitan Water District see Table JSTo. 23.) 





Supplied by 


Supplied 






Consump- 
tion per 
Inhabitant 
(Gallons). 


MONTHS. 


Metropolitan 

Works 

(Million 

Gallons). 


from Local 
Sources 
(Million 

Gallons) .* 


Total 
(Million 
Gallons). 


Estimated 
Population. 


January, 


115.088 


.603 


115.691 


864,000 


134 


February, 












114.177 


.276 


114.453 


865,900 


132 


March, . 












105.532 


.009 


105.541 


867,700 


122 


April, . 












100.280 


.018 


100.298 


869,500 


115 


May, 












103.398 


.026 


103.424 


871,400 


119 


June, 












106.468 


.028 


106.496 


873,300 


122 


July, 












105.041 


.021 


105.062 


875,100 


120 


August, . 












103.815 


.014 


103.829 


877,000 


118 


September, 












104.560 


- 


104.560 


878,800 


119 


October, . 












103.564 


- 


103.564 


880.700 


118 


November, 












102.198 


- 


102; 198 


882,600 


116 


December, 












122.288 


- 


122.288 
107.268 


884,400 


138 


For the ye 


ar, 








• 


107.186 


.082 


874,200 


123 



* The entire town of Milton was supplied by the Hyde Park Water Company until February 28 and 
a portion of the town until August 22. A portion of the supply of the city of Medford was taken from 
Wright's Pond from January 4 to 22. 



Table No. 20. — Average Daily Consumption of Water from the Low 

Service (1902). ' 











Southern 
Low Service 

of Boston 
excluding East 
Boston and 
Charlestown 
(Million Gal- 
lons). 


Somerville, Chelsea, Everett, 

Malden, Medford, Charlestown, East 

Boston, Melrose and Arlington. 


Total 
Low-service 
Consump- 
tion 
(Million 
Gallons). 


MONTHS. 


Supplied 
from Metro- 
politan 
Sources 
(Million 
Gallons). 


Gravity Sup- 
ply to Medford 
from Wright's 
Pond (Million 
Gallons). 


Total Northern 

Low-service 

Consumption 

(Million Gal- j 

Ions). 


January, . 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, . 

June, 

July,. 

August, . 

September 

October, . 

November 

December, 








47.411 
46.756 
42.002 
40.013 
40.834 
40.764 
40.860 
40.573 
39.798 
41.087 
40.387 
49.276 


30.248 
29.697 
26.600 
22.994 
23.883 
25.357 
25.167 
24.820 
26.199 
25.194 
25.722 
32.971 


.317 


30.565 
29.697 
26.600 
22.994 
23.883 
25.357 
25.167 
24.820 
26.199 
25.194 
25.722 
32.971 


77.976 
76.453 
68.602 
63.007 
64.717 
66.121 
66.027 
65.393 
65.997 
66.281 
66.109 
82.247 


For th 


2 yea 


r, 


• 


42.469 


26.562 


.027 


26.589 


69.058 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



301 



Table No. 21. — Average Daily Consumption of Water, in Million Gal- 
lons, from the Southern High-service and the Southern Extra High- 
service Works, supplying Quincy, Watertown, Belmont, Milton and 
the Higher Portions of Boston (1902). 







Southern High Service. 


Southern Extra High 8ervice. 


MONTHS. 


Pumped at 

Chestnut Hill 

High-service 

Btation.* 


Pumped by 
Hyde Park 

Water 

Company 

for 

Milton. 


Totals. 


Pumped at 
Chestnut Hill 
High service 

.Station 

and again at 

West 

Roxbury. 


Pumped by 
Hyde Park 

Water 
Company 

for 
MiltoD. 


Totals. 


January, . 
February, . 
March, 
April, 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
Decern ber, 




28.678 
28.854 
28.214 
28.735 
29.290 
30.270 
29.592 
29.578 
30.232 
29.694 
28.965 
31.845 


.270t 

.261t 


28.948 
29.115 
2S.214 
28.735 
29.290 
30.270 
29.592 
29.578 
30.232 
29.694 
28.965 
31.845 


.275 
.265 
.266 
.278 
.353 
.399 
.363 
.374 
.409 
.406 
.439 
.388 


.0161 

.015f 

.009 

.018 

.026 

.028 

.021 

.014 


.291 
.280 
.275 
.296 
.379 
.427 
.384 
.388 
.409 
.406 
.439 
.3S8 


For the yeai 




29.500 


.043 


29.543 


.352 .012 


.364 



* All except a small portion of Milton supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works after February 
28, and the entire town since August 22. 

t The proportion used by the high-service and extra high-service districts in Milton during Janu- 
ary and February has been estimated. 

Table No. 22. — Average Daily Consumption of Water, in Million Gal- 
lons, from the Northern High Service, supplying Revere, Winthrop, 
Sioampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the Higher Portions of 
Breed's Island, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose and 
Somerville and from the Northern Extra High Service supplying the 
Higher Portion of Arlington (1902). 



MONTHS. 


Northern 

High Service. 

Pumped at 

Spot Pond 

Station. 


Northern 
Extra High 

Service. 
Pumped at 
Arlington Sta- 
tion. 


January, 

February, 

March, . 

April, . 

May, 

June, 

July, . 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 
























8.215 
8.350 
8.201 
7.995 
8.716 
9.273 
8.689 
8.146 
7.569 
6.845 
6.442 
7.552 


.261 
.255 
.249 
.265 
.322 
.405 
.370 
.324 
.353 
.338 
.243 
.256 


For the y 
























7.999 


.304* 



* In addition to the above, 4,320,000 gallons of water, equivalent to 11,000 gallons per day, were sup- 
plied to the town of Lexington from this service. 



302 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 23. — Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict as constituted December 31, 1902, the Towns of Milton and 
Sicampscott and a Small Portion of Saugus, 1893-1902. 

[Gallons per Day.] 



MONTHS. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


January, 


! 75,113,000 


67,409,000 


68,829,000 


82,817,000 


85,269,000 


February, . 










1 71,757,000 


68,801,000 


80,232,000 


86,883,000 


83,824,000 


March, 










' 67,509,000 


62,581,000 


69,414,000 


85,982,000 


82,590,000 


April, . 










! 62,142,000 


57,549,000 


62,742,000 


77,363,000 


79,747,000 


May, . 










' 60,864,000 


60,483,000 


65,000,000 


73,209,000 


76,579,000 


June, . 










; 63,174,000 


68,129,000 


69,705,000 


77,405,000 


77,718,000 


July, . 










; 69,104,000 


73,399,000 


69,422,000 


79,752,000 


85,267,000 


August, 










66,758,000 


67,770,000 


72,007,000 


78,311,000 


83,872,000 


September, 










64,454,000 


66,937,000 


73,490,000 


73,960,000 


84,063,000 


October, 










63,577,000 


62,541,000 


66,834,000 


71,569,000 


79,358,000 


November, . 










i 61,037,000 


62,064,000 


64,714,000 


71,766,000 


72,595,000 


December, . 








66,571,000 


64,979,000 


70,314,000 


79,320,000 


76,465,000 


Averages for the year, 


65,994,000 


65,208,000 


69,322,000 


78,181,000 


80,609,000 


Population 




719,775 


739,917 


760,059 


782,821 


805,582 


Consumption per inhabitant, . 


91.7 


88.1 


91.2 


99.9 


100.1 



MONTHS. 



1898. 



1899. 



1900. 



1901. 



1902. 



January, . . ." . . . . 83,751,000 I 96,313,000 

February, 87,332,000 \ 103,311,000 

March j 85,306,000 ! 90,039,000 

April j 76,407,000 j 86,325,000 

May 76,483,000 ! 89,254,000 

June 83,263,000 97,457,000 

July, 87,995,000 96,584,000 

August : 87,300,000 ! 91,814,000 

September, . . . . . 88,063,000 91,245,000 

October 81,576,000 89,387,000 

November 78,011,000 86,552,000 

December, 86,194,000 85,678,000 



99,926,000 

98,802,000 

97,591,000 

89,297,000 

87,586,000 

98,348,000 

107,545,000 

102,459,000 

103,379,000 

98,165,000 

93,482,000 

97,683,000 



111,146,000 

117,318,000 

105,348,000 

93,117,000 

95,374,000 

103,186,000 

102,557,000 

102,557,000 

j 101,869,000 

! 103,195,000 

101,158,000 

• 113,106,000 



Averages for the year, 
Population, 
Consumption per inhabitant, 



83,464,000 
828,344 
100.8 



91,921,000 
851,105 
108.0 



97,866,000 
873,867 
112.0 



104,449,000 
897,700 
116.4 



118,273,000 
117,089,000 
108,300,000 
102,953,000 
106,499,000 
109,768,000 
108,082,000 
106,787,000 
107,519,000 
106,367,000 
105,008,000 
125,272,000 



110,145,000 
921,600 
119.5 



This table includes the water consumed in the cities and towns enumerated in Table No. 19, together 
with the water consumed in Newton and Hyde Park, which are included in the Metropolitan Water 
District but have not been supplied from the Metropolitan Works. 

Note relating to Chemical Examinations of Water, Tables Nos. 24-30. 

The chemical examinations contained in the tables were made by the 
State Board of Health. Colors have been determined by the Nessler 
standard, but the corresponding values by the platinum standard are also 
given, for the purpose of comparison with colors determined in the labora- 
tory of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, as given in subsequent 
tables. The odor recorded is taken in such a way that it is a much stronger 
odor than would be noticed in samples drawn directly from a tap or collected 
directly from a reservoir. In nearly all cases the samples are collected and 
examined monthly ; in the case of the Sudbury Reservoir, however, they 
are made weekly. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



303 



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METROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



309 



Table No. 30. 



Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in 
Boston, from 1888 to 1902. 

[Parte per 100,000.] 







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Residue on 
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.0183 


.0002 


- 


- 


1889, 




.51 


.46 


4.71 


1.43 


.0005 


.0199 


.0176 


.0023 


.42 


.0272 


.0002 


- 


- 


1890, 




.35 


.36 


4.70 


1.25 


.0003 


.0169 


.0148 


.0021 


.42 


.0241 


.0001 


- 


2.2 


1891, 




.37 


.38 


4.39 


1.63 


.0005 


.0161 


.0136 


.0025 


.37 


.0227 


.0001 


- 


1.7 


1892, 




.37 


.37 


4.70 


1.67 


.0007 


.0168 


.0138' 


.0030 


.41 


.0210 


.0001 


- 


1.9 


1893, 




.61 


.53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0027 


.38 


.0143 


.0001 


.60 


1.8 


1894, 




.69 


.58 


4.64 


1.83 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0019 


.41 


.0106 


.0001 


.63 


1.7 


1895, 




.72 


.59 


4.90 


2.02 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0022 


.40 


.0171 


.0001 


.69 


0.7 


1896, 




.49 


.45 


4.29 


1.67 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0023 


.37 


.0155 


.0001 


.56 


1.4 


1897, 




.65 


.55 


4.82 


1.84 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


.0137 


.0001 


.64 


1.6 


1898, 




.41 


.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.0097 


.0001 


.44 


1.4 


1899, . 




.23 


.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.0137 


.0001 


.35 


1.1 


1900, 




.24 


.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.0076 


.0001 


.38 


1.3 


1901, . 




.24 


.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.0173 


.0001 


.42 


1.7 


1902, . 




.26 


.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.0092 


.0000 


.40 


1.3 



Table No. 31. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metrojjolitan 
Water Works, 1902. {Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[Platinum standard.] 















Nashua 
River. 


Sudbury Reservoir. 


Framingham 
Reservoir No. 3. 


Whitehall 
Reservoir. 


MONTHS. 


Surface. 


03 

— 

a 

0D 


a 


B 



44 

o 

- 


a 

O a 
«-> a 

O ej 


a 

03 

<t-r 

h 
3 

OQ 


a 

V 

■6 


S 

o 

4* 

o 
PQ 


o 

03 

s 
0Q 


January 


0.40 


0.45 


0.42 


0.41 


0.50 


0.40 


0.39 


0.40 


0.53 


February, 












0.31 


0.40 


0.39 


0.40 


0.32 


0.40 


0.40 


0.40 


0.58 


March, 












0.44 


0.22 


0.32 


0.33 


0.68 


0.37 


0.37 


0.37 


0.50 


April, 












0.38 


0.30 


0.30 


0.30 


0.59 


0.31 


0.31 


0.31 


0.38 


May, . 












0.44 


0.31 


0.31 


0.31 


0.49 


0.32 


0.32 


0.33 


0.44 


June, 












0.47 


0.32 


0.32 


0.32 


0.46 


0.32 


0.32 


0.33 


0.52 


July, . 












0.45 


0.24 


0.25 


0.26 


0.42 


0.25 


0.26 


0.29 


0.49 


August, 












0.51 


0.20 


0.20 


0.22 


0.50 


0.23 


0.24 


0.25 


0.45 


September, 










0.43 


0.18 


0.19 


0.21 


0.41 


0.20 


0.21 


0.23 


0.42 


October, . 










0.56 


0.20 


0.20 


0.22 


0.58 


0.23 


0.23 


0.22 


0.43 


November, 










0.63 


0.40 


0.40 


0.44 


0.61 


0.35 


0.35 


0.35 


0.47 


December, 










0.46 


0.49 


0.47 


0.46 


0.53 


0.44 


0.44 


0.44 


0.46 


Mean, 




0.46 


0.31 


0.31 


0.32 


0.51 


0.32 


0.32 


0.33 


0.47 



310 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 31 — Continued. 

[Platinum standard.] 









Hopkinton Reservoir. 


Ashland Reservoir. 


Re 


Framingham 
servoir No. 2. 


MONTHS. 


6 
a 

c 

u 
a 

00 


V 
■a 


a 

o 

o 
pq 


i—i 


CD 

o 

es 

•HI 
la 

3 

m 


5. 

o 
•a 

•6 

5 


Bottom . 


25 

s 


Surface. 


a 

0) 

•a 

i 


E 



o 


"3 

M 


January, .... 


0.75 


0.71 


0.72 


1.00 


0.78 


0.71 


0.72 


0.86 


0.67 


0.68 


0.68 


0.66 


February, 






0J0 


0.71 


0.73 


1.31 


0.59 


0.71 


0.71 


0.90 


0.64 


0.64 


0.64 


0.64 


March, 




. 


0.59 


0.61 


0.61 


0.73 


0.63 


0.63 


0.64 


0.68 


0.54 


0.54 


0.54 


0.54 


April, 




. 


0.58 


0.58 


0.58 


1.19 


0.58 


0.58 


0.58 


1.06 


0.64 


0.65 


0.65 


0.71 


May, 




. 


0.59 


0.60 


0.60 


1.89 


0.65 


0.64 


0.63 


1.39 


0.80 


0.80 


0.80 


0.95 


June, 






0.58 


0.58 


0.58 


2.07 


0.65 


0.63 


0.62 


1.63 


0.80 


0.80 


0.80 


0.86 


July, 




. 


0.53 


0.53 


0.53 


1.80 


0.59 


0.59 


0.59 


1.08 


0.65 


0.66 


0.69 


0.53 


August, . 






0.47 


0.48 


0.67 


1.76 


0.51 


0.54 


0.63 


1.16 


0.49 


0.50 


0.55 


0.54 


September, 






0.44 


0.45 


1.26 


1.72 


0.47 


0.49 


0.67 


0.73 


0.46 


0.47 


0.49 


0.57 


October, . 




. 


0.51 


0.51 


1.12 


1.98 


0.54 


0.54 


0-68 


1.23 


0.88 


0.88 


0.88 


1.10 


November, 




. 


0.57 


0.57 


0.57 


1.65 


0.63 


0.63 


0.63 


1.75 


1.09 


1.09 


1.10 


1.21 


December, 






0.38 


0.42 


0.48 


1.30 i 


0.59 
0.60 


0.59 


0.59 


1.31 


0.96 


1.02 


1.05 


0.85 


Mean, 


0.56 


0.56 


0.70 


1.53 


0.60 


0.64 


1.15 


' 0.72 


0.73 


0.74 


0.76 



[Platinum standard.] 




* The colors given in this column represent the combined colors of the water of the four principal 
feeders. The color of each is determined monthly, and due weight is given, in combining the results, 
to the size of the streams. 



No. 57. J 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



311 



Table No. 31 — Concluded. 

[Platinum standard.] 

















Chestnut 


Hill Reservoir. 


Tap at No. 244 
Boylston Street, 
Boston. 




MONTH8. 


9 

o 

OS 

h 

3 

m 


4) 
T3 

i 


a 

o 

o 

OS 


>» 

3 '-n 

X) 3 

3T3 

m 9 

1— 1 


Inlet (Cochit- 
uate Aque- 
duct. 


«*! 

O o 

a 9 

CD CO 

3 3 

H 


Tap at No. 1 A 
burton P 1 a 
Boston. 


January 


_ 


_ 


_ 


0.37 


0.31 


0.36 


0.36 


0.36 


February, . 












- 


- 


- 


0.39 


- 


0.38 


0.38 


0.36 


March, 












- 


- 


- 


0.36 


0.38 


0.33 


0.34 


0.34 


April, . 












0.28 


0.29 


0.29 


0.30 


0.32 


0.29 


0.29 


0.29 


May, . 












0.30 


0.30 


0.29 


0.34 


0.28 


0.31 


0.32 


0.32 


June, . 












0.32 


0.33 


0.32 


0.36 


0.22 


0.34 


0.36 


0.40 


July, . 












0.30 


0.30 


0.41 


0.34 


0.26 


0.31 


0.32 


0.31 


August, 












0.26 


0.27 


0.49 


0.30 


0.22 


0.26 


0.28 


0.28 


September, . 












0.26 


0.26 


0.51 


0.28 


0.23 


0.26 


0.27 


0.27 


October, 












0.29 


0.30 


0.31 


0.36 


0.20 


0.30 


0.31 


0.30 


November, . 












0.35 


0.35 


0.37 


0.39 


0.26 


0.35 


0.36 


0.37 


December, . 












- 


- 


'- 


0.42 
0.35 


0.31 

0.27 


0.39 
0.32 


0.41 


0.42 


Mean, . 


0.30 


0.30 


0.37 


0.33 


0.34 



Table No. 32. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metro- 
politan Water Works, 1902. (Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[The temperatures are taken at the same place and time as the samples for microscopical examination; 
the depth given for each reservoir is the depth from high- water mark where the temperatures are 
taken.] 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 







Sudbury Reservoir 


Framingham Reser- 


Hopkinton Reser- 




Nashua 


(Depth at 


Place op 


voir . 


So. 3 (Depth 


voir 


(Depth at 




River. 


Observation 


at Place of Obser- 


Place 


of Observa- 








54.5 Feet). 


vation 20.5 Feet). 


tion 


54.3 Feet). 


MONTHS. 










a 
















CD 

V 

a 
u 

3 
0Q 


e 

u 

a! 

«M 

3 

00 


A 

9 


a 

o 

o 

02 


o.— < 
O a 

<— Q 

o s 

H 


9 

a 
a 
«t-i 

hi 
3 


X) 
A 

CD 

■a 

■a 

i 


a 

o 

O 

n 


co* 
e 

a 

•M 
hi 

3 
0D 


A 

a. 

9 

-a 


E 
o 

o 

OQ 


January, 


32.8 


33.4 


34.3 


36.1 


31.8 


34.9 


35.2 


35.4 


34.1 


36.0 


36.9 


February, 




32.1 


33.7 


35.2 


37.0 


32.5 


34.5 


35.2 


35.7 


34.6 


37.0 


38.1 


March, . 




37.9 


36.2 


36.7 


37.6 


37.8 


38.4 


38.7 


38.8 


41.6 


41.6 


41.8 


April, . 




48.6 


46.4 


45.6 


45.2 


49.3 


48.4 


4S.3 


48.0 


44.9 


43.5 


42.9 


May, . 




61.0 


58.3 


55.2 


52.7 


59.6 


58.9 


58.5 


57 7 


56.7 


51.7 


48.1 


June, . 




68.1 


67.6 


64.4 


62.5 


68.9 


67.4 


66.7 


66.1 


65.3 


54.6 


50.0 


July, . 




69.9 


70.9 


68.6 


67.6 


70.6 


71.6 


70.3 


69.4 


70.1 


60.9 


51.6 


August, 




71.8 


71.7 


68.8 


66.9 


71.0 


71.2 


70.5 


69.8 


71.4 


65.2 


50.4 


September, 




67.4 


67.4 


66.5 


65.6 


66.4 


67.7 


67.5 


67.5 


67.2 


65.3 


50.2 


October, 




56.0 


58.4 


58.5 


58.6 


55.4 


56.3 


56.8 


57.2 


57.7 


57.7 


52.9 


November, 




45.7 


47.9 


48.0 


48.0 


44.4 


47.2 


47.6 


47.8 | 


46.3 


46.3 


48.0 


December, 




36.2 


35.9 


36.9 


37.6 


34.4 


36.0 


36.7 


37.6 | 


45.0 


44.3 


44.2 


Mean, 


52.3 


52.3 


51.6 


51.3 


51.8 


52.7 


52.7 


52.6 


52.9 


50.8 


, 46.9 



312 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 32 — Concluded. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 




[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 









Spot Pond 
(Depth at Place 
of Observation 

28.0 Feet). 


1 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir 

(Depth at Place op Observation 

26.0 Feet). 


a 
o 

■ 

*>> 

o 

W 

"* o 
CM — 


a 
o 
u 

a 

03 


MONTHS. 














>> 

a . 

.O^-v 


s • 


0> 
03 . 


a 
** 3 




6 

5 

03 


2 


a 

o 
o 


m 

a 

03 


o. 
2 


a 

o 

o 


o> 

~* 3 


u s 
O <g 


*a 03 

<a 3 

B O 

53* 


C3 02 


o o 
es « 

OS 




02 


s 


aa 


02 


S 


Da 


»—i 


>-> 


H 


H 


H 


January, . 


34.4 


35.8 


36.6 








36.0 


39.2 


35.8 


37.2 


38.4 


February, . 






35.5 


37.7 


38.3 


- 


- 


- 


36.2 


- 


35.6 


36.6 


37.1 


March, 






38.0 


40.0 


40.2 


- 


- 


- 


39.0 


39.1 


40.1 


40.0 


40.9 


April, 






47.0 


47.5 


47.5 


- 


- 


- 


47.4 


45.8 


48.1 


48.5 


49.0 


May, . 






58.3 


56.9 


55.5 


57.4 


56.4 


52.8 


57.8 


56.4 


58.8 


58.6 


59.0 


June, . 






65.7 


65.0 


60.5 


65.3 


59.9 


56.2 


65.2 


60.3 


65.8 


65.8 


66.1 


July, . 






69.5 


69.1 


66.9 


69.3 


66.6 


59.3 


68.5 


69.6 


69.5 


68.8 


69.3 


August, 






71.8 


70.8 


68.5 


72.8 


70.4 


60.3 


70.6 


72.0 


71.6 


71.0 


71.4 


September, 






68.0 


67.7 


67.3 


68.5 


67.0 


62.3 


67.8 


67.7 


68.2 


68.0 


68.4 


October, 






61.0 


61.4 


61.4 


57.0 


57.3 


57.2 


58.1 


58.5 


58.3 


59.4 


59.4 


November, 






51.0 


51.1 


51.1 


47.3 


47.0 


46.0 


48.0 


49.7 


48.3 


50.1 


50.4 


December, 






35.0 


36.2 


36.4 


- 


- 


- 


37.9 


37.6 
54.2 


37.1 
53.1 


39.6 


40.1 


Mean, . 






52.9 


53.3 


52.5 ! 

1 


62.5 


60.7 


56.3 


52.7 


53.6 


54.1 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



313 



Table No. 33, 



Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metro- 
politan Water Works, 1902. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 









Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


MONTHS. 


a 
a 

CS 


a 

3 

a 

a 

3 


a 

■ 

9 


a 

p 

a 

CS 


a 

1 
*s 

3 


s 


Maximum. 


a 
a 

"5 
3 


a 
a 

• 


January, . 






52.0 


2.0 


24.5 


55.0 


0.0 


24.2 


56.0 


2.0 


22.5 


February, 






52.5 


8.0 


27.8 


50.0 


0.0 


25.1 


51.5 


7.5 


24.5 


March, 






68.0 


18.0 


43.4 


68.0 


13.0 


43.5 


66.5 


21.0 


40.3 


April, 






77.0 


29.0 


48.3 


80.0 


28.0 


48.4 


81.5 


27.0 


46.5 


May, . 






89.0 


33.0 


58.0 


89.0 


33.0 


58.0 


87.0 


31.0 


56.9 


June, 






92.0 


45.0 


65.6 


92.0 


43.0 


65.1 


88.0 


44.0 


63.9 


July, 






92.0 


48.5 


68.7 


92.0 


47.0 


68.2 


88.0 


48.5 


67.7 


August, . 






89.5 


47.0 


67.8 


87.0 


44.0 


67.0 


87.0 


37.5 


66.2 


September, 






90.5 


39.0 


62.5 


87.0 


36.0 


60.9 


87.0 


38.0 


60.5 


October, . 






75.0 


26.0 


54.2 


78.0 


22.0 


50.8 


72.5 


21.5 


50.6 


November, 






68.0 


23.0 


45.7 


69.0 


19.0 


42.9 


66.5 


24.0 


41.9 


December, 






55.0 


—10.0 


27.4 


54.0 


—14.0 


25.5 


50.5 


—12.0 


24.3 


Averages, . 






49.5 | 


- 


- 


48.3 


- 


- 


47.2 



314 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






CJ> 

so 

e 



§ •«* 

•<!- tO 

SO C4) 



a 



«0 
i"«o 



CO &. 
pP^S 



fc 


'S 3 


CO 


« 


a> 


o 


•(O 


pq 


H 


o> 




5»s 


g 


« 






£ 


<» 


* 


§ 


<->£Q 


^ 


'S 


so 


S 


C?S 


c 



1; |» 

5ȣ 



co 






CO 

6 

< 





m 


© 


o 


CM 


e» 


e» 


CO 


t— 


,_, 


1 


* 


CO 


CO 




o 


CO 


o 


* 


^< 


eo 


i— 






CO 


CI 


CM 




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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



317 



Table No. 37. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants 
in the Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water 
Works. 



CITY OR TOWN. 



Services. 



Meters. 



Fire 
Hydrants. 



Boston, 

Somerville,. 

Maiden, 

Chelsea, 

Quincy, 

Everett, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Revere, 

"Watertown, 

Winthrop, . 

Belmont, . 

Nahant, 

Arlington, . 

Swampscott, 

Stoneham, . 

Milton, 

Totals, . 



89,384 
10,710 
6,700 
6,257 
4,850 
4,670 
4,039 
3,221 
2,261 
1,692 
1,747 
621 
462 
1,700 
1,055 
1,157 
1,078 



141,604 



4,617 

271 

4,245 

113 

152 

49 

124 

95 

28 

1,515 

9 

621 

43 

94 

19 
1,078 



13,073 



7,785 
955 
401 
290 
607 
484 
467 
273 
126 
313 
112 
141 

62 
339 
217 

93 
268 



12,933 



318 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 4. 



Summary of Statistics for the Year 1902. 

The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water District, 
which includes the following cities and towns : — 



cities and towns. 



Population, 

Census of 

1900. 



Estimated 
Population, 
May 1, 1902. 



Boston, 

Somerville 

Chelsea, 

Maiden, 

Newton,* 

Everett, 

Quincy, 

Medford, 

Hyde Park,* 

Melrose 

Revere 

Watertown, 

Arlington, 

Stoneham 

Winlhrop, 

Belmont 

Nahant, 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 

Milton.t 

Swampscott.t 

Saugus.t 



560,892 

61,643 

34,072 

33,664 

33,587 

24,336 

23,899 

18,244 

13,244 

12,962 

10,395 

9,706 

8,603 

6,197 

6,058 

3,929 

1,152 



585,600 

65,600 

35,300 

35,800 

36,300 

26,700 

25,800 

20,100 

13,900 

13,600 

11,900 

10,500 

9,400 

6,300 

6,900 

4,500 

1,200 




* No water supplied to these places during the year from Metropolitan Water Works, 
t Not in the Metropolitan Water District, but have been supplied with water from the Metropolitan 
Water Works. 
X Only a small portion of Saugus is supplied with water. 



No. 57.] 



AXD SEWERAGE BOARD. 



319 



Sources of Supply. 



80URCE 


Area of 

Watershed 

(Square Miles). 


Remarks. 


Sudbury River, 


18.87 

75.20 

118.23 


Original works built in 1848. 
Original works built in 1872-78. 
Works begun in 1895; not finished. 



Mode of Supply. 
Pumping to reservoirs. 

Pumping. 

Chestnut Hill High-service Station : — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard Iron 

Works and E P. Allis Company. 
Description of coal used : Bituminous ; Georges Creek Cumberland and Loyal 

Hanna Sonman Shaft ; anthracite coal screenings. Price per gross ton in bins : 

$4.34 to $8.40 ; screenings, $ 2. 24. Average price per gross ton, $4.85. Per 

cent, ashes, 10.8. 

Chestnut Hill Low-service Station : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used : Bituminous ; Georges Creek Cumberland and Loyal 

Hanna Sonman Shaft. Price per gross ton in bins, f 4. 34 to $8.40. Average 

price per gross ton, $4.95. Per cent, ashes, 9.8. 

Spot Pond Station : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 
Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used : Bituminous ; Georges Creek Cumberland and Loyal 
Hanna Sonman Shaft; anthracite buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins, 
$4.25 to f 6.72. Average price per gross ton, $5.26. Per cent, ashes, 10.5. 



Chestnut Hill High-service 
Station. 



Engine 
No 1. 



Engine 

5o. 3. 



Engine 
No. 4. 



Coal consumed for year (pounds) 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year (million gallons), 

Average dynamic head 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, . 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot, . . . . 



380,417 

$2,547.77 

273.90 

119.99 

720.00 

75,130,000 

$9,302 

.078 



443,134 

$2,344.16 

603.39 

123.70 

1,135.98 

120,700,000 

$4,657 

.038 



8,078,166 

$39,385.36 

10,118.61 

128.43 

1,252.59 

136,010,000 

$3,892 

.030 



320 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Coal consumed for year (pounds) 

CoBt of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year (million gallons), . 

Average dynamic head, 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, .... 
Duty on basis of plunger displacement, 
Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 
Cost per million gallons raised one foot, 



Chestnut Hill 

Low-service 

Station. 



Engines Nos. 
5, 6 and 7. 



8,275,464 

$37,885.33 

27,941.95 

42.48 

3,376.48 

121,340,000 

$1,356 

.032 



Spot Pond 
Station. 



Engine No. 9. 



2,267,456 

$13,162.90 

2,919.01 

123.73 

1,287.35 

134,880,000 

$4,509 

.036 



Consumption. 
Estimated total population of the eighteen cities and towns sup 
plied wholly or partially during the year 1902 (yearly average), 

Total consumption, gallons, 

Furnished from Metropolitan Water Works sources, gallons, 

Furnished from local sources, gallons, 

Average daily consumption, gallons, 

Gallons per day each inhabitant, 

Distribution. 



874,200 

39,152,660,000 

39,122,640,000 

30,020,000 

107,268,000 

122.7 



Owned and 

operated 

by Metropolitan 

Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



Total in District 
supplied 
I by Metropolitan 
I Water Works. 



Kind of pipe used, .... 

Sizes, 

Extension less length abandoned, miles, 
Length in use, miles, .... 

Stop gates added, 

Stop gates now in use, 

Service pipes added, .... 

Service pipes now in use, . 

Meters added 

Meters now in use 

Fire hydrants added, .... 
Fire hydrants now in use, . 



_* 

60 to 6 inch. 

10.09 

82.09 

48 

328 



-t 
60 to 4 inch. 
60.59 
1,457.1 



3,064 

141,604 

2,043 

13,073 

654 

12,933 



* Cast-iron and cement-lined wrought iron. f Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought iron and kalamine. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 321 



Appendix No. 5. 



LEGISLATION OF THE YEAR 1902 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



ACTS. 

[Chapter 13.] 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the south 

metropolitan system of sewage disposal. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding ninety-three thousand six South metro- 

° J politan system 

hundred and sixty-six dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid °^ 8 Be ^ a , ge 
out of the treasury of the Commonwealth from the ordinary 
revenue, for the maintenance and operation of the south metro- 
politan system of sewage disposal, comprising a part of Boston, 
the cities of Newton, Quincy and Waltham, and the towns of 
Brookline, Watertown, Dedham, Hyde Park and Milton, during 
the year ending on the thirty-first day of December, nineteen 
hundred and two. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved January 27, 1902. 



[Chapter 51.] 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the north 

metropolitan system of sewerage. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and three North Metro- 

. . politan Systei 

thousand four hundred dollars is hereby appropriated, to be of sewerage. 
paid out of the treasury of the Commonwealth from the ordinaiy 
revenue, for the maintenance and operation of the system of 
sewage disposal for the cities of Boston, Cambridge, Somer- 
ville, Maiden, Chelsea, Woburn, Medford, Melrose and Everett, 
and the towns of Stoneham, Winchester, Arlington and Bel- 



322 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



moot, known as the North Metropolitan System, during the 
year ending on the thirty-first day of December, nineteen hun- 
dred and two. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved January 31, 1902. 



Description of 
property to be 
recorded, etc. 



[Chapter 101.] 

An Act to fix the time when property shall be deemed 

to be taken for the metropolitan sewerage works. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board, in 
order hereafter to take any property by right of eminent domain 
for the metropolitan sewerage works, shall sign and cause to be 
recorded in the registry of deeds for the county and district in 
which the property to be taken is situated, a statement con- 
taining a description thereof, as certain as is required in a com- 
mon conveyance of land, and stating that the same - is taken for 
the metropolitan sewerage works ; and upon such recording the 
rights, easements and other property described in such state- 
ment shall be .taken for the Commonwealth for the purposes of 
the metropolitan sewerage works. Said board, after it has so 
taken any property under the right of eminent domain, shall 
notify the owner thereof, and upon his request, within three 
years after such taking, shall, within thirty days after such 
request, furnish him with a description in writing of the land or 
other property so taken from him. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 24, 1902. 



[Chapter 189.] 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and sewerage 
board to furnish water to companies owning water pipe 
systems in sections of certain cities and towns. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
The metropoii- Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board may 

tan water and 

sewerage board from time to time f urnish water to any water company which 

may furninh . , ^ . 

water to certain owns the water pipe systems in a section of a city or town, tor the 
supply of such section, although the city or town, or a part of 
the city or town, is within ten miles of the state house, and the 
city or town has not been admitted into the metropolitan water 
district, on payment by the water company of such sum of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 323 

money as the said board may determine : provided, however, Proviso, 
that the sum so determined in any case shall in the opinion of 
the board exceed the proper proportion of the entire assessment 
which would be imposed upon the city or town were it a part of 
the metropolitan district. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 19, 1902. 



[Chapter 307.] 
An Act to supply the town of milton with water. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The town of Milton may supply itself and its Town of Milton 

may supply 

inhabitants with water for the extinguishment of fires and for itself with 
domestic, manufacturing and other purposes ; and may establish 
fountains and hydrants and relocate or discontinue the same, 
and may regulate the use of such water and fix and collect rates 
to be paid for the use of the same. 

Section 14. The metropolitan water and sewerage board Town may be 

1 ° admitted into 

shall on application admit the town of Milton into the metro- the metropoii- 

1 l tan water dis- 

politan water district, and shall furnish water to the town on trict. 
the terms prescribed by chapter four hundred and eighty-eight 
of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five and of 
acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, for the cities 
and towns included in the metropolitan water district, and on 
payment of such sum of money as said board may determine to 
be just. 

Section 16. This act shall be submitted to the qualified Question of 

* acceptance to be 

voters of the town of Milton for their acceptance and shall be submitted to 

r voters. 

void unless such voters, voting at a legal meeting called for that 
purpose in the same manner in which meetings for town elec- 
tions are called, or at any annual town meeting, shall, within 
six months after the passage of this act, determine by ballot by 
a majority vote of Uiose present and voting thereon to accept 
the same. The warrant for notifying such meeting, if called 
specially as aforesaid, shall specify when the polls shall be 
opened for the purpose of voting and when they shall be closed. 

Section 17. So much of this act as authorizes the submis- when to take 

effect. 

sion of the question of its acceptance to the qualified voters of 
said town shall take effect upon its passage, but it shall not 
take further effect until accepted as hereinbefore provided by 



324 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the qualified voters of said town ; and the number of meetings 
called for the purpose of voting upon the question of its accept- 
ance shall not exceed three. [Approved April 17, 1902. 
Accepted by the town of Milton, July 14, 1902. 



[Chapter 351.] 

An Act to authorize the city of Worcester to increase 

its water supply. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 
cuy of worcee- Section 1. The city of Worcester i3 hereby authorized, for 

ter may take J J 

certain waters, the purpose of increasing its water supply, to take by purchase 
or otherwise, from time to time, and to hold and convey into 
and through said city the waters of Kendall brook, so-called, 
at or near the dam of Kendall reservoir, and the waters of 
Asnebumskit brook, so-called, at or near an elevation of eight 
hundred feet above mean sea level at Boston, and the waters 
upon the watershed between said two brooks at or near an eleva- 
tion of eight hundred feet above mean sea level at Boston, all 
of said places of taking being in the town of Holden, and also 
the water in any reservoirs thereon and the waters flowing into 
and from the same, and all springs and tributaries thereto, and 
the water rights connected with said sources above said places 
of taking ; and the said city may take existing reservoirs and 
ponds upon said streams above the points at which it may take 
the said waters ; and may by aqueduct bring the waters so 
taken directly into the city or through any reservoir and any 
aqueduct belonging to said city and now existing ; and may 
construct and lay conduits, pipes and other works under or over 
lands, water courses, railroads, railways, public or private ways 
and along such ways ; and may take by purchase or otherwise 
and hold in fee or otherwise any lands, dams or structures, 
easements or rights in land on and around said Kendall brook 
and reservoir up to an elevation of about eight hundred and 
fifty feet above said mean sea level, and between said Kendall 
reservoir and other reservoirs of said city on Tatnuck brook in 
said Holden, and between said Kendall reservoir and said 
Asnebumskit brook up to an elevation of about nine hundred 
and forty feet above said mean sea level ; and the said city 
may build and maintain dams, conduits, canals, water courses, 
pipes, reservoirs, and such other works as may be deemed 
necessary for collecting, purifying, storing, discharging, con- 
ducting or distributing said waters or preserving the purity 
thereof. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 325 

Section 2. The rights herein granted to the city of Worcester The rights 

J herein granted 

shall be subiect to the rights granted to the Leicester Water £e city of 

** ° D Worcester to be 

Supply District by chapter two hundred and thirty of the acts subject to the 

ri J •' * J rights granted 

of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five, and if said the Leicester 

J ° J Water Supply 

Leicester Water Supply District shall exercise any rights con- District, etc. 
ferred by said chapter after the taking herein authorized to be 
made by the city of Worcester the Leicester Water Supply 
District shall pay to the city of Worcester all damages thereby 
sustained by it, to be ascertained and determined in the manner 
and within the time set forth in chapter three hundred and 
sixty-one of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and seventy- 
one : provided, that from the time when the city of Worcester Proviso. 
first diverts the waters of Asnebumskit brook, until the time 
when an additional source of w r ater supply embracing more 
than twenty-five square miles of watershed is obtained for 
the metropolitan water district, the city of Worcester shall not 
draw water from the sources authorized by this act when water 
is running to waste past the lowest water works dam of said city 
on Tatnuck brook ; nor, in case the amount of water stored in 
the reservoirs on Tatnuck brook exceeds one half the total 
capacity of such reservoirs, shall the city draw water from the 
sources so authorized when water is running to waste past the 
lowest water works dam of said city on either Tatnuck brook 
or Lynde brook ; nor, in case the amount of water stored in 
the reservoirs on Tatnuck brook exceeds three fourths of the 
total capacity of such reservoirs, shall the city draw water from 
the sources so authorized when water is running to waste past 
the lowest water works dam of said city on either Tatnuck 
brook or Lynde brook or Kettle brook, except that the fact of 
a waste of water past the Kettle brook dam shall not prevent 
the drawing of water as aforesaid, if the flow of Kettle brook at 
the head of the conduit or conduits which convey its water 
toward the Lynde brook reservoir is in excess of the capacity 
of such conduit or conduits. 

Section 3. The rights, powers and authority given by this By whom 

iiii • • /. ITT- /. • rights, powers 

act shall be exercised by the city of Worcester from time to and authority 
time by such officers, servants and agents as the city council cised, etc. 
may appoint, ordain and direct, and said city shall be entitled 
to all rights and, except as herein otherwise provided, shall be 
subject to all the duties and liabilities set forth in chapter three 
hundred and sixty-one of the acts of the year eighteen hundred 
and seventy-one. 

Section 4. The city shall be liable for all damages to prop- Damages, 
erty sustained by the Commonwealth or by any persons by the 



326 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Proviso. 



Worcester 
"Water Scrip. 



taking of any land, easements, rights in land, water or water 
rights as aforesaid, or by the construction of any aqueducts, 
reservoirs or other works by authority hereof, the same to be 
ascertained and determined so far as the Commonwealth is 
concerned in the manner set forth in chapter four hundred and 
fifty-six of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety- 
seven, and so far as all other persons are concerned in the 
manner and within the time set forth in said chapter three 
hundred and sixty-one of the acts of the year eighteen hundred 
and seventy-one : provided, however, that no application shall 
be made for the assessment of damages for the taking of any 
water or water rights or for any injury thereto until the water 
is actually diverted under authority of this act, and no water 
shall be diverted until said city has given at least six months 
notice to all parties by publishing the same in two daily news- 
papers published in said Worcester, said notice to set forth the 
fact that said city intends to divert said waters and to fix the 
exact day upon which it intends to divert the same ; and the 
day so fixed shall be deemed the time of actual diversion, and 
the application aforesaid may be made within one year after 
such actual diversion. 

Section 5. For the purpose of defraying all costs and 
expenses incident to the acts herein authorized, including the 
payment for land, water and water rights taken or purchased, 
the city council shall have authority to borrow from time to time 
such sums of money as it shall deem necessary, to an amount 
not exceeding five hundred thousand dollars, and to issue therefor 
notes, bonds or certificates of indebtedness, to be denominated 
on the face thereof, 'Worcester "Water Scrip, and subject to the 
provisions of chapter twenty-seven of the Revised Laws. 

Section 6. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 29, 1902. 



[Chapter 391.] 

An Act to provide for the measurement of water sup- 
plied TO CITIES AND TOWNS BY THE METROPOLITAN WATER 
AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board is 

hereby authorized to construct and maintain such works and to 
water district to provide such other means as it may deem necessary for meas- 
be^measored, ur j n g t h e wa ter supplied to each of the cities and towns in the 



Water supplied 
to cities and 
towns in the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOAED. 327 

metropolitan water district, and the expenses thereof shall be 
considered as a part of the expenditure required for the con- 
struction and maintenance, respectively, of the metropolitan 
water works. 

Section 2. The said board shall report to the next general made'ofquan- 
court the quantity of water supplied to each of the said cities auppiiedtoeach 
and towns, and shall also report whether water is being used city and town, 
therein unnecessarily or improperly, and shall make recom- 
mendations as to the manner in which waste may be prevented 
and as to the manner in which the consumption of water may 
be considered in the apportionment among the cities and towns 
of the annual assessment required for the construction and 
maintenance of the metropolitan water works. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 13, 1902. 



[Chapter 392.] 

An Act to authorize the town of natick to enlarge and 

improve its system of water supply. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The town of Natick, acting by its water com- Town of Natick 

. -, , ma y take cer- 

missioners, may enlarge and improve its system of water supply tain waters, 
established under the provisions of chapter seventy-six of the 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and seventy-three and acts 
in amendment thereof and in addition thereto, and may con- 
struct and maintain driven, artesian or other wells upon a 
parcel of land owned by the town and bounded northerly by 
Worcester street, easterly by the Saxonville branch of the 
Boston and Albany railroad, and southerly and westerly by 
land of the city of Boston; may take, hold and convey into 
and through said land, and thence through said town, from 
Lake Cochituate, at any convenient point upon the same, within 
said town and within one half mile of said parcel of land, suf- 
ficient water for the use of said town and its inhabitants for the 
extinguishment of fires and for domestic and other purposes ; 
may take, for the purposes aforesaid, by purchase or otherwise, 
and hold any lands, rights of way and easements necessary for 
laying, constructing and maintaining pipes, aqueducts, water 
courses, reservoirs, and such other works as may be necessary 
for holding, conveying and distributing said water or for pre- 
serving the purity thereof ; and may construct and lay conduits, 
pipes and other works, under and over any land, water courses, 



328 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

railroads, railways or public or private ways, in such manner 
as not unnecessarily to obstruct the same. 

Section 8. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May i5, 1902. 



[Chapter 438. J 

An Act to establish a state board of publication. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
pubfiMtfon, ' Section 1. A state board of publication is hereby created, 
te P rmB°etc! nt ' to ^ e composed of three persons from different branches of the 
public service, who shall be appointed by the governor with 
the advice and consent of the council. One member shall be 
appointed for the term of three years, one for the term of two 
years and one for the term of one year, and thereafter one per- 
son shall be appointed annually to serve for the term of three 
years. No person shall remain a member of the board after his 
retirement from the branch of the public service from which he 
was appointed, and the members of the board may be removed 
at any time by the governor. The members of the board shall 
receive no compensation for their services, but may expend not 
more than three hundred dollars annually for such travelling, 
clerical and other necessary expenses as the governor and coun- 
cil approve ; and shall annually in January make a report to the 
general court, with such recommendations and suggestions as 
they deem expedient. 
InittSustorm Section 2. It shall be the duty of the said board to examine 
reports C etc ain ^ De annua l reports and all special reports and other documents 
issued by or on behalf of the Commonwealth by any public 
officer, board or commission, and to define the form and extent 
thereof, as hereinafter provided. But this act shall not apply 
to publications issued by the officers of either branch of the 
general court, or issued under authority of the general court, 
nor to the regular annual reports of the attorney-general, of the 
treasurer and receiver general, of the auditor, or of the secre- 
tary of the Commonwealth, or to publications prepared by the 
secretary in conformity with sections one and three of chapter 
nine of the Revised Laws. 
etc^ma^make Section 3. Public officers, boards or commissions may, in 
report8. 8peclal addition to their annual reports, make such special reports as 
shall be deemed by the state board of publication to be of prac- 
tical utility. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 329 

Section 4. All boards or commissions before entering upon No report to be 

printed without 

the preparation of any publication shall submit to the state the approval 

# 01 1X16 StStG 

board of publication careful statements of the scope, and esti- board of pub- 
mates of the size, of such publication. The said board shall 
have power to determine the number of pages to which any such 
report may extend, and to determine whether it shall include 
maps, plans, photogravures, woodcuts or other illustrations ; 
and no such report shall be printed unless it bears the certified 
approval of the state board of publication. 

Section 5. After the first day of April in the year nineteen Payment of 

*■' L ^ cost of printing, 

hundred and three the cost of printing and publishing every etc. 
such report or other document shall be charged to and paid from 
the appropriation of the department from which it is issued. 

Section 6. Appeal may be taken from the decision of the Appeal, 
state board of publication to the governor and council, whose 
decision shall be final. 

Section 7. Sections ten and eleven of chapter one hundred Re P eal - 
and seven of the Revised Laws, section six of chapter nine of 
the Revised Laws, and so much of section seven of said chapter 
as refers to maps, plans, photogravures, woodcuts or other pic- 
torial illustrations, are hereby repealed. 

Section 8. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 5, 1902. 



[Chapter 480.] 

An Act to authorize the city of newton to lay main 
drains and common sewers in a part of beacon street 
in the city of boston and to make assessments therefor 
upon certain property in the city of newton. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. The city of Newton is hereby authorized to con- city of Newton 

^ ^ may lay main 

struct and maintain common sewers and main drains in Beacon drains, etc., in a 

part of Beacon 

street in the city of Boston, from the Newton line easterly to street, Boston. 
Reservoir lane, so-called, thence through said Reservoir lane 
and land of the Boston and Albany Railroad Company to con- 
nect with the sewers of the town of Brookline : ptrovided, how- Proviso. 
ever, that such main drains and common sewers shall be laid in 
said Beacon street and Reservoir lane only with the consent of, 
and in a manner approved by, the board or officer to whom the 
care and control of the territory in which the sewer is laid may 
for the time be committed. 



330 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Damages. Section 2. Any damages occasioned by the taking of land 

or any right therein under authority hereof shall be ascertained 
and recovered in the manner provided by law in the case of land 
or rights therein taken for the laying out of ways in the city of 
Newton, and any damages which the* city of Boston shall be 
required to pay by reason of said sewers and drains being in 
said territory, or by reason of any act or neglect of the city of 
Newton in placing them therein, shall be repaid to the city of 
Boston by the city of Newton. 

bettermentB,° f Section 3. The city of Newton is hereby authorized to lay, 
assess and collect sewer assessments upon the land in the city 
of Newton abutting upon said Beacon street, and upon any 
other land in the city of Newton which is benefited by said 
sewers, in the same manner in which sewer assessments now 
are or hereafter maybe laid, assessed and collected in that 
city. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 16, 1902. 



etc. 



[Chapter 488.] 

An Act to provide for supplying the town of wakefield 

with water. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

field may be ake Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
admitted into shall on application admit the town of Wakefield into the metro- 

tne metre-poll- l l 

tan water die- politan water district and furnish water to the same on the 

tnct, etc. L 

terms prescribed by chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of 
the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five, subject 
however to the provisions of sections fourteen and fifteen of 
this act. 

Qnestiooof Section 16. This act. except as provided in section seven- 

acceptance to be 1 l 

submitted to teen, shall take effect upon its acceptance by a majority vote 
of the voters of the town of Wakefield present and voting 
thereon at the next annual town meeting, or at a special town 
meeting called for the purpose within two years after its pas- 
sage ; but the number of meetings so specially called shall not 
exceed three. . . . 

Sect 1 10 take Section 17. So much of this act as authorizes its submission 
to the legal voters of said town shall take effect upon its pas- 
sage, but it shall not take further effect until accepted as 
hereinbefore provided by the legal voters of said town. [Ap- 
proved June 19, 1902. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 331 

[Chapter 535.] 

An Act relative to protecting the purity of water by the 
metropolitan water and sewerage board. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1 . The metropolitan water and sewerage board Certain rules 

1 ° and regulations 

shall not in the case of any manufacturing plant or tannery not to be 

J . ° r J enforced until 

now in operation upon the watershed of the south branch of the certain works 

are constructed. 

Nashua river above the main dam in Clinton enforce the rules 
and regulations made by the state board of health under the 
provisions of chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts 
of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five, and acts in 
amendment thereof and in addition thereto, until said board has 
constructed works for the removal or purification of manufactur- 
ing refuse or polluting liquid incident to or resulting from the 
processes of such manufacturing plant or tannery : provided, Proviso, 
that the owner of such manufacturing plant or tannery con- 
sents, without charge therefor, to the construction of suitable 
works upon his land and within his buildings so far as such 
works can be constructed thereon or therein. The amount paid 
for such works shall be considered as a part of the expense of 
construction of the metropolitan water works, and such works 
shall be maintained and operated as a part of said water works. 
Section 2. This act shall 'take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 27, 1902. 



RESOLVES. 

[Chapter 112.] 

Resolve relative to an investigation of the improvement 
of spot pond brook by the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage board. 

Resolved, That the metropolitan water and sewerage board condition of 
is hereby authorized and directed to investigate the condition brook Sbe 
of Spot Pond brook in Stoneham, Melrose and Maiden, and to 1 e n J e8tlgated ' 
report a plan for such improvements to the brook as will provide 
for the easy and natural flow to tide water of the water from 
Doleful pond and surrounding country turned into it by said 
board. The board shall take into consideration the whole ques- 
tion of the improvement of the brook, shall ascertain what 
troubles are to be remedied, and by what methods the needed 
improvements may be effected, and shall give public notice and 
a hearing to all persons interested. If the board finds that such 



332 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

plan and improvements are feasible and desirable, it shall recom- 
mend a plan for apportioning the expense of the improvements 
between the Commonwealth and towns and cities benefited, and 
the extent, if any, to which betterments should be imposed upon 
abutting owners. Said report shall be made to the general court 
before the fifteenth day of January in the year nineteen hundred 
and three. [Approved June 11, 1902. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 333 



Index to Legislation of the Year 1902 



AFFECTING THE 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



A. 

ANNUAL REPORTS. Chap. Sect, 

of Boards and Commissions of Commonwealth to be examined, etc., by State 

Board of Publication, 438 2-8 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

North Metropolitan System of Sewage Disposal, 51 1 

South Metropolitan System of Sewage Disposal, 13 1 



C. 

COCHITTJATE LAKE. 

Natick may take waters of, 392 1 

D. 

DAMAGES. 

to property of Commonwealth, city of Worcester liable for, .... 351 1 
to property injured by taking of the waters of Lake Cochituate, town of Natick 

to pay, 392 3 

M. 

MANUFACTURING PLANT AND TANNERY. 

rules of State Board of Health against certain, not to be enforced against, 

until, etc., 535 1 

METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

to fix the time when property is taken for, 101 1 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

may furnish water to and admit town of Milton into Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict 307 14 

may furnish water to and admit Wakefield to Metropolitan Water District, . 488 1 

may furnish water to certain water companies and sections of cities and towns, 189 1 

relative to protection of purity of water by 535 1 

to fix the time when property is taken by 101 1 

to investigate the matter of the improvement of Spot Pond brook, Resolves, 112 

to provide for measurement, etc., of water supplied to cities and towns, . . 391 1, 2 



334 WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. [P. D. No. 57. 

METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS. 

Chap. Sect, 
works for removal, etc., of refuse, etc., from certain manufacturing plant and 

tannery, to be part of, 535 1 

MILTON. 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board may admit into Metropolitan "Water 

District and furnish water to, 307 14 

N. 
NATICK. 

town of, may take waters of Lake Cochituate, 392 1 

NEWTON. 

city of, may lay, maintain, etc., drains and sewers in Reservoir lane, . . 480 1, 2 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM OF SEWAGE DISPOSAL. 

appropriation for, . 51 1 

R. 

RESERVOIR LANE. 

city of Newton, may lay, etc., drains and sewers in, 480 1,2 

S. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM OP SEWAGE DISPOSAL. 

appropriation for, 13 1 

SPOT POND BROOK. 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, to investigate the improvement of, 

STATE BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 

established, 438 1-8 

T. 

TANNERY AND MANUFACTURING PLANT. 

rules, etc., of State Board of Health, not to be enforced against certain, 

until, etc., 535 1 

W. 

WAKEFIELD. 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board shall admit into Metropolitan Water 

District and furnish water to, 488 1 

WATER. 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board to furnish, to the water companies, 

etc., 189 1 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board may furnish, to town of Milton, . 307 14 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board shall furnish, to town of Wakefield, . 488 1 

provision to provide for the measurement of, 391 1, 2 

WORCESTER. 

city of, liable for damages to property of Commonwealth, 351 4